Academic – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 02:37:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sohamsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Academic – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ 32 32 Northwestern announces NIL partnership, academic awards for student-athletes Northwestern announces NIL agreement, academic awards for student-athletes https://sohamsa.org/northwestern-announces-nil-partnership-academic-awards-for-student-athletes-northwestern-announces-nil-agreement-academic-awards-for-student-athletes/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 02:09:17 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/northwestern-announces-nil-partnership-academic-awards-for-student-athletes-northwestern-announces-nil-agreement-academic-awards-for-student-athletes/ Daily archive photo by Angeli Mittal Walter Athletic Center. Within a week, NU announced an NIL partnership with Fanatics and scholarship student-athletes can accept academic awards. In an ever-changing college athletic landscape, Northwestern is looking for new ways to support and reward its student-athletes. On the heels of National Collegiate Athletic Association v. Alston, in […]]]>

Daily archive photo by Angeli Mittal

Walter Athletic Center. Within a week, NU announced an NIL partnership with Fanatics and scholarship student-athletes can accept academic awards.

In an ever-changing college athletic landscape, Northwestern is looking for new ways to support and reward its student-athletes.

On the heels of National Collegiate Athletic Association v. Alston, in which the Supreme Court ruled that the NCAA’s restriction of educational benefits violated antitrust laws, NU announced on September 13 that all students -scholarship athletes may accept academic awards during the 2022 season. -23 academic year.

“Our focus will always be on supporting North West student-athletes in every way possible as they develop in the classroom, in the community and in competition,” athletic director Derrick Gragg said in a statement. September 13 press release. “This ability to recognize and reward academic achievement is the latest example of our university providing a top-notch foundation for the Wildcats to grow and excel.”

NU will also partner with sporting goods brands Fanatics and OneTeam, allowing Wildcat student-athletes to benefit from their name, image and likeness, the University announced Tuesday.

Through these partnerships, loyal Cats fans will be able to purchase t-shirts personalized with the name and number of their favorite NU athletes later this fall.

“We are thrilled to partner with two innovative companies committed to developing opportunities for student-athletes to maximize their personal brands,” said Tyler Jones, NU’s Senior Executive Partner for Revenue Generation and Initiatives. strategies, in a press release. “This program will allow the Wildcats to stay at the forefront of an ever-changing NIL landscape.”

Only fall sports teams, including soccer, volleyball, and men’s and women’s soccer, will be included in the initial launch, according to the University. Winter and spring teams, including but not limited to men’s and women’s basketball, baseball and softball, will launch later this year.

NU’s new partnership with Fanatics comes nearly two weeks after the retailer released its first batch of NIL college football jerseys.

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @CervantesPAlex

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Carnegie Mellon’s reckless damage control — University Affairs https://sohamsa.org/carnegie-mellons-reckless-damage-control-university-affairs/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 18:33:56 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/carnegie-mellons-reckless-damage-control-university-affairs/ What the university could have done better to protect academic freedom after a professor’s controversial tweet went viral. On September 8, amid all the global backlash to Queen Elizabeth’s death, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) released a shocking and disturbing statement distancing itself from Uju Anya, a professor in its modern languages ​​department. As rumors spread […]]]>

What the university could have done better to protect academic freedom after a professor’s controversial tweet went viral.

On September 8, amid all the global backlash to Queen Elizabeth’s death, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) released a shocking and disturbing statement distancing itself from Uju Anya, a professor in its modern languages ​​department.

As rumors spread that the Queen was dying, Dr Anya, a Nigerian-born Professor of Applied Linguistics, Critical Sociolinguistics and Critical Discourse Studies, tweeted: “I heard the Chief monarch of a genocidal thief and rapist empire is finally dying. May his pain be excruciating. Unsurprisingly, the tweet received very disapproving responses. But it wasn’t until about four hours later when Amazon owner Jeff Bezos deemed the tweet had gone super viral.

Mr Bezos, who has 5.1 million Twitter followers, retweeted Dr Anya’s original post with the comment “Is this someone supposedly working to make the world a better place? I do not think so. Wow.”

With Mr. Bezos’ tweet, the backlash against Dr. Anya escalated exponentially. Dr Anya reports that she received 500 emails within minutes of Mr Bezos’ tweet, many of which use a racial slur to refer to her. She dug in her heels, tweeting “If anyone expects me to express anything other than disdain for the monarch who oversaw a government that sponsored the genocide that massacred and displaced half my family and whose victims are still trying to overcome the consequences, you may continue to wish for a star.

Twitter removed the previous tweet for violating its to reign against abuse or harassment, which reads: “You may not engage in the targeted harassment of anyone, or incite others to do so. It includes wishing or hoping that someone would suffer physical harm.

