Academic – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ Mon, 16 May 2022 21:39:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sohamsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Academic – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ 32 32 Two Bartlesville seniors named Academic All-Staters https://sohamsa.org/two-bartlesville-seniors-named-academic-all-staters/ Mon, 16 May 2022 21:02:18 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/two-bartlesville-seniors-named-academic-all-staters/ Bartlesville public school seniors Matt Fries and Morgan King have been named Oklahoma 2022 Academic All-Staters, an honor recognizing the top 100 public school seniors in the state. This year, Academic All-Staters were selected from 397 nominations statewide and come from 75 schools in 67 Oklahoma school districts. Fries and King will be honored at […]]]>

Bartlesville public school seniors Matt Fries and Morgan King have been named Oklahoma 2022 Academic All-Staters, an honor recognizing the top 100 public school seniors in the state.

This year, Academic All-Staters were selected from 397 nominations statewide and come from 75 schools in 67 Oklahoma school districts.

Fries and King will be honored at the 36th Annual Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence Academic Awards Celebration on May 21, at the Omni Oklahoma City Hotel.

Fries is an Eagle Scout, Troop 5 Senior Patrol Leader, Troop Guide, and Den Leader. He is Vice Chief, Treasurer and Service President of the Order of the Arrow of Washita Lodge and has received the Order of the Arrow Distinguished Service Award and Founders Award.

Fries is also Vice President of Bartlesville Future Farmers of America, ranking as a 2021 National Finalist for the FFA’s Agricultural Communications Career Development Event. He was a student representative for the 2021 Bartlesville Public School District bond issue and a volunteer with Catholic charities and the Knights of Columbus. Fries is a member of the Environmental Club and enjoys hiking and the outdoors. He plans to study biological systems engineering at Oklahoma State University. His scholarship sponsor is Phillips 66.

A National Merit Finalist and U.S. Presidential Fellowship nominee, King is an Advanced Placement Fellow with Distinction. He is the founder and president of the Bartlesville High School Math Club, a MATHCOUNTS participant and coach, and a qualifier for the American Invitational Mathematics Examination in 2021 and 2022.

King is a member of the Student Superintendent’s Advisory Council and the National Honor Society. He is the first cellist of the symphony orchestra and a university runner and distance runner. King plans to study nuclear engineering at Brigham Young University or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Its scholarship sponsor is ConocoPhillips.

This year’s All-Staters have averaged 33 on the ACT, with six recipients earning a perfect score of 36. King is one of six to achieve a perfect score, according to OFE.

The average GPA of the 100 students was 4.22. Additionally, 28 of this year’s All-Staters are National Merit Semifinalists and one student is a National Hispanic Scholar Semifinalist.

Each of this year’s All-Staters will receive a $1,000 merit-based scholarship and medallion.

“The Academic Awards Banquet is an inspiring, entertaining, and important event that celebrates outstanding student leaders and educators in our public schools,” said Dayna Rowe, Yukon Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence Trustee and Executive Director of Business. externs from Redlands Community College. “We are thrilled to be able to host our first large-scale, in-person event in three years and to come together in a beautiful new location to roll out the red carpet for our honorees.”

The Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence is a nonprofit charitable organization founded in 1985 by then-U.S. Senator David Boren to recognize and encourage academic excellence in Oklahoma public schools.

Through its Academic Awards program, the foundation has awarded more than $5.1 million in merit-based scholarships and cash to honor outstanding graduates as Academic All-Staters and outstanding educators in as Medal of Excellence winners.

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My Hero Academia Cliffhanger Reveals Koichi’s Official Hero Name https://sohamsa.org/my-hero-academia-cliffhanger-reveals-koichis-official-hero-name/ Sun, 15 May 2022 03:38:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/my-hero-academia-cliffhanger-reveals-koichis-official-hero-name/ My hero academia’the official spin-off/prequel series, My Hero Academia: Vigilantes, will end his six-year run in just weeks, but gave Koichi Haimawari an official Pro Hero name on his way out! Ever since Koichi himself was shown talking about a potential retirement, fans viewed each new chapter in the Naruhata War arc as bringing it […]]]>

My hero academia’the official spin-off/prequel series, My Hero Academia: Vigilantes, will end his six-year run in just weeks, but gave Koichi Haimawari an official Pro Hero name on his way out! Ever since Koichi himself was shown talking about a potential retirement, fans viewed each new chapter in the Naruhata War arc as bringing it closer to the end. This was unfortunately confirmed with the final chapter of the series as the manga will soon be coming to an end, but only really started for Koichi himself.

