Honor student – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 13:48:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sohamsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Honor student – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ 32 32 ALL IN Recognizes 2022 Student Vote Honor Roll https://sohamsa.org/all-in-recognizes-2022-student-vote-honor-roll/ Tue, 17 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/all-in-recognizes-2022-student-vote-honor-roll/ Following historic college student vote rates in the 2020 election, student vote champions are preparing fellow students at colleges and universities across the country for the 2022 midterm elections. The ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge (ALL IN ) is honored to recognize a nationwide cohort of student vote champions who have worked to institutionalize nonpartisan […]]]>

Following historic college student vote rates in the 2020 election, student vote champions are preparing fellow students at colleges and universities across the country for the 2022 midterm elections. The ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge (ALL IN ) is honored to recognize a nationwide cohort of student vote champions who have worked to institutionalize nonpartisan democratic engagement and increase college student voter turnout through the 2022 ALL IN Student Vote Honor Roll.

ALL IN is proud to recognize 82 students from 29 states on its 2022 ALL IN Student Vote Honor Roll for their nonpartisan voter engagement efforts for state and local elections in 2021. These students represent both college and private and public universities, historically black colleges and universities. , minority and Hispanic-serving institutions, and community colleges across the country. Additionally, these students have served or been supported by partner organizations such as the Andrew Goodman Foundation, Campus Compact Newman Fellowship, Fair Election Center Campus Voting Project, civic influencers, and PIRG students.

ALL IN recognized students with national awards at the ALL IN Awards Ceremonies in 2017, 2019, and 2021 with Individual Outstanding Student Awards and recognized 25 additional students on previous student voting honor lists. With an increasing number of campuses participating in ALL IN and a commensurate increase in student nominations for these limited recognition opportunities, ALL IN has expanded the ALL IN Student Voting Honor Roll so that any institution participating in ALL IN can nominate one student to be recognized each year. spring.

Below is a snapshot of the work of some of the student vote champions recognized on the Honor Roll:

The Student Candidate of Hobart and William Smith Colleges (NY) Kate Equinozzi“leveraged social media, created engaging programs, and connected across campus and community networks to increase voter registration and turnout in the 2020 presidential election.”

According to the nominator, Alabama A&M University’s Yasmine Amaya Reden,

“demonstrated a full commitment to voter registration and student-centered civic engagement efforts. It organizes weekly voter registration campaigns on “Every Sunny Wednesday”. She leads workshops on gerrymandering, the democratic process and understanding the ballot.

The winner of Northampton Community College (PA), Taiba Sultana“worked closely with the Center for Civic and Community Engagement (CCCE) in the planning, promotion and implementation of civic and democratic engagement activities, including a Halloween Get-Out Party -The-Vote, interactive forums, information sessions, a student service project Democracy 101 presentations and sessions. She has also played an important role in the CCCE’s new #BeEngaged campaign initiative which highlights the NCC’s ongoing commitment to civic responsibility and leadership.

Allegany College of Maryland Allen Brown worked “diligently to advocate for students’ right to vote, helped them register to vote on request, and explored with them why it is so important that every student vote.”

Husbaan SheikhSUNY honors student Stony Brook, “has played a central role in all aspects of nonpartisan, campus-wide civic engagement efforts. He has been a leader during voter registration sessions from Stony Brook to Orientation, helping to enroll thousands of new students each year and has spent the majority of this academic year transforming the Center for Civic Justice’s social media and web content to keep students informed about upcoming elections and time limit. .”

See the full list of 2022 Student Vote Champions here.

ALL IN congratulates our 2022 Student Vote Honor Roll winners, as these Student Vote Champions have increased student voter turnout on college and university campuses across the country. As we prepare for the 2022 midterm elections, we recognize the importance of students leading the way in increasing nonpartisan student democratic engagement and voter turnout. We look forward to another dynamic, voter turnout story in the upcoming mid-sessions.

Over 880 colleges and universities are currently participating in the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge. Learn more about ALL IN and donate to advance our work here.