Then came the tweeted statement from Carnegie Mellon: “We do not condone the offensive and objectionable messages posted by Uju Anya today on his personal social media account. Freedom of expression is central to the mission of higher education, however, the views she shared do not in any way represent the values ​​of the institution, nor the standards of discourse we seek to promote.

Despite Carnegie Mellon’s mandatory concession to freedom of speech, the statement is a three-fold attack on academic freedom. First, he calls Dr Anya’s posts “offensive and reprehensible”. Second, he says Dr. Anya’s comments do not represent the values ​​of the institution. Finally, it implies that Dr. Anya’s tweets do not meet Carnegie Mellon’s speech standards. Let’s go through each of them in turn.

The first of Carnegie Mellon’s undermining statements criticizes the content of Dr. Anya’s opinions as “offensive and reprehensible”. Let’s be clear: some of the work teachers do is offensive and objectionable. It is the job of universities to broaden the horizon of our understanding, including through extramural expression on matters of public interest. When we step out of current orthodoxies, it can provoke offense and objection. Moreover, some scholars aim to provoke offense and objection. Dr. Anya certainly did. His tweet was calculated to produce such a response. She is a critical race scholar who has commented publicly on colonial violence. She chose to speak forcefully — even offensively — to better convey the strength of her disapproval. But it is precisely controversial work – including offensive and objectionable work – that requires the strongest protection of academic freedom. Nobody tries to silence harmless scientists!

Next, Carnegie Mellon says that Dr. Anya’s opinions do not represent the values ​​of the institution. What a remarkable and unnecessary statement! No one would think that Dr. Anya speaks for the university. And indeed, his Twitter bio says “the views are mine.” While it may be helpful for researchers to include such notes on their social media accounts, it is not strictly necessary. Universities are made up of scholars with a wide range of perspectives, values ​​and methods, some of which are incompatible with others. It’s a feature, not a bug. The university cannot share all these different values ​​and nobody expects it. However, all these different approaches should be united under the higher value of scientific pluralism of the university. By disavowing Dr. Anya’s position, Carnegie Mellon weakens this commitment. Instead of pluralism, it’s pluralism with the exception of this.

Finally, the Carnegie Mellon statement laments Dr. Anya’s standard of speech. Again, universities must embrace the broadest conception of discourse norms. In their communications, scholars must not break the law or engage in misinformation. Dr. Anya didn’t do any of those things. She shared a strong and sincere opinion about a public figure. She did it in a shocking way, but universities cannot and should not expect their members to be polite. Indeed, on matters of grave moral concern such as the colonial misdeeds of the British monarchy, politeness might be the wrong standard of speech.

Combined, Carnegie Mellon’s three disavowals of Dr. Anya’s tweets risk creating a chilling effect for other academics – and that in the context of a black professor who was reprimanded by one of the richest men in the world. world, the Twitter followers he followed. , and the media that picked up the story. When a member of academic staff receives this kind of acute censure from the public, it is all the more important that their university is behind them. Carnegie Mellon should have contacted Dr. Anya to monitor her and offer her support. If he released any statement, it should have been a statement defending Dr. Anya’s right to vigorous criticism.

The university’s curtailment of Dr. Anya’s academic freedom is particularly shocking given the painstaking work she has done on academic freedom. In 2020, in response to a political school nomination controversy, Carnegie Mellon President Farnam Jahanian established a Commission on Academic Freedom and Free Speech and released an incredibly nuanced and well-informed report. defense of academic freedom. Here is an exerpt :

Academic freedom…protects the critical exchange of ideas that has sparked scholarly innovation and important conversations about equity and justice, and launched new areas of inquiry unbounded by the sociopolitical context of the era. At the same time, freedom of speech, a cornerstone of our First Amendment-protected democracy, guarantees our right to speak out on matters of public interest in language appropriate to the achievement of our purpose.

The statement goes on to discuss the difficulty and complexity of balancing robust academic and freedom of expression with the need to promote “an inclusive, civil and nurturing environment for all”. He keeps on:

While we facilitate important debate on critical issues, we recognize that in rare instances such speech may be offensive or alienating individuals or groups on campus, even though those individuals or groups have equal freedom to refute the ideas that they oppose, or that are contrary to the values ​​of our community. This tension is heightened in the current American socio-political climate, and all the more so by the accelerated and pervasive impact of technology and social media.