The entire series had seen Koichi working as an unlicensed vigilante hero, and through his work, he had become a major local hero for his small town. But as the fights got even bigger with each new arc, he couldn’t stay so hidden anymore. This was the case with the fight with Number Six, but it was teased in the final chapter that he would join Captain Celebrity as a sidekick and become an official hero in his own right. With the final chapter, it is confirmed that he is now called “The Skycrawler” as a professional hero operating in New York.

(Photo: Shueisha)

Chapter 125, the penultimate chapter of My Hero Academia: Vigilantes, confirms that a few months have passed since the fight with Number Six and the fallout has changed Naruhata himself a bit. Koichi’s old building was demolished, Kazuho Haneyama went to rehab to regain his physical abilities, and she explains that Koichi feels like he’s the same. But cutting to Koiichi himself in the chapter’s final moments reveals that he’s working in New York at Captain Celebrity’s official headquarters.

It is here that Koichi is seen ready to deploy and take off from the roof of the building, and he is referred to as “CCC-02 The Skycrawler” as he does. This title not only reveals that his official hero name has now changed to the “Skycrawler” to reflect his new flight abilities acquired in the Number Six fight, but also the codename teases that he had become one of the best sidekicks. of Captain Celebrity and a powerful hero in the American system in its own right.

What do you think? What do you think of this first look at Koichi’s official pro hero career? What do you think of his hero name? Are you ready for vigilantes finish his race? Let us know all your thoughts on this in the comments! You can even contact me directly about all things anime and other cool stuff @Valdezology on Twitter!

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Mariposa County High School Academic Boosters Club Celebrates MCHS Staff During Appreciation Week https://sohamsa.org/mariposa-county-high-school-academic-boosters-club-celebrates-mchs-staff-during-appreciation-week/ Fri, 13 May 2022 12:51:58 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/mariposa-county-high-school-academic-boosters-club-celebrates-mchs-staff-during-appreciation-week/ Mariposa County High School celebrated Staff Appreciation Week May 2-6 May 13, 2022 – To show appreciation for the dedication that MCHS staff members have given to students, families, and the entire school community during another extraordinarily difficult year, the MCHS Academic Boosters Club presented grades thank you cards and $20 gift cards to local […]]]>

Mariposa County High School celebrated Staff Appreciation Week May 2-6

May 13, 2022 – To show appreciation for the dedication that MCHS staff members have given to students, families, and the entire school community during another extraordinarily difficult year, the MCHS Academic Boosters Club presented grades thank you cards and $20 gift cards to local refreshment spots to teachers, aides, counselors, administrators, office staff and caretakers.

Staff could choose a gift card from Pony Expresso, Sticks Coffee, The Alley or The Grove House.

“Thank you, MCHS staff for all you do! » said ABC board chair Jill Harry. “We appreciate you. We hope you all enjoy yourselves. You deserve it!”

“Everyone was really happy and surprised,” said Collette Cole, Colleges, Careers and Community Liaison. Ms. Cole helped deliver thank you notes and gift cards on behalf of ABC.

Judy Boyer (above), who supports everyone at MCHS, seems happy to receive a thank you note and gift card from ABC.
ABC IMG 8441Special education teachers Courtney Landrum and Robin Dormer (above) smile as they choose gift cards for The Grove House.
ABC IMG 8443Even with a mask on, you can tell teacher Alex Keeton (above) is smiling.
ABC IMG 8444Physics teacher Ben Jewell and math helper Nathan Savig (above) are very pleased with the appreciation ABC has shown.
ABC IMG 8438Danny Ellis, teacher on special assignment and acting athletic director (above), picked out a gift card for The Alley.
ABC IMG 8442English teacher Gianna Hays (above) will enjoy a trip to Sticks Coffee
ABC IMG 2060

ABC purchased gift cards (above) at four local food outlets to show appreciation to MCHS staff and give them a choice of where they would like to go and enjoy a special thank you gift.

MCHS Academic Boosters Club, Inc. (ABC) is a 501(c)3 organization whose mission is to supplement and enrich the academic experiences and provide educational tools for high school students in Mariposa County.

For more information, visit mchsabc.orgContact abc.mchs@gmail.com“Like” ABC on Facebook: MCHS Academic Boosters Clubor follow MCHS_ABC on instagram or Twitter.

