Academic – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 23:52:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://sohamsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Academic – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ 32 32 Editorial: Schools Should Make the Most of the New School Year Calendar | New times https://sohamsa.org/editorial-schools-should-make-the-most-of-the-new-school-year-calendar-new-times/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 22:39:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/editorial-schools-should-make-the-most-of-the-new-school-year-calendar-new-times/ The the new academic year opens Monday October 11 as Rwanda returns to school programs that start at this time of year, having recently dropped a school calendar that started in January. It is a victory for the supporters of the school calendar reintroduced who argued that this allows students to go on long vacations […]]]>

The the new academic year opens Monday October 11 as Rwanda returns to school programs that start at this time of year, having recently dropped a school calendar that started in January.

It is a victory for the supporters of the school calendar reintroduced who argued that this allows students to go on long vacations before the extremely harsh weather conditions that are normally encountered during the third quarter of the year.

The new schedule is expected to boost students’ concentration and, subsequently, their performance, as they will skip classes during the long hot season, although climate change has made weather conditions increasingly unpredictable in recent years.

School administrators and teachers should make the most of adjustments and help students learn and acquire new knowledge and skills and grasp academic concepts, not only for the purpose of passing eventual exams, but to improve their thinking. criticism, analytical skills and general understanding of the world.

In addition, the change effectively aligns the school year of schools with that of higher education institutions and is likely to reduce the length of the gap year that high school graduates have been forced to wait before joining university. .

And, it is hoped that the new school calendar will help planning in the education sector as it now matches the financial year, which runs from July to June.

Meanwhile, schools are reopening at a time when the country is still grappling with the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic and the virus itself.

While vaccines have instilled a sense of hope, the virus continues to spread, even killing people.

This calls for continued vigilance to prevent the situation from worsening again.

Schools have a major role to play as they cater for a large number of young people, some of whom are day schools, which means that there are high levels of interactions not only between students but also between students and the rest of the world. the society.

There is a need to stick to the basics, like social distancing, washing your hands or sanitizing regularly, masking yourself, and making the most of outdoor spaces.

We wish schools, learners and teachers good luck as they embark on the new school year.

editor@newtimesrwanda.com


Source link

]]>
Academic Senate discusses university funding and vaccination rates at the first meeting of the school year – https://sohamsa.org/academic-senate-discusses-university-funding-and-vaccination-rates-at-the-first-meeting-of-the-school-year/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 17:45:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/academic-senate-discusses-university-funding-and-vaccination-rates-at-the-first-meeting-of-the-school-year/ At the first Academic Senate meeting of the school year on Tuesday, President Jeffrey Armstrong and members of the Senate discussed COVID-19 numbers and new financial policies that may extend scholarships and student aid. The Academic Senate is the governing body of the faculty at Cal Poly. Armstrong said the university “will begin the process […]]]>

At the first Academic Senate meeting of the school year on Tuesday, President Jeffrey Armstrong and members of the Senate discussed COVID-19 numbers and new financial policies that may extend scholarships and student aid. The Academic Senate is the governing body of the faculty at Cal Poly.

Armstrong said the university “will begin the process this fall” to increase college tuition fees. He said most of the income will go to financial aid and scholarships. The rest will help cover the costs of employee salaries, the number of tenured professors and infrastructure.

The increase in income would lower tuition fees for students who need it most and allow the university to offer more scholarships, according to Armstrong.

Senate Speaker Thomas Gutierrez started the meeting with orientation for new senators to the Senate. During his remarks, President Gutierrez covered the meeting agenda, membership, meeting structure and etiquette, and rules for new resolutions.

The provost’s report was given by Cynthia Jackson-Elmoore who informed the Senate of the Baker and Koob endowments now open.

“These grants are available to all Cal Poly students and they support interdisciplinary research and learning-by-doing projects,” Jackson-Elmoore said. “They are a great way of collaboration between professors and students. “

More information on the endowments and how to apply is available on the Marshal’s Office Web Page.

Vice President of Student Affairs Keith Humphrey talks about the issues of campus life

Vice President of Student Affairs Keith Humphrey recognized the Clery Act notification from the Office of Civil Rights and Compliance which was emailed to students on Tuesday morning.