It is immediately apparent that Dr. Jahanian’s statement and Carnegie Mellon’s Sept. 8 tweet were not written by the same person or even by the same department. Dr. Jahanian’s statement is keenly aware of the importance of academic freedom, the complexity of defending it, and the new challenges posed by social media. On the other hand, the tweet does not betray any awareness of these things. This is pure, panicked damage control and deeply at odds with the work of Dr. Jahanian’s commission.

So what exactly put the university into damage control mode? Well, they no doubt get tons of phone calls, emails, and social media posts complaining about Dr. Anya, demanding that she be fired, and withdrawing donations. It’s always a tough storm for a university to ride out, but in the age of social media firestorms, universities need to have good playbooks ready for such outbreaks.

It is also quite possible that they were afraid of losing the support of one of their major donors. In December 2020, Amazon make a donation $2 million to college. Mr. Bezos’ tweet may well have raised alarm bells within the donor relations department even though Amazon did not contact the university directly. Honestly, though, I’d be shocked if Mr. Bezos even knew about the donation. Amazon is worth $1.36 trillion and Mr. Bezos’ personal worth is $151 billion. He was the first centi-billionaire in history. He loses $2 million like most people lose dead skin cells. So he probably wasn’t trying to intimidate the institution. Still, one can imagine the donor relations team was feeling quite anxious when they saw Mr Bezos’ tweet. I’ve written before about how important it is for universities to have good policies and training to ensure that the development side and the academic side understand each other’s roles and maintain good and healthy boundaries.

In the two weeks since Carnegie Mellon’s statement was released, thousands of students and scholars have signed a open letter in solidarity with Dr. Anya. The professor thanked her supporters and reassured them that the university has no intention of firing her.

Is it too late for Carnegie Mellon to do the right thing? Since September 8, they have remained silent about the case on social and traditional media. Perhaps they are waiting for the storm to pass. No doubt they are also having internal conversations about how the case unfolded. Ultimately, if Carnegie Mellon wants to land in the right place, it must issue a retraction, an apology to Dr. Anya, and a statement of strong support for her academic freedom. Allowing her hasty September 8 statement to stand undermines the work of the Commission on Academic Freedom and Free Expression, betrays a black scholar, and sacrifices the university’s scholarly mission to public opinion.

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Indian Navy has signed MoU with Amity University for academic cooperation https://sohamsa.org/indian-navy-has-signed-mou-with-amity-university-for-academic-cooperation/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 09:58:27 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/indian-navy-has-signed-mou-with-amity-university-for-academic-cooperation/ Amity University Uttar Pradesh signed a memorandum of understanding with the Indian Navy establish a long-term relationship for Academic cooperation. The Memorandum of Understanding between Amity University and the Indian Navy will enhance educational qualifications improving the prospect of appropriate nautical assignment “on duty” and better investments in Indian Navy pensions. Bank Maha Pack includes […]]]>

Amity University Uttar Pradesh signed a memorandum of understanding with the Indian Navy establish a long-term relationship for Academic cooperation. The Memorandum of Understanding between Amity University and the Indian Navy will enhance educational qualifications improving the prospect of appropriate nautical assignment “on duty” and better investments in Indian Navy pensions.

Bank Maha Pack includes live bundles, test runs, video lectures and e-books

Key Points Related to the Memorandum of Understanding between Amity University and Indian Navy

  • The memorandum of understanding between Amity University and Indian Navy will conduct tailored courses for the Indian Navy in niche areas.
  • The different areas include 5G and IoT Technology, Control System Integration, AI, Blockchain, Machine Learning, Cryptology, Data Science, Big Data Analytics, Digital Marketing, Computer Networks, Anti-Drone Warfare, Cyber ​​Warfare, Security, Automation, Surveillance and Tracking.
  • It will also help to improve the ‘Erudite Warriors’, who can think better and adapt to future challenges of conflict.
  • These courses will ensure better placements of naval personnel.

Find more deal-related news

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UT Southwestern opens first academic medical center campus for southern Dallas County: Newsroom https://sohamsa.org/ut-southwestern-opens-first-academic-medical-center-campus-for-southern-dallas-county-newsroom/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 15:24:35 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/ut-southwestern-opens-first-academic-medical-center-campus-for-southern-dallas-county-newsroom/ DALLAS – September 17, 2022 – Thousands of residents, business owners and regional leaders gathered on Saturday for the community celebration for the opening of UT Southwestern Medical Center at RedBirdthe largest of its regional campuses and the first to bring academic medicine to the booming South Dallas area. The two-story, 150,000 square foot campus […]]]>




DALLAS – September 17, 2022 – Thousands of residents, business owners and regional leaders gathered on Saturday for the community celebration for the opening of UT Southwestern Medical Center at RedBirdthe largest of its regional campuses and the first to bring academic medicine to the booming South Dallas area.