Source: MCHS Academic Boosters Club

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Join the Academic Standards Exam for English, Mathematics https://sohamsa.org/join-the-academic-standards-exam-for-english-mathematics/ Wed, 11 May 2022 13:12:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/join-the-academic-standards-exam-for-english-mathematics/ BISMARCK, ND, May 10, 2022 – State School Superintendent Kirsten Baesler said educators in North Dakota will begin drafting new learning standards for math and English Language Arts/Literacy for K-12 students across the state this summer. The Department of Public Instruction invites North Dakota educators interested in participating in the standards-writing process to visit the […]]]>

BISMARCK, ND, May 10, 2022 – State School Superintendent Kirsten Baesler said educators in North Dakota will begin drafting new learning standards for math and English Language Arts/Literacy for K-12 students across the state this summer.

The Department of Public Instruction invites North Dakota educators interested in participating in the standards-writing process to visit the K-12 Education Content Standards Page on the NDDPI website. Applications are posted under English Language Arts/Literacy and Mathematics K-12 menus. Completed applications should be emailed to dpiacademicsupp@nd.gov by May 31.

The standards provide a framework for what students in North Dakota should know and be able to do at specific times as they progress through the K-12 education system. They were last updated in 2017. The standards are typically revised every five to seven years, Baesler said.

North Dakota schools use the standards to shape their programs. Typically, content standards describe what students are expected to learn by the end of a school year, while curriculum is a more detailed daily plan and resources for teaching that knowledge. The school board, administrators, and teachers in each school district control the curriculum development process.

Separate committees will write the math and English/literacy standards. In the 2017 updates for both sets of standards, 38 educators were on the Mathematics Standards team, while the English Language Arts/Literacy team had 33 educators. Editorial boards included educators from all grades, school sizes, and geographic areas in North Dakota.

Newly formed committees will analyze the current situation in North Dakota English and math standards, review the results of a survey of North Dakota teachers about them, and review information provided by outside experts. The initial draft of the updated standards will be released for public comment, and a Content Standards Review Board made up of parents, business people and the general public will review the draft. The members of the review committee will be chosen at a later date.

“Our North Dakota Constitution demands that the state provide a uniform system of free public schools throughout the state,” Baesler said. “Our state academic content standards provide a common benchmark for student learning while leaving instructional control in the hands of our locally elected school boards, administrators, and educators.”

North Dakota’s Superintendent of Public Instruction regularly reviews state learning standards under the direction of the state legislature, which lists oversight of “course content standards development” among the duties from the office. (NDCC 15.1-02-04 (3)).

A separate committee of educators updates North Dakota library and technology standards and seek public comment on them. the initial draft of updated library and technology standards is posted on the Ministry of Public Instruction website. They were last revised in 2012.

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VSU honors Vanessa Okojie with 2022 Annie Powe Hopper, Outstanding Student Awards https://sohamsa.org/vsu-honors-vanessa-okojie-with-2022-annie-powe-hopper-outstanding-student-awards/ Mon, 09 May 2022 21:03:19 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/vsu-honors-vanessa-okojie-with-2022-annie-powe-hopper-outstanding-student-awards/ May 9, 202222-73 Jessica PopeCommunications and Media Relations Coordinator Kasmira Smith, intern student Vanessa Okojie is pictured with her parents, Joseph and Clarice Okojie. Vanessa Okojie is pictured with Dr. Robert Smith, provost and vice president of academic affairs, and Dr. Richard A. Carvajal, president of Valdosta State University. Vanessa Okojie is pictured with Dr […]]]>

May 9, 2022
22-73

Jessica Pope
Communications and Media Relations Coordinator

Kasmira Smith, intern student

Vanessa Okojie is pictured with her parents, Joseph and Clarice Okojie.

52038026663_ebd3abec2e_k.jpg
Vanessa Okojie is pictured with Dr. Robert Smith, provost and vice president of academic affairs, and Dr. Richard A. Carvajal, president of Valdosta State University.

52038223004_d39c8dac52_k.jpgVanessa Okojie is pictured with Dr Mark Smith, Associate Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences; Dr. Robert Smith, provost and vice president of academic affairs; and Dr. Richard A. Carvajal, president of Valdosta State University.

VALDOSTA — Vanessa Okojie of McDonough, Georgia is the recipient of the 2022 Annie Powe Hopper Award from Valdosta State University.

“Receiving the Annie Powe Hopper Award is a surreal and humbling way to end my time at VSU,” she said. “To represent the university, my family, my college and the village who supported me in receiving this, it is incredible. I give all the glory to God, who has directed all my steps so far.

Recognized as the highest honor bestowed on a VSU student, the Annie Powe Hopper Award is presented annually to a senior who represents the university’s high academic standards and exemplifies its traditions of excellence. It was first introduced on May 2, 1962, and is named for the institution’s first dean, who arrived at what was then known as South Georgia State Normal College in 1920 as a teacher. .