“It’s a terrible, terrible thing,” Humphrey said. “Please know that we are working very hard to support the student involved this morning and that she is receiving excellent care from our community.

Humphrey then discussed the current immunization updates, which at the time of the meeting amounted to just under 94% of the student body fully immunized and an additional 0.5% being immunized. Students currently living on campus are 96.4% fully immunized.


Source link

]]>
500 prisoners with a doctorate: “University detention” – Münker Odabaşı https://sohamsa.org/500-prisoners-with-a-doctorate-university-detention-munker-odabasi/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 12:04:30 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/500-prisoners-with-a-doctorate-university-detention-munker-odabasi/ * Photo: Pixabay Click to read the article in Turkish According to September data from the General Directorate of Prisons and Remand Centers, there are 460 inmates with doctorates. While the majority of inmates with doctorates are men, six are women with doctorates. In addition, in Turkish prisons there are also 2,371 inmates who have […]]]>

* Photo: Pixabay

Click to read the article in Turkish

According to September data from the General Directorate of Prisons and Remand Centers, there are 460 inmates with doctorates.

While the majority of inmates with doctorates are men, six are women with doctorates. In addition, in Turkish prisons there are also 2,371 inmates who have completed their master’s studies.

The fact that there are over 2,000 detainees holding a master’s degree shows the current dimensions of university detention as another phase of detention in Turkey. So while Boğaziçi University has 449 professors with doctorates, prisons have 460 inmates with doctorates.

Click on the image to enlarge

“Open the door, director; I have a thesis to defend ‘

These data, prepared on the basis of information provided by those arrested and sentenced during their imprisonment, show that school internment is also on the increase. Inmates who have completed their thesis defense and obtained the approval of the jury seem to use as a humorous expression the motto “Open the door, director, I have a thesis to defend”.

Data from September from the Directorate General of Prisons and Remand Centers also showed that in addition to prisoners with deputy and doctorate degrees, there were also 27,515 university graduates behind bars.

The number of university graduates sentenced in prisons. Source: TurkStat

“27,000 university graduates in prison”

These days, as the new academic year has just started at Turkish universities, those “on the outside” are having problems finding accommodation while the 27,000 university graduates “on the inside” are having problems finding accommodation. access free education.

According to 2019 data from the Turkish Statistical Institute (TurkStat), the number of convicted university graduates is around 20,000 in Turkish prisons. Taken with the arrested prisoners, the image reaches concerning dimensions.

On the other hand, when the statistics of TurkStat are examined, it is seen that there has been a serious increase in the number of inmates with university degrees during the 8-year period from 2012 to 2019.

While the number of university graduates sentenced in prisons was around 4,000 in 2012, this number increased fivefold and reached 20,000. Based on the table, it can be concluded that either university graduates started to commit more crimes in recent years, ie university graduates have been increasingly arrested for different / political reasons. (MO / TP / SD)


Source link

]]>
Candidates with diverse skills focused on academic excellence https://sohamsa.org/candidates-with-diverse-skills-focused-on-academic-excellence/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 10:36:22 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/candidates-with-diverse-skills-focused-on-academic-excellence/ The Old Lyme RTC has approved four candidates for the Board of Education, who bring all the skills and energy to the school system. The RTC’s mentions didn’t just focus on party affiliation, but rather reflected a strong desire to present the best people for the job. Each candidate has demonstrated a desire to maintain […]]]>

The Old Lyme RTC has approved four candidates for the Board of Education, who bring all the skills and energy to the school system. The RTC’s mentions didn’t just focus on party affiliation, but rather reflected a strong desire to present the best people for the job. Each candidate has demonstrated a desire to maintain excellence in our schools and to be sensitive to community concerns. Here are some highlights demonstrating the breadth of experience our candidates have:

  • Laura Dean-Frazier (U) grew up in Old Lyme and has three children who went through our school system. She has been very active in the PTOs of all of our schools, as well as a Park and Rec volunteer for many years. Laura is well known for her volunteer work in this community, especially through her years of coaching. She wants to maintain the quality of our excellent school system.
  • Mona Colwell (U) is a substitute teacher in the LOL school system. She has a solid professional background in finance as an analyst and salesperson. She has children in our school system and is a dedicated volunteer with the PTA and LOL Soccer Club. Its goals include ensuring the quality of our schools while spending money wisely.
  • Chris Staab (D) has two children in our school system. Chris is used to giving his time and talents to the city. His participation in the Harbor Management Commission, the Lyme Old Lyme Election Foundation and LOL Little League demonstrates his commitment to improving the community. Chris has a solid management background in his career, bringing excellent leadership skills to the Board of Education.
  • Michael Presti (right) is retired after a successful 24-year career in the United States Coast Guard. He now teaches social sciences in the New London school system. Michael has two children in the LOL school system. He has a penchant for teaching civics and the principles of our constitution. Michael will work hard to maintain the quality and high standards of our school system, bringing teaching experience to the BOE.

In these uncertain times, it is imperative that we elect candidates determined to keep our schools safe and open, who will effectively represent local values ​​and commit to taking a thoughtful and transparent approach to budgeting and financial spending of the government. district. Our Board of Education candidates are the best choice for Old Lyme.

Vote for Republican-backed candidates on the Education Council on November 2sd.

Chris Carter
President RTC Old Lyme, CT


Source link

]]>
Norwalk high school students receive national academic accolades https://sohamsa.org/norwalk-high-school-students-receive-national-academic-accolades/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 19:54:57 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/norwalk-high-school-students-receive-national-academic-accolades/ NORWALK – Four high school students are awarded with national academic distinctions. Jacob Kolman, a student at Brien McMahon High School, has been named a semi-finalist of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. He is one of some 16,000 semi-finalists in the 67th annual National Merit Scholarship Program. “An insightful and strong person with a great […]]]>

NORWALK – Four high school students are awarded with national academic distinctions.

Jacob Kolman, a student at Brien McMahon High School, has been named a semi-finalist of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. He is one of some 16,000 semi-finalists in the 67th annual National Merit Scholarship Program.

“An insightful and strong person with a great aptitude for math and science, Jacob is empowered to understand how things work, whether it’s a 100-year-old math problem or exploring the forces that hold us together. universe, ”said the Norwalk Public Schools press release.


Over 1.5 million juniors in approximately 21,000 high schools have entered the National Merit Scholarship Program 2022 by passing the preliminary qualifying test for the SAT / National Merit Scholarships 2020 (PSAT / NMSQT) , which served as the initial selection of program participants.

About 15,000 people are expected to advance to the finalist level, which will be announced in February. Each finalist will compete for 7,600 national scholarships worth over $ 30 million. The winners for 2022 will be announced from April.

Kolman enrolled in the International Baccalaureate program in his first year and is a candidate for the diploma of the career-related program. The program integrates IB courses with Project Lead the Way courses in STEM. He is also a member of the Music Technology Department, Co-Captain of the Mathematics Team, a Distinguished Member of the Robotics Team, and a member of Brien McMahon’s Golf Team.

Brien McMahon’s seniors, Sofia Cabrera and Isabella De Jesus, and Norwalk High School junior Andrea Mejia have been named 2021-2022 National Hispanic Recognition Program Fellows. They were three of about 5,000 recognized Hispanic / Latino juniors out of the more than 400,000 who took the PSAT, which is also used by the NHRP as a qualifying test.

The National Hispanic Recognition Program grant provides underrepresented students with academic accolades that can be included in college and scholarship applications and connects students to universities nationwide.


Source link

]]>
Beverly Gage and fellow Yale professors sound the alarm on academic freedom after resignation https://sohamsa.org/beverly-gage-and-fellow-yale-professors-sound-the-alarm-on-academic-freedom-after-resignation/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 06:34:52 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/beverly-gage-and-fellow-yale-professors-sound-the-alarm-on-academic-freedom-after-resignation/ The historian’s decision prompted professors to call on the University to make a firm commitment to shield academia from donor influences. Philip Mousavizadeh & Isaac Yu 02:34, 06 October 2021 Staff reporters Courtesy of Beverly Gage After announcing her resignation from the Grand Strategy program, history professor Beverly Gage expressed concern about the influence donors […]]]>

The historian’s decision prompted professors to call on the University to make a firm commitment to shield academia from donor influences.


declaration support for Gage Friday.