The two-story, 150,000 square foot campus is UT Southwestern’s sixth regional outpatient medical center offering a host of primary care, cardiac and oncology services. The facility also provides laboratory services, a full-service pharmacy, and advanced imaging technologies such as MRIs and CT scans, as well as women’s health services such as mammography. Specialized care coming later this year includes neurological services from the Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute and a culinary medicine program.

RedBird’s 150,000 square foot UT Southwestern Medical Center offers a host of services, including advanced imaging technologies.

UT Southwestern is ranked among the nation’s top 40 providers for cancer, heart, and neurology care, as well as multiple specialties, including diabetes, gastroenterology, geriatrics, and endocrinology services by US News and World Reports Best hospitals.

“I have been a patient at UT Southwestern for many years and love the doctors. And it’s right down the street from my house – I didn’t have to drive through downtown traffic,” said DeSoto retiree and 25-year UTSW patient Debra J. Wilson. one of the first patients seen at the center. . “I love it. It reminds me so much of downtown UT Southwest.

UT Southwestern at RedBird, located on the east end of the Reinvent RedBird The development facing Camp Wisdom Road near US 67 south of downtown Dallas is expected to help meet the medical needs of patients who live or work in Oak Cliff, DeSoto, Duncanville, Cedar Hill, Lancaster and the surrounding areas in search of the hallmark of UT Southwestern scholars. medical expertise, said John Warner, MD, executive vice president for health system affairs.

“Residents of South Dallas have had a shortage of nearby health care treatment options, and UT Southwestern is eager to help fill that void,” said Dr. Warner, a preventive cardiologist who serves as the system’s CEO. of UT Southwestern Health. “We are committed to building lasting relationships within the community and have engaged those who live and work in the area, so we understand their wide range of health care needs. These conversations have informed our strategy to provide more convenient access to our specialists who work together to ensure the best outcomes and experience for our patients and their families. »

Primary care services at UT Southwestern Medical Center at RedBird also include diabetes and depression management and screening. Cardiology services include preventive and diagnostic care to treat conditions such as hypertension and abnormal heart rhythm. The Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center at UT Southwestern, the only National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive center in the area and ranked among the nation’s top 25 hospitals for cancer services, offers hematology care / oncology, including a suite of new rooms for infusion therapy to treat cancer, sickle cell disease and other diseases. Later this year, the O’Donnell Brain Institute will provide neurological care to RedBird.

Patients can access a phlebotomy lab to collect and test blood and urine specimens, a full-service pharmacy, and mammography and other advanced imaging including MRI, CT scan, ultrasound and radiography.

UT Southwest Culinary Medicine Program will eventually be part of innovative approaches to care available at UT Southwestern Medical Center in RedBird, with an emphasis on community education that empowers people to make diet, nutrition, and healthy foods part of prevention and disease management.

RedBird’s new medical center has both dedicated physicians and healthcare practitioners – some of whom live and grew up in the community and wanted to transfer their practice to the area – as well as physicians who divide their time between RedBird and William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital, recently ranked by US News and World Report as the #1 Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital for the sixth consecutive year.

Ericka Walker Williams, MD, assistant professor of internal medicine and certified in internal medicine and rheumatology, welcomed the first patient – who lives near RedBird. “She had seen me once on main campus before and decided to come here to establish her care,” said Dr. Williams, who specializes in primary and preventative care, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus.

“Residents and businesses have made clear the need for expanded and leading health care services in the community, so we are delighted, not only with the commitment to dozens of essential services tailored specifically to this region, but also of the level of care that UT Southwestern is known for providing,” said Peter Brodsky, majority owner and developer of Reimagine RedBird. “UTSW’s latest announcement further demonstrates the transformational momentum that continues to energize our RedBird project.”

About UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern, one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty has received six Nobel Prizes and includes 26 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 17 members of the National Academy of Medicine, and 14 researchers from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Full-time faculty of more than 2,900 are responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and committed to rapidly translating scientific research into new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide care in more than 80 specialties to more than 100,000 inpatients, more than 360,000 emergency room cases, and oversee nearly 4 million outpatient visits annually.