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How Student Loans Work: A Beginner’s Guide https://sohamsa.org/how-student-loans-work-a-beginners-guide/ Tue, 17 May 2022 06:26:10 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/?p=3363 Student loans function by borrowing money for your study and agreeing to return it, often with interest. It’s easier to comprehend these loans if you know what varieties are available. Both federal and private loans have varied costs and payback terms. You may view payday champion site for addtional information. There you will find everything […]]]>

Student loans function by borrowing money for your study and agreeing to return it, often with interest. It’s easier to comprehend these loans if you know what varieties are available. Both federal and private loans have varied costs and payback terms. You may view payday champion site for addtional information. There you will find everything you need to know about all types of loans which include and student loans.

How student loans work:

The Department of Education offers federal student loans administered by loan servicers.

The Institute for College Access and Success estimates that 84 percent of the Class of 2019’s debt is federal. In general, public loans are preferred above private loans. Why?

  • They don’t verify credit for undergrads.
  • They may be cheaper.
  • They safeguard borrowers in many ways.

Get federal student loans

You must first fill out the FAFSA (FAFSA). This form tells the government about your family’s finances and helps assess your eligibility for financial assistance.

After submitting the FAFSA, the Department of Education calculates your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) (EFC).

You will be subject to federal loan restrictions as an undergraduate. Depending on your school year and financial need, you may borrow between $5,500 and $12,500 each year.

Federal student debts are due. You may be eligible for non-repayable federal grants or work-study, depending on your situation.

Federal student loan types

  • Direct unsubsidized loans are accessible to all students, regardless of financial need. For first-year undergraduates, the annual maximum is $5,000, while for graduate and professional students, it is $20,000.
  • Direct subsidized loans: These are for needy undergraduate students. The government covers the interest on subsidized loans while you’re in school, for six months after you graduate, and while you delay your payments.
  • Direct PLUS loans are for undergraduate, graduate, and professional students’ parents. However, PLUS loans have higher interest rates and fees than subsidized or unsubsidized loans. They also check credit.

Direct consolidation loans consolidate all federal student loans into one.

What is student loan interest? Fees and taxes

Until July 1, 2022, the following interest rates apply to loans disbursed:

  • 37% of undergraduates and 52% of graduate and professional students take out unsubsidized loans.
  • Direct subsidized loans: 3.73 percent
  • Parent, graduate, and professional PLUS loans: 6.28 percent

Congress sets student loan interest rates annually using a formula. The interest rate on federal student loans is set for the loan duration not to vary.

After October 1, 2020, and before October 1, 2022, origination costs are:

  • APR for unsubsidized loans: 1.057 percent
  • 4.228% Direct PLUS loans

These costs are based on your total loan amount. They are deducted from your account when you borrow money.

Check out our guide on understanding student loan interest.

How federal student loans are paid

The typical federal student loan repayment schedule is ten years of installments. A 2019 Student Loan Hero review found that just 30% of students paid off their federal or private loans within ten years.

Other federal repayment plans:

  • Gradual repayment: Begin with smaller monthly payments, which rise every two years for ten years.
  • Payments might be set or graded over up to 25 years.

If you’re having trouble making your loan payments, deferment and forbearance may be options. If you have unsubsidized loans and aren’t deferring, you may wind up with a more significant sum after these programs.

Choose one of the four income-driven repayments (IDR) plans to cut your payments or extend your loan payback term. You can:

Repayment by Income (IBR)

  • Income-Based Repayment (ICR)
  • Pay As You Earn (PAYE) Revised (REPAYE)
  • After 20 or 25 years of payments, forgiveness is usually available, but you’ll likely have to pay income tax on the forgiven sum.
  • It’s worth noting that most student loan servicers provide a 0.25 percentage point interest rate savings for monthly autopay.

Student Loans: private

Banks and internet lenders dominate the private student loan market.

More minor borrowers advantages than federal loans. They also examine credit, and candidates with solid or great credit obtain the best rates. Private student loans need a cosigner for borrowers with limited credit histories.