“The last few days have been really encouraging for me to see how seriously people take the issue of academic freedom, to see the level of attention it receives and the response that has been requested from the University” , Gage said.

The Senate of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, which issued its own press release Friday, will begin an investigation this week. The executive board plans to meet with Gage and Salovey this week and determine appropriate measures to prevent future incidents, Senate Speaker Valerie Horsley told The News.

Asked about specific policies that would strengthen protections for academic freedom, Gage suggested that a university official could be appointed as an ombudsman, or neutral third party, in the event of a dispute. Increased transparency requirements regarding donor agreements and administrative actions could also help, she said.

Meanwhile, Gage colleagues continue to voice concerns about the threat to academic freedom.

“It sounds like a textbook violation of academic freedom,” philosophy professor Jason Stanley told The News. “The University is an extremely rich institution, and we have an enormous endowment. There is no reason why we should even suggest to donors that they can have control of our program.

University president Peter Salovey accepted the responsibility last Friday, saying in a declaration that he “should have made more efforts to improve the situation”. Yet, as the News reported last week, Vice-President Academic Affairs Pericles Lewis denied that donors exercised undue influence over the program and reiterated that the new board had no influence. than on practitioner appointments, rather than program decisions.

Gage said he was briefly shown part of the 2006 gift deal outlining the five-member advisory board, and that the powers of appointment to the Grand Strategy advisory board were explicitly granted to the chairman of the University. The News did not review the 2006 giveaway deal.

According to Emeritus Professor of History Glenda Gilmore, the University has “catastrophically” failed to properly balance these two principles.

“Academic freedom is sacrosanct, but Salovey and Lewis’s comments suggest they tried to please donors while trying to persuade Gage to acquiesce to their interference,” Gilmore wrote in an email. “At the first complaint from donors, whether it is Bryan [Garsten’s] op-ed or Gage’s lesson plans, they should have made it clear that such conversations were inappropriate and would be prohibited in the future.

“If there is one thing the administration owes to the faculty, it is the protection of academic freedom. If they were so wrong, what else could happen? Gilmore added.

Stanley further noted that public universities in various states currently face outside influence when it comes to teaching subjects such as critical race theory. A wealthy private institution like Yale, he said, has “no excuse” for allowing outside pressure on academia.

Salovey wrote in his initial statement that he had heard concerns from professors and alumni about academic freedom and was committed to making changes accordingly.

The Great Strategy program was created in 2000.




PHILIP MOUSAVIZADEH




Philip Mousavizadeh covers the Jackson Institute. He is a freshman at Trumbull College studying ethics, politics, and economics.




ISAAC YU




Isaac Yu writes about Yale faculty and academics. He’s also the production and design editor for the News, and has previously covered transportation and urban planning in New Haven. Originally from Garland, Texas, he is a sophomore at Berkeley College majoring in urban studies.



Source link

]]>
UK crackdown on university fraud by banning ‘test factories’ https://sohamsa.org/uk-crackdown-on-university-fraud-by-banning-test-factories/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 18:55:24 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/uk-crackdown-on-university-fraud-by-banning-test-factories/ Companies that help university and college students cheat by writing essays must be criminalized under the government’s new proposals. Companies that provide, organize or advertise paid review writing services will be banned in England, the Department of Education said on Tuesday. Alex Burghart, the newly appointed skills minister, said: “Test factories are totally unethical and […]]]>

Companies that help university and college students cheat by writing essays must be criminalized under the government’s new proposals.

Companies that provide, organize or advertise paid review writing services will be banned in England, the Department of Education said on Tuesday.

Alex Burghart, the newly appointed skills minister, said: “Test factories are totally unethical and profit by undermining the hard work of most students. We are taking action to ban these cheating services. ”

The measures will be added to the 16-year skills and education bill which is currently under consideration in parliament, indicating continued concerns about the rise of academic fraud across the country.

The Higher Education Quality Assurance Agency, the body responsible for enforcing academic standards at universities, has identified more than 900 websites offering cheating services, up from 635 in 2018.

Some essay companies rely on writers from Africa and the Middle East to produce plagiarism works, while others boast that their writers have frequented elite British institutions. Ministers lobbied online payment and advertising platforms to ban such services from their sites.