South Georgia State Normal College became a four-year institution in 1922 and the name was changed to Georgia State Womans College. As the doyen of women, Hopper insisted on proper etiquette in everything from demeanor to dress. She believed that a college education provided students with the opportunity to gain a higher level of knowledge and pursue advanced critical thinking processes, and she guided her female students to make noble and meaningful choices in their lives. She retired in 1943, seven years before the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia declared the institution coeducational and changed the name to Valdosta State College.

Okojie also won VSU’s 2022 Humanities and Social Sciences Outstanding Student Award, which is given to a College of Humanities and Social Sciences student with a record of academic excellence and distinguished service within and to outside the classroom.

Okojie received a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science summa cum laude at VSU’s 233rd launch ceremony on May 7.

Okojie plans to spend a year working in the legal department of a financial start-up to gain experience before going to law school. She solidified her career goals after completing an internship at the law firm of John D. Holt PC.

As a student, Okojie served as the chairman of the forensic science (speech and debate) team at VSU. She was nationally ranked fourth best debater by the Junior Varsity International Public Debate Association from 2020 to 2021. She served as Vice President and President of the Alpha Beta Mu Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha: The National Honor Society for Political Science. She was appointed director of academic affairs for the Student Government Association and chosen to serve on University Council Plus.

She has presented research at the VSU Undergraduate Research Symposium and the Georgia Political Science Association Annual Conference. She presented more research at the Midwest Political Science Association’s 79th Annual Conference in Chicago, Illinois, in April. His research covers a variety of topics, from presidential power gains to electoral successes to educational disparities.

Okojie’s commitment to academic, leadership and research excellence has earned him multiple Dean’s List honors, Georgia Power Recruiting and Retention Scholarship, Regents’ President’s Scholarship Choice, Debate Team Scholarship, and 2022 University System of Georgia Academic Recognition Day Award. She was a finalist for the David W. Winder Prize for Best Paper from the Department of Political Science.

Okojie, 21, is the daughter of Joseph and Clarice Okojie.

On the Web:
https://www.valdosta.edu/chss/

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Husker’s college journey guided by mentorship | Nebraska today https://sohamsa.org/huskers-college-journey-guided-by-mentorship-nebraska-today/ Fri, 06 May 2022 05:25:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/huskers-college-journey-guided-by-mentorship-nebraska-today/ Mentorship, both given and received, has been a hallmark of Kristlin Mogensen Bright’s college experience. Bright will receive his master’s degree in counseling psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln commencement ceremonies on May 13. She will soon begin her career as a licensed psychotherapist in private practice. While pursuing her master’s degree, she served as […]]]>

Mentorship, both given and received, has been a hallmark of Kristlin Mogensen Bright’s college experience.

Bright will receive his master’s degree in counseling psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln commencement ceremonies on May 13. She will soon begin her career as a licensed psychotherapist in private practice.

While pursuing her master’s degree, she served as a Graduate Assistant in Education Talent Search for TRIO Programs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She visited each of Lincoln’s public high schools weekly to help eligible seniors plan for college, urging them to complete the free application for federal student aid, reminding them to register for an entrance exam to college, brainstorming references and helping them write scholarship essays. .

Many students don’t have someone in their family who can show them the ropes of getting into college and succeeding after they arrive.

Bright’s life experience taught her how important it is for these students to have someone like her.

For example, his father was a good student. He served as valedictorian and class president for his senior class which earned a full scholarship to college. But he dropped out the first year and got a job. He told her that if he had had someone to help him, he might have been able to continue his studies.

While attending South Sioux City High School, Bright had a mentor through the TeamMates program founded by former Husker coach and athletic director Tom Osborne. This mentor supported her on her journey to seek an education at all costs – even when it meant sacrificing social activities.

“It wasn’t that my parents weren’t interested in my schooling, my dad really wanted us to go to school. But he had three jobs and he didn’t have time,” she said. “I knew going to college was my own responsibility.”

Her high school counselors, who knew her TeamMates mentor, helped her connect with the W.H. Thompson Scholars Program, which combines a Susan T. Buffett Foundation major scholarship with an on-campus learning community. They helped her find other scholarships that practically paid the full cost of her undergraduate degree.

“I didn’t know how much college cost — and I didn’t know how important scholarships could be,” she said.

Her boyfriend, now husband, Casey Bright also guided her. Kristlin and Casey both graduated in the top 5% of their class at South Sioux City. The couple started dating when they were 15 and married in 2019.