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Academic mobility program for students returning from Ukraine https://sohamsa.org/academic-mobility-program-for-students-returning-from-ukraine/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 08:55:21 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/academic-mobility-program-for-students-returning-from-ukraine/ The National Medical Commission has certified that medical students who returned from Ukraine can continue their studies in 29 countries under the academic mobility program. The countries are Poland, Austria, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Moldova, Slovakia, Spain, Uzbekistan, United States, Italy, Belgium, Egypt, Belarus, Latvia, Kyrgyzstan, Greece, Romania, Sweden, Israel, Iran, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, […]]]>

The National Medical Commission has certified that medical students who returned from Ukraine can continue their studies in 29 countries under the academic mobility program. The countries are Poland, Austria, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Moldova, Slovakia, Spain, Uzbekistan, United States, Italy, Belgium, Egypt, Belarus, Latvia, Kyrgyzstan, Greece, Romania, Sweden, Israel, Iran, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Germany, Turkey, Croatia and Hungary.

The degree will be issued by Ukrainian universities.

They will get the approval of the National Medical Commission only if the Ukrainian institutes organize academic mobility programs in the institutes of the above-mentioned 29 countries.

Those who complete their studies in this way must pass certain exams to continue their studies in India.

It is only recently that the national medical commission approved the academic mobility program.

Most Ukrainian medical universities started their courses on the 1st of this month.

No opportunities in India: Center
The center informed the Supreme Court that Ukrainian students will not be able to continue their studies in Indian universities. There are no provisions in the National Medical Commission for such a concession. In the affidavit submitted by Health Ministry Secretary Rajesh Bhushan, granting such a concession will affect Indian medical studies.

The low entrance grades obtained while entering medicine in India and inexpensive education expenses abroad are the reasons why students prefer overseas universities. The government has said that if it allows merit-poor students into India’s leading medical colleges, it could lead to further legal action from applicants who were unable to secure a seat in the college.

The government believes that allowing medical admissions in this way will be tantamount to allowing disguised admissions.

Although the plea submitted by the inclusion of the Malayalees regarding the continuation of the studies of the Ukrainian students was considered yesterday, the hearing did not take place.

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Hun School begins 109th school year with appeal for ‘gratitude and kindness’ https://sohamsa.org/hun-school-begins-109th-school-year-with-appeal-for-gratitude-and-kindness/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 01:29:48 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/hun-school-begins-109th-school-year-with-appeal-for-gratitude-and-kindness/ The Hun School celebrated the start of its 109th school year with a whole school convocation. The theme of the day at the Sept. 9 convocation was “gratitude,” according to a press release from The Hun School. High School student speaker Nia Oparaji, Class of 2023 reminded the crowd of the African philosophy of Ubuntu, […]]]>

The Hun School celebrated the start of its 109th school year with a whole school convocation.

The theme of the day at the Sept. 9 convocation was “gratitude,” according to a press release from The Hun School.

High School student speaker Nia Oparaji, Class of 2023 reminded the crowd of the African philosophy of Ubuntu, which roughly translates to “I am because we are”.

“Here at Hun, we are all connected,” she said. “Understand that everyone really cares about you and is there to support you.”

Nia encouraged her classmates to immerse themselves in the school community.

College student lecturer Ryan Spicer, Class of 2027, agreed.

“Hun has been my home and my family,” Ryan said. He encouraged his classmates, including 16 new sixth graders, to have fun and make new friends this year.

Student performer Brendan Kelso, Class of 2023, played guitar and sang an original song, “Sentimental.” The song, he explained, is an expression of gratitude for how Hun helps students grow.

“Now I can see my potential/closer now than it’s ever been,” he sang.

Ted Shaffner, Junior Dean and 2022 Faculty President, explained the importance of gratitude during his keynote address and was specific about “the value of a community like ours.” He referenced Virginia Woolf’s “A Room of One’s Own” and encouraged students to express their gratitude to those on campus who work tirelessly to ensure the conditions in which “little fish ideas” are nurtured.

“So I’m here today because of an award, and I’m proud of what my students have accomplished leading up to this moment, but the merit of the award also belongs to the people who clean the buildings and prepare the food,” he said. .

“It belongs to teachers discussing their creative ideas and struggles in class while playing a board game with me.

“It belongs to the administration and development office that prioritizes the student and teacher experience by creating new science and arts spaces, that funds professional development trips, and that has the vision and ethos working to push big fish ideas like NextTerm that redefine what it means to be educated in the 21st century,” Shaffner said.

After his remarks, Shaffner dubbed the 2022-23 school year “the year of gratitude.”

Gratitude to Hun School Principal, Jon Brougham

In his speech, Shaffner encouraged students to spend time with Brougham, who will retire at the end of the 2022-23 academic year. The two have known each other since before their time in Hun. Brougham hired Shaffner for his first-ever teaching job at a Virginia school before hiring him again at the Hun School.

“Mr. Brougham’s greatest skill is what all teachers seek – the ability to bring out the best in others,” Shaffner said. “He prefers to highlight those around him rather than trumpet his own accomplishments. .”