While you should utilize government loans first, private loans may be advantageous since they have lower borrowing limits and cheaper interest rates depending on your situation. As a last option, personal loans may help pay for education.

Payday loans for students

Private lenders may provide for easy credit inquiry quotations. Your credit score won’t be affected until you’ve filed a comprehensive loan application.

Borrowers must have proper credit or a cosigner. Private loans without a cosigner are possible, but possibilities are limited. You may also be required to be in your junior or senior year of college or to be a graduate student.

Private student loan types

Examine the safeguards provided by lenders:

If so, what are the options?

  • Can you let your cosigner go after a specific amount of payments?

What is student loan interest? APRs, fees

No one can qualify for the lowest interest rates. Therefore most undergraduates will pay a higher rate than if they took government loans.

APRs are generally variable or fixed with private loans. Fixed-rate loans start cheaper than variable-rate loans, but they may arise in the future.

Compare different private lender offers to find the best combination of rates and features. Consider utilizing an online comparison tool to research personal student loans.

How to repay private student loans

Private student loan repayment options generally run from 5-to 15 years.

These loans don’t offer the same repayment options, so you can’t pick an income-driven plan. Unlike government direct subsidized loans, private lenders won’t cover your interest payments for specified periods.

If you need to delay payments, you can usually get an autopay discount and frequently get some forbearance from lenders. Lenders may give 12, 18, or 24 months of patience throughout the loan term.

If your credit and income allow it, or if you have a cosigner, you may be able to refinance your student loans later at a lower interest rate.

BEFORE TAKING OUT

When applying for scholarships or work-study, ask your employer about tuition reimbursement if you plan to work while in school. Student loans should be considered as a last resort when budgeting for education.

Evaluate your student loan borrowing capacity. That entails calculating your monthly payment after graduation and knowing your lender’s choices for decreasing or delaying costs.

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375 students graduate in 2022 from St. Mary’s College of Maryland https://sohamsa.org/375-students-graduate-in-2022-from-st-marys-college-of-maryland/ Sun, 15 May 2022 13:55:30 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/375-students-graduate-in-2022-from-st-marys-college-of-maryland/ ST. MARY’S CITY, Md. — St. Mary’s College of Maryland, the National Public Honors College, graduated 375 students with a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Master of Arts in Education on Saturday, May 14, outdoors on campus’ Townhouse Green . The keynote address was delivered by Terron Hillsman, Director of the Ecological Sciences […]]]>

ST. MARY’S CITY, Md. — St. Mary’s College of Maryland, the National Public Honors College, graduated 375 students with a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Master of Arts in Education on Saturday, May 14, outdoors on campus’ Townhouse Green .

The keynote address was delivered by Terron Hillsman, Director of the Ecological Sciences Division of USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Services (NRCS). His message to the class of 2022 centered on the importance of resilience and the “gift” of hope to others. In his address, he shared with the audience examples of challenges and opportunities he encountered while interviewing several seniors at St. Mary’s College.

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The scholarship will help the youngest of 12 head towards Univ. from iowa https://sohamsa.org/the-scholarship-will-help-the-youngest-of-12-head-towards-univ-from-iowa/ Sat, 14 May 2022 05:12:46 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/the-scholarship-will-help-the-youngest-of-12-head-towards-univ-from-iowa/ SIOUX CITY, Iowa (AP) — The youngest of 12 children and the only American-born sister, Crystal Luna knew she had to make the most of every opportunity presented to her. Not only was Luna’s family dependent on her, but she also wanted to live her own version of the American Dream. On April 28, the […]]]>

SIOUX CITY, Iowa (AP) — The youngest of 12 children and the only American-born sister, Crystal Luna knew she had to make the most of every opportunity presented to her.

Not only was Luna’s family dependent on her, but she also wanted to live her own version of the American Dream.

On April 28, the future 18-year-old North High School graduate received a $40,000 scholarship from the Kind World Foundation. This is the highest cash post-secondary award the local non-profit group gives out each year.

“Receiving this scholarship means so much to me,” Luna explained. “It means all my hard work was worth it.”