“I asked him ‘what are you doing now,’ and he said, ‘write up scholarships,'” she recalls. “So I copied it.”

Kristlin and Casey wed shortly after their undergraduate debut in May 2019. In August, they embarked on a nine-month international trip, spending more than three months in Europe, four months in Asia and one month in Australia. They had saved for the trip by working at the university.

Bright decided during the trip that she would pursue her master’s degree. She passed the Graduate Record Examinations in France.

Mentors had helped her get the undergraduate record she needed to be considered for graduate school.

As an undergrad, she worked in Rebecca Brock’s Family Development Lab, following advice she received from Alyssa Bischmann, her teacher for a third-grade educational psychology course. year. Bischmann asked about her educational goals and told her that she would need research and clinical experience even to be considered for graduate school.

“I never would have known this as a first-generation college student, and I didn’t have anyone close to me that I could ask these questions,” Bright said. “She revealed the assumptions that higher education has for students, such as students need to know that they need to do research before going to graduate school and that they need clinical experiences before going to college. be considered for graduate studies.”

Later, as Bright prepared her applications for graduate school, she again turned to Bischmann for help.

“She helped me write my personal statement in a way that would be appealing to professors reading it,” Bright said. “I had no idea how else to write it and I don’t think I could have gotten into graduate school without his guidance.”

Bright, who served on Nebraska’s First Generation Advisory Board, said she was blessed to have some incredible mentors in her life.

“Academia can be a kind of secret language,” she said. “I’m lucky to be the kind of person who asks questions to anyone who wants to listen, but not all the first generations. I think this highlights the importance of first generation programs and their work in reaching and supporting first generation students.

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Graduate Students Celebrate Academic Achievement Upon Graduation | Imperial News https://sohamsa.org/graduate-students-celebrate-academic-achievement-upon-graduation-imperial-news/ Wed, 04 May 2022 07:15:46 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/graduate-students-celebrate-academic-achievement-upon-graduation-imperial-news/ More than 3,000 students will graduate today in three ceremonies at the Royal Albert Hall. The ceremonies mark the achievements of Imperial’s postgraduate students who completed their courses between March 2021 and March 2022. For the first time since the pandemic began, friends and family of graduates will be able to attend ceremonies and post-ceremony […]]]>





More than 3,000 students will graduate today in three ceremonies at the Royal Albert Hall.

The ceremonies mark the achievements of Imperial’s postgraduate students who completed their courses between March 2021 and March 2022.

For the first time since the pandemic began, friends and family of graduates will be able to attend ceremonies and post-ceremony receptions. All three ceremonies will also be streamed live for those unable to attend.

You worked hard for this momentous occasion and deserved these celebrations today Professor Ian Walmsley Provost, Imperial College London

Addressing the graduates, Provost, Professor Ian Walmsley said: “I want to salute our graduates for your success. Congratulations. You have worked hard for this momentous occasion and you have earned these celebrations today.

“Any degree is a great achievement, but you came to this one after going through extraordinary circumstances: the last two years have been exceptional, unprecedented and unforeseen.”

More information on the ceremonies can be found in the College’s Graduation FAQs.

Honorary degrees

Five honorary degrees will be awarded as part of the graduation ceremonies.

Sir Samuel E. Jonah KBE, OSG

Sir Samuel E. Jonah is Executive Chairman of Jonah Capital and Chancellor of the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. Sir Samuel earned a master’s degree in mining management from Imperial Oil in 1979 before joining Ashanti Goldfields Corporation. He became CEO of the company in 1986 and is credited with overseeing its growth from a single mine operation to a multinational enterprise.

Dervilla Mitchell CBE

Dervilla Mitchell is Vice President of Arup. Dervilla is an eminent structural engineer who leads major projects around the world. She was lead design engineer for Heathrow Terminal 5 in London, Europe’s largest construction site at the time, and led the Portcullis House project in Westminster, as well as Arup’s contribution to the Athletes’ Village. London Olympics.

Professor Sir Peter Knight

Professor Sir Peter Knight is a senior research scientist in Imperial’s Department of Physics. Sir Peter is renowned for his pioneering research in quantum optics. As Dean of the Faculty of Natural Sciences and later as Vice-Rector (Research), Sir Peter was responsible for determining research priorities, new programs and initiatives for the College, including those that led to the creation from the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Institute for Shock Physics.

Professor Sir John Savill

Professor Sir John Savill is Regius Professor of Medical Science at the Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh. He is one of the UK’s leading clinical academics, internationally recognized for his research in apoptosis and immunology. He has made many profound contributions to medical research and clinical training, which was recognized when he was appointed Chief Scientist for the Scottish Government’s Health Directorates in 2008.