Shaffner encouraged students to remember that leadership is not a position of power, but of responsibility.

Council President Steve Wills also encouraged students to follow Brougham’s example.

“You can lead with words, but when those words are paired with actions, it makes all the difference,” he said. “By any measure, Mr. Brougham’s tenure has been transformational. Everything is improved, everything is better.

For his 12 years of service as a school principal, Brougham received the John Gale Hun Centennial Medal, which was created to recognize and recognize extraordinary leadership. He is the third person in school history to receive the medal.

A call for kindness

In his welcome address, Brougham addressed the 152 seniors and PGs (high school graduates) directly.

“You are going to run the school with your leadership,” he said. “Our community, we create it and recreate it every day. Between now and June, let’s not forget our responsibility to each other. Let’s be kind to one another.

Shaffner echoed the sentiment.

“Be weird, be grateful, be curious and be kind,” he said.

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Lincoln University adds new academic minors and updates academic policies https://sohamsa.org/lincoln-university-adds-new-academic-minors-and-updates-academic-policies/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 09:01:07 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/lincoln-university-adds-new-academic-minors-and-updates-academic-policies/ Lincoln University adds two new academic minors and implements revamped policies regarding online teaching and academic probation. The historically black university will begin offering 18-hour minors in communications and project management next spring semester. LU’s board of curators approved the two minors on Thursday at its first meeting since the start of the fall semester. […]]]>

Lincoln University adds two new academic minors and implements revamped policies regarding online teaching and academic probation.

The historically black university will begin offering 18-hour minors in communications and project management next spring semester.

LU’s board of curators approved the two minors on Thursday at its first meeting since the start of the fall semester. He also approved new language to reduce the university’s academic probation policy and add new requirements for professors who teach classes online.

Minors do not require any additional faculty, and the Project Management Minor will be offered through the Project Management Institute, a non-profit online professional development organization.

“It gives our students more marketable skills,” said curator Stacia Bradley Brown, chair of the board’s academic affairs committee. “It is also an opportunity for students and non-traditional students to attend Lincoln University to acquire those 18 hours and then enter the job market because you can work in the field of project management without diploma.”

As the university seeks to expand its online offerings, it is adding a policy to ensure faculty are prepared.

Beginning in fall 2023, faculty teaching blended or fully online courses must complete professional development training on how to teach synchronous and asynchronous virtual courses.

The training is provided by Quality Matters, an online nonprofit that Lincoln has used for at least eight years.

Faculty are required to complete the training every seven years, and the vice president of academic affairs will maintain a list of approved professional development programs. No faculty already teaching online courses will be grandfathered, Brown said.

“With the advent of COVID and more courses being delivered online, it kind of made this policy necessary so that everyone is teaching with the same level of expertise,” she said.

“It’s also important as we strive to grow our online presence over the next year,” added university president John Moseley.

The board approved another policy change to reduce the university’s academic suspension period for students with poor academic standing from three years to one year, effective immediately.

Lincoln had previously suspended students for a semester when their GPA fell below a certain threshold the first time, then three years the second time.

“The advantage of a uniform one-year suspension policy is that it is more punitive initially when the student may need more time to reflect and reform, but more lenient later when a student may still be inclined to finish,” Bryan Salmons, who chairs the faculty committee where the policy originated, wrote in a recommendation provided to the board.

Lincoln’s new policy is to notify students that they are on academic probation if their cumulative GPA falls below 2.0, which limits the number of credit hours the student can take to 13.

Students on academic probation also receive additional academic counseling and counseling with the goal of raising their GPA to at least 2.0, which gets them off probation.

Students who do not raise their GPA are suspended for one year and given specific guidelines for readmission.

Readmitted students who again fall below a 2.0 GPA are again suspended for one year.

The university plans to notify students currently on three-year suspension of the policy change as long as they have been away for a year, said Micheal Self, vice president of academic affairs.

See also:

Lincoln University advances campus projects with federal money

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GCU moves six more academic and administrative departments to KSK campus https://sohamsa.org/gcu-moves-six-more-academic-and-administrative-departments-to-ksk-campus/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/gcu-moves-six-more-academic-and-administrative-departments-to-ksk-campus/ LAHORE: In what can be called a major transition at Government College University (GCU), Lahore, six other academic and administrative departments have been completely transferred to the new 370-acre campus located at Kala Shah Kaku (KSK) . Newly moved academic departments include Mathematics, Statistics and Fine Arts, while administrative departments are Treasury, GCU Press and […]]]>

LAHORE: In what can be called a major transition at Government College University (GCU), Lahore, six other academic and administrative departments have been completely transferred to the new 370-acre campus located at Kala Shah Kaku (KSK) .