Since 2009, the Kind World Foundation, founded by former Gateway executive Norm Waitt Jr., has awarded more than $3 million to hundreds of high school students at eight metropolitan high schools: Sioux City East, North, West, and Bishop Heelan; the town of Southern Sioux; Dakota Valley; Sergeant Bluff-Luton; and Elk Point-Jefferson.

Luna plans to use her scholarship to study Spanish and international business at the University of Iowa, Iowa City. After that, she wants to go to law school, specializing in immigration law.

“Crystal had to mature at a very young age, has been through so much personally, and always wants to help others,” explained Marcia Waitt, chair of Kind World Foundation’s scholarship and education program. “Our program was created specifically for deserving students like Crystal.”

Luna learned a strong work ethic from her mother Yolanda Nava who herself had to leave school after fifth grade.

“My mom worked on the family farm in Mexico before she came to America,” Luna said. “My parents divorced when I was five, and life just got harder.”

Indeed, Luna spent many years living in a two-bedroom, one-bathroom apartment with her 11 siblings.

“Most of us kids slept on the floor,” she recalls. “I felt like a princess the year I got a new Care Bear blanket.”

Yet Luna’s mother worked 16 hour days to ensure her family had a roof over their heads and food on the table.

“When mom went to work, my older sister took care of me,” Luna said. “Plus, I became self-sufficient.”

It was often difficult for Luna, who didn’t feel safe because of her accent.

“Half of my family only spoke Spanish while the other half spoke both Spanish and English,” she said. “It was awkward.”

Soon the pressure got to Luna.

“I was diagnosed with anxiety and depression when I was 12,” she said. “My family didn’t understand mental illness, so I supervised my medication and found transportation to therapy myself.”

In fact, the only place Luna felt comfortable was at school.

“I loved school because I loved learning,” she said.

It was also a place where Luna would receive positive reinforcement for her studies.

“At school, I was the girl who always smiled with her nose stuck in a book,” Luna said.

Yet she knew that very few people understood the struggles of a first-generation student.

“Neither my mom nor my dad spoke English,” Luna said. “They didn’t know anything about college savings accounts or construction credit. When you don’t speak the language, everything seems intimidating and out of reach.

That’s why she became involved with Briar Cliff University’s TRIO Student Support Services, a program funded by the U.S. Department of Education that serves and advocates for first-generation students who were often under -represented in higher education.

“TRIO made me think about the college years before I could go,” she said. “It made me want to plan for the future.”

However, sometimes life can make you lose your mind. It happened last year when Luna’s father died suddenly.

“Losing a parent is horrible,” she said. “Something like that can put you off schoolwork or everyday life. But I wouldn’t let that happen to me.

Instead, Luna focused on her work with North High School’s student council and the National Honors Society, while becoming an Honorary Student 4.0.

“When you’re born to immigrant parents, you often have to work harder to get ahead,” she said. “You want to become a model.”

Luna is still emotional more than a week after being selected for the Kind World Foundation scholarship.

“It was so moving and so encouraging for me,” she said.

Luna’s mother, Yolanda Nava, encouraged her every step of the way.

“My mom was so happy and that made me happy,” Luna said.

Thinking for a moment, Luna remembered feeling bad about her own accent.

“Now I’m so proud of my accent because it signifies my challenges in learning a new language,” she explained. “Everything I’ve been through has made me stronger and made me the person I am today.”

As she looks to the future, Luna has some advice for first-generation students like her.

“Work hard, study hard, get involved in your community and never stop learning,” she said with a smile. “That way you can create your own American dream.”

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Law School Recognizes 2022 Student Elect Awards https://sohamsa.org/law-school-recognizes-2022-student-elect-awards/ Thu, 12 May 2022 05:06:39 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/law-school-recognizes-2022-student-elect-awards/ Photos submitted From left to right: Tyler Mlakar, Maddison Miller, Collin Heard and Professor Alex Nunn. As part of a longstanding tradition, the U of A Law School will present four student-elected awards at the launch ceremony on May 14. Each award honors members of the law school community who have excelled […]]]>



Photos submitted

From left to right: Tyler Mlakar, Maddison Miller, Collin Heard and Professor Alex Nunn.