On Tuesday, a website reported that a mediocre 1,000-word undergraduate history essay would cost £ 124 on seven days’ notice. They also offered funding, allowing students to pay the cost over one year.

Another announced that he would provide a 15,000 word mastery course in 60 days for £ 4,000. On his website, he also said that his service isn’t cheating and that students should “use our personalized essays as a guide to lead. [their] studies”.

Former universities minister Chris Skidmore introduced a bill in February to implement a ban, calling testing factories “a rot that infects the very discipline of learning.”

Skidmore added that his bill “would not seek to criminalize the students themselves” for using such services. He noted that other countries, especially Australia, are providing a role model for the government as it seeks to crack down on the practice.

Officials told the FT that some companies have even blackmailed students, threatening to expose their clients’ fraud to their institutions if they don’t pay.

Universities UK, which represents the vice-chancellors, welcomed the news. “Although the use of essay mills by students is rare, all universities have codes of conduct that include severe penalties for students who submit work that is not theirs,” he said. .

The National Union of Students said that companies “exploit the vulnerabilities and insecurities of students to make money through exploitation” and urged universities to deploy academic and pastoral support to end the attractiveness of these businesses.


Source link

]]>
Adams14 school district loses accreditation https://sohamsa.org/adams14-school-district-loses-accreditation/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:33:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/adams14-school-district-loses-accreditation/ DENVER – For the first time in state history, a school district lost its accreditation. At a special meeting Monday, the Colorado State Board of Education announced the revocation of accreditation for the Adams14 School District amid a dispute between the district and its external management group. The management group was brought in to oversee […]]]>

DENVER – For the first time in state history, a school district lost its accreditation.

At a special meeting Monday, the Colorado State Board of Education announced the revocation of accreditation for the Adams14 School District amid a dispute between the district and its external management group.

The management group was brought in to oversee the district for a period of four years after years of academic underperformance.

The district had been arguing with MGT for months, until the conversation reached a boiling point in August. The district had engaged an outside group to carry out an independent evaluation of MGT’s work.

The district then alleged that it paid millions to the management group to cover the expenses of the subcontractors, but Adams14 then paid the subcontractors separately for identical services.

A stop-work order was issued at this time and MGT staff were evicted from the Adams School buildings14. He also stopped paying MGT.

In September, the Colorado State Board of Education held a meeting and asked the school district and management group to find a way to work together and sign a joint report as proof of this cooperation.

MGT and the district then began to negotiate over arrears, a $ 500,000 bonus and legal liabilities, but were unable to come to an agreement before the October 1 deadline set by the state council.

During Monday’s special meeting, the board met in executive session for nearly two hours to discuss the dispute. When they returned to the open session, the council members then made it clear that the district had lost its accreditation and that it should take important steps to regain that status.

“We never want that accreditation step taken away, but given the impact on students, that’s where we are today. I hope this is a testament to the incredible importance and concern we have for this district and its students. The reality is that things have to change, ”said Katy Anthes, Education Commissioner.

A loss of accreditation does not affect the day-to-day operations of the schools or the funding the district will receive.

Instead, the State Council is getting more involved and presenting steps to follow. If the district does not comply, the state council could order it to reorganize, dissolve, or merge with another.

At Monday’s meeting, the board implored both sides to try and work together towards a resolution.

“Now what we really need is for both sides to put their differences aside and come back to what’s important and that’s what’s happening in the classroom,” Anthes said. “It’s actually asking adults to work together and do it quickly. “

However, within the state council itself, there was disagreement over what to require of the school district. Some have asked that only the district regain its accreditation after signing a memorandum of understanding.

Board member Rebecca McClellan said that by restoring MGT’s authority and access to school buildings, the district has made a good faith effort to comply with state orders. Other board members agreed and accused MGT of trying to take advantage of the situation with some of its demands.

However, the majority of the State Council disagreed. Most outspoken was Steve Durham, who said the district was behaving badly and not following the dispute resolution orders it was supposed to follow. He said reinstating the district’s accreditation without some sort of agreement with MGT would reward bad behavior.

“I think their (district) violation of the order was willful and they intended to create a crisis,” Durham said.