Newly moved academic departments include Mathematics, Statistics and Fine Arts, while administrative departments are Treasury, GCU Press and Quality Improvement Cell. Last year, five university departments were moved to the new campus.

Professor Dr Asghar Zaidi, VC of GCU, said: “We are at 401+ in the Times Higher Education World Young University Rankings. We are making this transition to ensure that our university continues to thrive and be among the top 100 universities. We must quickly expand our infrastructure and significantly improve our learning processes if we are to compete.

While talking about the facilities and future plans, the VC said, “We have already started an urban forest project in collaboration with various organizations.

Within two years you will see a green campus, we will complete the buildings for the Central Library, Sufi Center, Girls Hostel, Faculty Residences and a University Block which will house six more academic departments. We will also be adding three new buses to our fleet in about a month.

All these departments have decided to shift voluntarily. We use all of our resources to resolve any startup issues. The VC further said that the spacious classrooms, flexible schedules and fresh air in the new campus had no alternative.

Due to the ample space, teacher-student interaction is more frequent than before. Each department has its own library, which was not possible in the old campus. Six seminar libraries and an archive are already operational at the New Campus. Our students will be more productive and bring new and innovative ideas to their research projects.

The VC pointed out that the relocation of the departments would not only develop a new culture in the University, but also contribute significantly to the rapidly developing educational center in the suburbs of Lahore.

Green belts, planned park clean-up: The city administration has decided to launch a major campaign for green belts and parks in the city, in which hundreds of PHA employees will work simultaneously in an area every days.

The decision was made by Lahore Commissioner Muhammad Amir Jan on Sunday while chairing a meeting. He said the process of cleaning the green belts of roads and parks will start at 5 a.m.

He said the PHA should pay the most attention to parks. Commissioner Lahore said all parks should be divided into three tiers and small parks would be the first priority. He said the PHA should make their state equal to Category 1 parks and activate gyms and sports halls attached to the parks. PHA staff should be fully active.

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(OPINION) The Decline of Academic History https://sohamsa.org/opinion-the-decline-of-academic-history/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 15:10:42 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/opinion-the-decline-of-academic-history/ The views expressed in this article belong solely to the author and should not be construed to represent the views of Townsquare Media, News-Talk 1340 KROC-AM and 96.9 FM, or anyone else associated with the organizations. _______________________________ As a high school and college history, geography, and anthropology teacher for nearly 40 years, I experienced the […]]]>

The views expressed in this article belong solely to the author and should not be construed to represent the views of Townsquare Media, News-Talk 1340 KROC-AM and 96.9 FM, or anyone else associated with the organizations.

_______________________________

As a high school and college history, geography, and anthropology teacher for nearly 40 years, I experienced the politicization of history into progressive anti-American themes in textbooks. The educational trend in this direction was accelerated by Professor Howard Zinn’s popular text, “A People’s History of the United States,” read by millions of students and used by thousands of teachers since the 1980s.

Zinn had a huge influence on high school and college students and teachers, pointing out, as Sam Wineburg, professor of educational history at Stanford University, said in an interview with the reporter for Stanford News, David Plotnikoff. Wineberg said Zinn’s textbook had a “far-left perspective, using dubious secondary sources, neglecting alternative perspectives, and emphasizing oppression theory.”

Graduation Hat and Diploma Front View Isolated on White Background.

Michael Burrell

My own introduction to historical study began in the 1950s, when my high school and college history teachers taught positive, patriotic American history, without ignoring, as another social studies course. titled, “The Problems of Democracy”. Since then, in my opinion, too much history has been taught that encourages students to hate and be ashamed of America, though legions of brave teachers have rejected this narrative.

In two August columns, Powerline blog author Steven Hayward discussed the negative emphasis on teaching US history and shared the initially courageous perspective of the liberal historian, Professor James Sweet of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and President of the American Historical Association.

As Mr. Hayward has noted, the positive teaching of history through biography is no longer much practiced by professional historians, but is a popular theme with lay writers. I used this method in my teaching because biography analyzes people in the context of their time, without imposing contemporary politics and the ideologies of the present.

Hayward quoted Professor Sweet: “I am troubled by the historical erasure and narrow politics of contemporary narratives. Doing history with integrity requires us to interpret the past not through the lens of the present, but within the world of our historical actors. History, Sweet continues, “is a way to study the uneven process of change over time”, which Professor Sweet explained requires “resisting the imposition of today’s political ideologies on the past”.

Hayward wondered “how this slight heresy” would “agitate” the politically correct Twitter crowd and cause them to “take their forks” and condemn the publication of this “appalling” article by the AHA.