Lady Kate Bingham

Dame Kate Bingham is managing partner at SV Health Investors and former chair of the UK COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force. She co-leads the SV Biotech Franchise, which builds high-value companies that develop transformational new medicines from discovery to commercialization. Dame Kate also sits on the board of the Francis Crick Institute and has been a member of Imperial’s Business School Advisory Board for several years, a role in which she judges the WE Innovate Awards.

Imperial College Medals

Eight Imperial College Medals will be awarded at the graduation ceremony. Medals are awarded to members of the Imperial Community for meritorious or commendable service to the College.

Professor Maggie Dallman

Professor Maggie Dallman OBE is Vice President (International), Associate Vice President (Academic Partnerships) and Professor of Immunology at Imperial. Professor Dallman is a world leader in research aimed at understanding how inappropriate immunity and inflammation lead to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases. She directs the Dallman Lab, is Director and Trustee of the Francis Crick Institute and has served on the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

Professor Alison McGregor

Professor Alison McGregor is Professor of Musculoskeletal Biodynamics in Imperial’s Department of Surgery and Cancer and Director of Undergraduate Science in the Faculty of Medicine. She is a world-renowned researcher on the mechanisms, effects and management of injury. This work has had a great impact on the performance of elite athletes, including his rowing performance research which contributed to the success of Team GB at the London 2012 Olympics.

Joanna Thompson

Joanna is a department head at Imperial’s School of Medicine. She joined the College in 1994 and has worked in several departments of the faculty, holding her first position as Department Head for Neuroscience in 2009. She then became Division Head for Immunology and Inflammation and in 2019 she joined the new department. metabolism, digestion and reproduction. In this current role, she oversees the running of all operations and facilities for various research groups that were previously in other departments.

Dr Benita Cox

Dr Benita Cox is Senior Faculty Tutor and Program Director for the Masters in International Health Management program at Imperial College Business School. Dr. Cox’s research focuses on the role of information systems in health care delivery, particularly the impact of information and communication technologies on health care practice. She has published extensively in this area and consulted extensively in a number of industries, including pharmaceuticals.

Jon Hancock

Jon Hancock served as Head of Imperial’s Central Secretariat until his retirement in 2019. He was an outstanding servant to the College for 20 years. In his role, Jon had primary responsibility for the College’s governance arrangements. In addition to providing highly professional service to Council and its committees, he was the custodian of the College’s governance documents.

Nick Moakes

Nick Moakes is Chief Investment Officer at Wellcome Trust, where he is responsible for a £38billion global portfolio that funds the Trust’s mission to solve the pressing health issues facing everyone. He has lent his expertise to Imperial College London Endowment Board for over a decade. For the past few years, Nick has guided the Board of Directors as Chairman, during which time he modernized the staffing for a strong future.

Professor Nelson Phillips

Prior to his retirement in 2021, Professor Nelson Phillips was Professor of Innovation and Strategy, Co-Director of the Center for Responsible Leadership and Associate Dean for External Relations at Imperial College Business School. Professor Phillips is a distinguished scholar who has made essential contributions to the growth of the business school. His research focuses on understanding the evolution of institutions, entrepreneurship in emerging markets, and the impact of technology on strategy and innovation.

Jon Tucker

Jon Tucker was Director of Faculty Operations at Imperial College Business School for 13 years until his retirement in February 2022. Mr Tucker was instrumental in transforming the scale and ambition of business school since his appointment in early 2009. Prior to that he held various senior positions at Lloyds Bank and later at the Science Museum London.

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Is academic freedom slowly dying? – Six mile post https://sohamsa.org/is-academic-freedom-slowly-dying-six-mile-post/ Mon, 02 May 2022 09:06:16 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/is-academic-freedom-slowly-dying-six-mile-post/ Christopher Daniel Some states have passed religious legislation that would prohibit public schools from teaching certain subjects to students. In recent years, several states have attempted or succeeded in passing bills to restrict the curriculum in their public schools.From Critical Race Theory to Evolution, from Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” Bill to Indiana’s “Concepts of Division” […]]]>

Christopher Daniel

Some states have passed religious legislation that would prohibit public schools from teaching certain subjects to students.