He agreed that some of the demands made by MGT were unreasonable, but instead offered a motion in which both parties should agree that MGT has the management of the district and that the previous contract remains in place.

The motion was passed and the district now has until Thursday to comply or further action may be taken.

“We appreciate the thoughtfulness with which the State Council has reviewed the current situation at Adams 14, and we hope the extra time can lead to an agreement this week with the school district. We strongly agree with members of the State Board that the focus should be on the needs of students, ”Eric Parish, executive vice president of MGT Consulting, said in a statement in Denver7.

The Adams14 school district did not respond to requests for interviews or reports.


Source link

]]>
Georgia on our minds | Opinion https://sohamsa.org/georgia-on-our-minds-opinion/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 02:45:05 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/georgia-on-our-minds-opinion/ Georgia comes to Harvard. No no where Justin Bieber gets his peaches – the country of the Caucasus region. The country’s Ministry of Education and Science has awarded the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard $ 2.3 million to establish a Georgian studies program at the university. The program is the first […]]]>

Georgia comes to Harvard. No no where Justin Bieber gets his peaches – the country of the Caucasus region. The country’s Ministry of Education and Science has awarded the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard $ 2.3 million to establish a Georgian studies program at the university. The program is the first of its kind: a center dedicated to the study of Georgian outside Georgia. Proclaimed as “historicalFor both Harvard and Georgia, this center represents fairly uncharted territory for the Harvard academic community and aims to open up intellectual and physical access for Harvard students to the region.

We could hardly have guessed that the next international center at Harvard would choose to focus on a former Soviet republic with a population smaller than the namesake US state. Nonetheless, we hope that the niche field is full of exciting intellectual opportunities. The initiative’s academic output could prove to be rewarding, especially if it allows academics to take a potentially critical nuanced approach to the Georgian government under the auspices of free speech. We look forward to seeing our scholarship pay off.

But aside from the abstract academic potential, why, of all possible places, does Georgia fit into our programs? And why does this decision make sense?

For better or worse, what we teach in Harvard classrooms matters. Our university has long-standing ties to the highest levels of the US Federal Government and a range of direct ties to the upper echelons of one of the most powerful regimes on the planet. Our lectures and papers may therefore have more geopolitical significance than we would like to admit, shaping elite scholarship and influential viewpoints. The issues we choose to explore and the networks we help build are strongly opposed to those stones (or countries) that we are leaving aside; the Georgian Studies Center, whose definition focuses on a single Caucasian country of 3.7 million people, is no exception.

This does not in itself mean that the new center and the associated gift are somehow undesirable. Gifts from foreign countries do not have a negative impact just because of their foreign status, even if this status warrants an additional degree of scrutiny. On the contrary, as we have argued in the past, every donation deserves to be carefully inspected and in good faith. Any new academic endeavor – especially one that relies almost entirely on the support of a single political donor – must be rigorously evaluated and approached with continued and healthy skepticism. Harvard must be prepared to assess donations on their own merits and in accordance with our broader institutional values ​​of truth and integrity, regardless of their national origin or the initial temptation to price them. Money can rarely be separated from its motives.

The Georgian Studies curriculum is also an interesting example of how what we study – where we direct our attention – is guided by where there is power, and with it capital. We are reminded that the centers and spaces that we see represented on campuses like Harvard tend to be those that relate to the interests of those who can afford to fund them. We know of some highly demanded alternatives that need institutional support, but a place will be made for academics in Tbilisi. While Georgian studies certainly offer unique and exciting perspectives, our enthusiasm is marred to know that other equally fascinating nations and fields of study will not be inspected.

The continued lack of an ethnic studies program, in particular, comes to mind as a bitter reminder of the scholarship that we fail to fund, despite its popularity. This is yet another example of our institutional priorities becoming at least partially contingent on the whims of philanthropists, with donations that define more than our budgets.

None of the above negates the program for the academic value of Georgian Studies, and there is no doubt that it will prove to be exciting for many of our peers, especially those from Georgia or of Georgian descent. We look forward to seeing how this scholarship can lead to concrete improvements in our intellectual life at home and abroad.

But if Harvard is truly committed to seeking truth through education, it must pursue everything that needs to be known, not just what is funded. After all, not all useful research is behind generous, carefully wrapped gifts.