Steven Hayward was prescient and pursued the subject in his quick follow-up column on Professor Sweet’s apology for his thoughts after heavy criticism from academia. Sweet recanted under fire, regretting “that my Perspectives on History column has aroused anger and consternation among AHA members.” Sweet said her article “did not convey what I intended, and I regret how I alienated colleagues and friends.” Professor Sweet promised to ‘listen and learn’.

Ideological surrender is necessary to survive in the liberal arts academy today. No “diversity” of opinion is allowed by leftists, who preach “diversity” in ethnicity, race and now even gender, but not in speech or thought.

Mr. Hayward summed up the situation: “There was nothing wrong with Professor Sweet’s article and he knows it. Capitulation to a mob on Twitter tells you everything you need to know about the cowardly ‘character’ of the contemporary university.

This intellectual disease first manifested itself in the liberal arts institutions of “higher education”. Unfortunately, the virus has made its way today into the “hard sciences” of medicine and technology, and into our military institutions.

No wonder college enrollment has plummeted and trade school enrollment has boomed. Civics should be taught in schools and colleges, but labeled ‘government’. In my opinion, political “science” should also be widely offered, but also called “government”.

Hopefully, academic integrity and standards will return to the liberal arts and humanities as student enrollment declines, which is understandable and unfortunate.

Listen to Tom every Tuesday and Thursday morning after the 11 a.m. news as he joins Andy Brownell for Rochester Today on News-Talk 1340 KROC-AM and 96.9 FM.

Rochester police investigate apparent murder-suicide

Rochester police investigate apparent murder-suicide

WATCH: See how much gas it cost the year you started driving

To learn more about how gas prices have changed over the years, Stacker calculated the cost of a gallon of gas for each of the past 84 years. Using Bureau of Labor Statistics data (published April 2020), we analyzed the average price of a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline from 1976 to 2020 as well as the consumer price index (CPI) for regular unleaded gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover how much a gallon cost when you first started driving.

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US educational mission to visit India to strengthen bilateral academic ties https://sohamsa.org/us-educational-mission-to-visit-india-to-strengthen-bilateral-academic-ties/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 09:04:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/us-educational-mission-to-visit-india-to-strengthen-bilateral-academic-ties/ On the heels of the United States issuing a record 82,000 visas to Indian students this summer, a U.S. Department of Commerce education trade mission is arriving in India next week to further strengthen academic relations between the two countries, said a senior official. here Friday. US institutions of higher education (HEIs) will explore […]]]>

On the heels of the United States issuing a record 82,000 visas to Indian students this summer, a U.S. Department of Commerce education trade mission is arriving in India next week to further strengthen academic relations between the two countries, said a senior official. here Friday.

US institutions of higher education (HEIs) will explore partnerships with India’s education sector during delegation visits to Mumbai, Bangalore and New Delhi from September 12-16.

The delegation will include representatives from 21 American HEIs from 15 US States who will travel to the three major Indian cities, in the context of India’s New Education Policy-2020.

The development is seen as significant with the US mission in New Delhi and consulates in Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai and Hyderabad issuing visas to more than 82,000 Indian students for this summer.

Officials said Indian students make up almost 20% of all foreign scholars pursuing studies at various levels in the United States.

“American schools are very interested in learning more about the tremendous opportunities that exist in India…This program will help them develop their understanding of the sector and how best to partner and collaborate with Indian institutions,” said said Mike Hankey, US Consul. -General in Mumbai.

He added that the theme of the next trade mission would be to “identify and promote” avenues of collaboration between the HEIs of the two countries.

India’s NEP-2020 laid out an aggressive plan to revamp and expand that country’s higher education system, including giving a boost to research, experiential learning and research. internationalization of programs.

“US HEIs bring a wealth of experience in these areas and have developed best practices that can help India achieve its goals. Three education technology and service providers are joining the program who wish to bring their world-class capabilities here,” Hankey said.

Program participants will participate in expert meetings with Indian HEIs, student recruitment agents, and other stakeholders to learn first-hand what India needs most.

There will be in-person student fairs on September 12 (Mumbai) and September 15 (New Delhi) as part of the program.

The delegation will also call on state and central government leaders, education regulators, business executives, etc., and listen to their views on the needs of the Indian economy and potential solutions that HEIs Americans can offer.

For two days in Mumbai, the delegation will organize a student fair and B2B meetings, participate in Indian university campus tours and site visits, for one day in Bangalore (September 14), it will participate in campus visits and B2B meetings, and for two days in New Delhi, there will be campus tours and a meeting at the US Embassy.

–IANS

sb/dpb

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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