As part of a longstanding tradition, the U of A Law School will present four student-elected awards at the launch ceremony on May 14. Each award honors members of the law school community who have excelled in a particular area of ​​endeavor. The awards are endowed or funded by benefactors with significant ties to the law school.

Lewis E. Epley Jr. Professor of the Year Award
Professor Alex Nunn received the Lewis E. Epley Jr. Teacher of the Year Award for Excellence in Teaching. It is awarded to a member of the teaching body elected professor of the year by the outgoing class. Nunn has received the graduating classes award since 2020.

“I am extremely honored to be named Teacher of the Year,” Nunn said. “This graduating class is such a special group. More than any other class, their law school experience has been disrupted by the pandemic. But every time I have taught them – whether online or in person – they brought an incredible amount of energy and enthusiasm to the classroom. Simply put, they made teaching fun. I am so humbled and grateful to learn that my classes resonated with them.

Bogle–Sharp Award
Tyler Mlakar received the Bogle-Sharp Award. This award is given to the student elected by their peers as being most likely to succeed in the practice of law.

It was created in memory of Brinkley attorneys, Arkansas Bar Association President William Wilson Sharp, and Arkansas Lieutenant Governor G. Otis Bogle.

“My classmates here at law school are some of the smartest, most talented people in the world I’ve ever had the privilege of meeting,” Mlakar said. “They are tenacious, hardworking and inspiring. We have gone through the rigors of law school during a global pandemic, and yet I would say that we are still one of the most distinguished classes to graduate from this institution. I can say now, without a doubt that all of my classmates will one day become the next great leaders of not just this state, but of this nation. And so, it is for these reasons that I am so deeply honored, and truly humbled, that they chose me as this year’s Bogle Sharp Award recipient. I wouldn’t be where I am today without their inspiration and support. Wooo Pig Forever.

Outstanding Contribution Award
Maddison Miller received the Law School’s Outstanding Contribution to the Community Award. This award is given to the student elected by his peers for his outstanding positive contributions and service to the law school community.

“Receiving this award is both humbling and a tremendous honour,” Miller said. “I think so much of each of my classmates, and they have continually exceeded any expectations I had for what law school scholars would be like. I had no idea what law school would be like. impactful or immense opportunities would present for growth in all areas of my life. My advice to everyone, no matter what environment you find yourself in, is to get involved in any way you can. Meet and talk to everyone you can. Involvement is the best way to make a difference in your community. Pushing yourself to do more will show you exactly how capable you really are, and you’ll rarely regret taking a chance to grow. and improve. Thank you, Arkansas Law, for three unforgettable years.

Deliver student start address
Collin Heard was elected by his peers to deliver the student keynote address.

“Among the many honors and accomplishments of my life, being selected to deliver the commencement address by my peers ranks among the best,” Heard said.

Heard came to law school for a JD after studying criminal justice at the University of North Texas. In law school, Heard served as a mentor for the Dean’s Mentorship Program, was named champion of the Bar Council Negotiation Competition last year, and is the current Vice President of two student organizations – Black Law Student Association and the Sports and Entertainment Law Society. .

Heard has a wide range of professional experience. He has worked for Allied Universal Security Services, the Allen Law Firm in Dallas, the Randall Law Firm in Springdale, the U of A General Counsel’s Office, and the United States Army as a civilian intern . Currently, he works at Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani in Dallas, Texas.

About the School of Law: The law school offers a competitive JD as well as an advanced LL.M. curriculum, which are taught by nationally recognized faculty. The school offers unique opportunities for students to participate in pro bono work, internships, live client clinics, competitions, and food and agriculture initiatives. The school strives to identify, discuss and challenge issues of race, color, ethnicity and the impacts they have on students, faculty and staff members with the aim of create a diverse, inclusive and equitable community. From admitting the six pioneers who were the first African-American students to attend law school in the South without a court order to graduating governors, judges, prosecutors and professors who became President of the United States and Secretary of State, Law The school has a rich history and culture. Follow us on @uarklaw.