This staff editorial represents the majority opinion of The Crimson Editorial Board only. It is the product of discussions at regular editorial board meetings. In order to ensure the impartiality of our journalism, Crimson editors who choose to express their opinion and vote at these meetings are not involved in the reporting of articles on similar topics.

Have a suggestion, question or concern for The Crimson Editorial Board? Click on here.


Source link

]]>
Academic activities are not threatened by anti-foreign interference law: MHA, Politics News & Top Stories https://sohamsa.org/academic-activities-are-not-threatened-by-anti-foreign-interference-law-mha-politics-news-top-stories/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 05:18:40 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/academic-activities-are-not-threatened-by-anti-foreign-interference-law-mha-politics-news-top-stories/ SINGAPORE – Academics presenting research abroad, writing for international journals and receiving international funding will not fall under the proposed law to combat foreign interference, the Home Office (MHA) said in a Facebook post on Sunday October 3. The ministry responded to academics Cherian George, Chong Ja Ian, Linda Lim and Teo You Yenn who […]]]>

SINGAPORE – Academics presenting research abroad, writing for international journals and receiving international funding will not fall under the proposed law to combat foreign interference, the Home Office (MHA) said in a Facebook post on Sunday October 3.

The ministry responded to academics Cherian George, Chong Ja Ian, Linda Lim and Teo You Yenn who expressed concern, in an editorial posted on Academia.sg on Friday, that the Foreign Interference (Countermeasures) Bill ( Fica), in its current form, “would suddenly turn currently promoted activities into a legal minefield”.

The editorial listed various activities that could potentially be threatened by the Fica passage, including “presenting research at conferences abroad; write for international journals and multi-author book projects; publish and edit for prestigious university presses; participate in international collaborative research projects. ; participation in scholarships, visiting appointments and training programs; and participation in international funding opportunities ”.

The MHA said: “Please allow us to state without reservation: none of these activities will be affected by the Fica.

“If professors manage to get their articles accepted in international journals, their books published by prestigious university presses abroad, or if they receive splendid scholarships and awards from any foreign university, they will not encounter any obstacle on the part of Fica – or for that matter, any other law in Singapore. “

Fica targets foreign interference in domestic politics through hostile information campaigns and local proxies.

It grants the MHA the power to issue instructions forcing internet platforms to block accounts and to require politically important people to declare their foreign affiliations, among other things.

MHA added that Fica will also not hinder other examples of Singaporean academics involved in foreign collaborations and online broadcasting cited by the editorial:

– A doctoral student who challenges “the criminalization of gay sex” in an online cultural studies journal published by a research center based at Osaka University;

– A journal article in Asia Bioethic Review highlighting the “multiple barriers to access” to health care faced by migrant workers in Singapore, one of the co-authors of which is employed by a university in Singapore. foreigner ;

– A political scientist attending a webinar sponsored by the University of Sydney on “Current political issues in Singapore”.

The ministry said: “What possible reason can Fica apply in any of these cases?”

The MHA added that the Fica would only apply if the Singaporean academic in question acts on behalf of a foreign agency to carry out a hostile online information campaign directed against the Singapore public interest, so as to create discord and unrest among Singaporeans.

“The discussion on a number of controversial issues – in foreign journals, in foreign conferences, in foreign universities – will not be affected by Fica,” he said.

The professors who wrote the editorial said internationalization is one of the criteria taken into account in university rankings and acknowledged that Singaporean universities occupy “stratospheric positions in international rankings”.

But this “enviable” reputation could not have been earned if the Singapore government were as oppressive and authoritarian as the editorial suggests, MHA argued.

The ministry also noted that the same group of professors had raised similar concerns for academics about the passage of the Fake News Act, Protection Against Falsehood and Online Manipulation (Pofma) Act, but none. academic article has only been stopped by Pofma to this day. .

He added: “Our academics have remained free to pursue any research they wish on any subject, and the international rankings of our universities have not been affected as a result of Pofma. We are certain that Fica will allow the same in the future. “

The Fica will be debated during the session of Parliament on Monday. A petition calling for further consideration of the bill was submitted on behalf of civil society groups by Progress Party Singapore constituency MP Leong Mun Wai.


Source link

]]>