In recent years, several states have attempted or succeeded in passing bills to restrict the curriculum in their public schools.
From Critical Race Theory to Evolution, from Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” Bill to Indiana’s “Concepts of Division” Bill HB 1134, these pieces of legislation aim to do one thing : advancing a strict conservative agenda.
This motivation can be traced to what sociologist Charles Wright Mills has called the power elite, in which a group of powerful individuals maintain their control of power by creating situations and laws that keep everyone in the same position. socioeconomic.
Education is a powerful tool. Abolitionist and social reformer Frederick Douglass wrote that learning to read and write meant the difference between being a slave and a free man.
What value is education if it does not encompass all aspects of a given subject? The most important benefit of education is the wide range of options it gives us. Without education, the human mind tends to stay in the same battered way.
Public schools across the country do not have information, such as parts of the story, as part of their curriculum. It is up to the students to find this information on their own, either by exploring the internet or by taking university courses.
When laws are passed that restrict the curriculum used in our public schools, that power is diminished. Governments understand this and use it to their long-term advantage. It is sad that we continue to elect the same type of people.
The worst part of this power grab is that the future of the children is at stake. Although they are only a secondary consideration, they are the ones who will lose the most from these restrictions on what their experience of life will consist of. learning.
Children will have an uphill battle to untie the knot that binds their minds that are bound by the framing of their upbringing.
It is the parents, or at least their votes, that are the primary consideration in this type of legislative jargon. They are, of course, worried about the future of their children and are therefore prepared to believe the worst of the public school system.
Our politicians want us to believe in the craziest ideas. We are told that kindergarten teachers teach children about human sexuality instead of how to read and write, and that if students learn the theory of evolution, they are doomed to become militant atheists.
This type of brainwashing works because it has become a sinister cycle that influences voting and drives this type of terrible legislation.
What is the solution to this problem? How can we end this cycle of uneducated citizens and bring true freedom, both social and economic, to a half-blind population? Voting is the answer.
In his farewell speech, the first US President George Washington warned the nation to stay away from bipartisan politics, as he understood that it is human nature for people to come together with other like-minded people. the same ideas and create an echo chamber.
American citizens must stop falling into the abyss of the “us versus them” mentality. Stop voting for candidates based on whether they have an “R” or a “D” next to their name.
People between the ages of 18 and 40 need to become more informed and politically active. It is high time for us to wake up and end the nightmare of draconian legislation that enriches some and impoverishes others.

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SSCC Appoints Dr. Erika Goodwin Vice President of Academic Affairs https://sohamsa.org/sscc-appoints-dr-erika-goodwin-vice-president-of-academic-affairs/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 17:06:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/sscc-appoints-dr-erika-goodwin-vice-president-of-academic-affairs/ Press release Southern State Community College has announced that Dr. Erika Goodwin has been named its next Vice President of Academic Affairs effective June 1, 2022. She will replace Dr. Nicole Roades who was named the College’s 6th President. Goodwin comes to South State from Wilmington College where she had a 27-year career as […]]]>

Press release

Southern State Community College has announced that Dr. Erika Goodwin has been named its next Vice President of Academic Affairs effective June 1, 2022. She will replace Dr. Nicole Roades who was named the College’s 6th President. Goodwin comes to South State from Wilmington College where she had a 27-year career as a senior staff member, most recently Provost and Chief of Staff, and as a full professor of sports science and sports training.

“I am honored and thrilled to begin this appointment and to work with Dr. Roades, the faculty, staff and students of Southern State and to have some overlap with Dr. Kevin Boys as he leaves the presidency to to retire. I have been fortunate to work with Dr. Boys and Dr. Roades over the years on joint projects for our respective institutions and have great respect for them and the work they do in the college sector. community. I had a wonderful career at Wilmington College and will miss my colleagues and students, but this opportunity will open the next chapter in my career in higher education and I am excited to begin my work with Southern State.

“I am beyond excited to begin working with Dr. Goodwin as part of the Southern State team. I am delighted that she has chosen to share her vast experience and expertise with us and our students – June 1 cannot come fast enough,” commented Dr Roades.

Goodwin is a longtime resident of Clinton County and has strong ties to southwestern Ohio. “I have often said that it was not a job for me but my vocation. My roots and passion run deep in higher education, and I am particularly drawn to Southern State’s mission to “provide an accessible, affordable, and high-quality education for people in Southern Ohio.” I embrace Southern State’s values ​​of Community Involvement, Personal Connection, Unity, and Life Enrichment.

Dr. Goodwin served as acting president of Wilmington College in 2020, the first woman to hold the position. She was also a long-time Vice President of Academic Affairs and Strategic Initiatives/Dean of Faculty (2011-2020) at Wilmington College. She also served Wilmington as an accreditation liaison with its regional accreditor, the Higher Learning Commission. She will also play this role for the Southern State. Additionally, Goodwin is a peer reviewer with the Higher Learning Commission, Chicago, Illinois.

Goodwin is an alumnus of Southern State Community College where she studied to become an emergency medical technician (EMT) after earning her BS from Wilmington College in athletic training and a master’s degree from Wright State University. She got her doctorate. in Higher Education Administration and Athletic Training from the Union Institute and University.

Her tenure as a longtime member of the Wilmington faculty is underscored by the fact that she has co-authored over 200 athletic training student research projects (2004-2022), over 120 have been presented at state, district, and national conferences and/or have been published. She was inducted into Clinton County’s Outstanding Women in 2015 and a member of Clinton Leadership, Class of 2010.

“I look forward to working with Southern State’s leadership team as they transition from their chairman and I take on a new role as vice chairman. I look forward to helping them carry out their current strategic plan which focuses on enrollment and market expansion, increasing student persistence and success, and improving financial health. of the establishment.

Goodwin and her husband, Brad, live on a farm just north of Wilmington with their daughters, Emily and Gracie.

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Sonoma State Academic Senate Proposes Vote of No Confidence in Speaker Sakaki https://sohamsa.org/sonoma-state-academic-senate-proposes-vote-of-no-confidence-in-speaker-sakaki/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 22:49:39 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/sonoma-state-academic-senate-proposes-vote-of-no-confidence-in-speaker-sakaki/ Sonoma State’s nearly 500 faculty members will weigh in on President Judy Sakaki’s leadership in the second week of May, after the Academic Senate approved the launch of a no-confidence vote on Thursday. The vote took place just before the faculty heard Sakaki’s fullest defense of his presidency, which she offered in a pre-recorded video […]]]>

Sonoma State’s nearly 500 faculty members will weigh in on President Judy Sakaki’s leadership in the second week of May, after the Academic Senate approved the launch of a no-confidence vote on Thursday.

The vote took place just before the faculty heard Sakaki’s fullest defense of his presidency, which she offered in a pre-recorded video released just before the meeting ended.

The vote on the no-confidence vote for professors will open on May 6 and end on May 13, according to the timetable set during the Senate meeting. A vote of no confidence is largely symbolic, as it elicits no action beyond the expression of the will of the voting faculty.

Sakaki is embroiled in a scandal stemming from a January settlement paid to a former SSU provost who said she faced retaliation after she gave California State University officials reports of alleged sexual harassment by the president’s ex-husband, lobbyist Patrick McCallum.

The CSU paid former provost Lisa Vollendorf and her attorneys $600,000 to settle the retaliation allegations, The Press Democrat first reported April 13.

Sonoma State will pay approximately $250,000 of the sum from campus funds raised from student tuition, fees, and other sources. The rest will be covered by CSU’s shared insurance pool.

Sakaki was not present at the Academic Senate meeting on Thursday, on the recommendation of faculty president Lauren Morimoto, but she recorded a video message discussing the vote of no confidence and the circumstances leading up to it.

“I take responsibility for my role in this situation, and I pledge to do everything possible to learn the lessons and do everything possible to avoid a recurrence,” Sakaki said. “I apologized unreservedly, but the concept of accountability and the spirit of fairness would also dictate a review of the totality of what my team and I have accomplished over the past five years.”

She highlighted milestones achieved under her tenure, such as Sonoma State’s largest graduating class in 2019 and its designation as a Hispanic-serving institution and subsequent grants awarded to the school.

Ahead of Thursday’s Academic Senate meeting, approximately 150 Students and faculty at Sonoma State University protested on the Rohnert Park campus. Their overarching message was displayed on signs and echoed with chants: Restore SSU.

Faculty, staff and students began their demonstration at noon in Seawolf Plaza, beating on makeshift drums made of buckets and clanking improvised maracas made of two cups stuck together.

After brief speeches from several faculty members, the group then marched once around Darwin Hall, chanting phrases such as, “Get us out of this storm. SSU reform!

Calls to action for Sonoma state administrators largely focused on three topics, with demands to overhaul the office overseeing Title IX compliance garnering the biggest responses from the crowd. Title IX is the federal law that prohibits discrimination based on sex in education.

They also called for greater faculty involvement in campus governance and prioritizing student needs in the school’s bid to cut costs amid a $15-17 million budget shortfall. .

“We’re here for you. That will continue to be true,” said Lynne Morrow, faculty member of the music department. “We’re here for you, and we want to encourage you to make your voice heard as well.”

Check back for updates on this developing story.

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