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Morristown High senior among winners of Student Harmonium Composer Competition https://sohamsa.org/morristown-high-senior-among-winners-of-student-harmonium-composer-competition/ Tue, 10 May 2022 11:00:44 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/morristown-high-senior-among-winners-of-student-harmonium-composer-competition/ From the Harmonium Choral Society: The Harmonium Choral Society is thrilled to announce the winners of its 25th Annual High School Essay Contest. by Asher Shectman room By day won first prize and will be sung at the Harmonium open hearts concerts Friday, June 3, 2022, 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, June 5, 3 p.m., both […]]]>

From the Harmonium Choral Society:

The Harmonium Choral Society is thrilled to announce the winners of its 25th Annual High School Essay Contest.

by Asher Shectman room By day won first prize and will be sung at the Harmonium open hearts concerts Friday, June 3, 2022, 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, June 5, 3 p.m., both at Our Lady of Sorrows, 217 Prospect St., South Orange.

The entries were so good that there was a three-way tie for second place; the winners are Alexander De Stefano, Katie Nieto and Lux Onigman.

Artistic director dr. Anne Matlack says: “I am in awe of the talent of our student composers and delighted to have supported them for 25 years. The first four pieces were so outstanding that we had to declare a three-way tie for second place this year. I wish time would allow us to perform them all, and I look forward to great things from all of these young composers.

In addition to making its debut with the winner of the competition, the Harmonium Choral Society open hearts concerts will include two other world premieres – love will be reborn by Mark Millerand by Amanda Harberg This! – as well as works by Eric Whitacre, Daniel Pinkham, Moses Hoganand more.

Selected chamber singers will perform Why do you think I fought at Omaha Beach by Melissa Dunphy. Guest musicians include Christine Lamb on the flute and Prince Manvendra Singh Gohil on the harmonica. Tickets are on sale here.

Student composers

Grand Prize Winner Asher Shecman is a senior at Cranford High School. He is a pianist, bassist, guitarist, drummer, arranger and self-taught composer. He plays percussion and leads his school’s bands and marching bands, and also participates in the concert choir, madrigal choir, jazz band, musicals, and a cappella band. Asher won the 2021 competition with his piece Alchemywhich was played in March Resilience concert. He will study composition at Berklee College of Music in the fall.

Alexandre DeStefano (second place) is a senior at Holy Spirit High School in Absecon, NJ and the winner of the 2021 Young Musicians Piano Competition, Collegiate Division and the grand prize winner of the 2021-2022 New Jersey Young Composers Competition for his piece No more, not yet. He won first place for piano performance in the 2021 Ester Weil Ocean City Pops Student Music Competition and the prestigious statewide Algonquin Rising Star Classical Music Competition in 2018 and 2019. Alexander was also a winner from the 2021 State Teen Arts Festival and the Atlantic County Teen Arts. Festival. Alex is a member of Holy Spirit’s Tri-M Music Honor Society and is its conductor. He will attend Rowan University as an Honors College Fellow and major in Music Education next fall.

Katie Nieto (second place) is a performer and composer specializing in musical theater and is currently a senior at Kinnelon High School. Katie has performed in county, regional and statewide ensembles (including the New Jersey All State Mixed Chorus) since she was in 6th grade and has ranked in the top five as a soprano 1 several times. As musical director and arranger, Katie co-founded the Breaking Barriers Theater Company and assisted them in their production of Spring Awakening. As a composer, she wrote the book, lyrics and score for an original musical titled Waiting for Tuesday about LGBTQ+ self-acceptance. She plans to attend Berklee College of Music in the fall.

Lux Onigman (second place) is a senior at Morristown High School. Last year they tied for second place in the Harmonium composition competition with their piece Invictus. They were also recently commissioned to write a new song, A welcome thought, by the Crossing Chorale at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Washington Crossing. A solo vocal piece Lux wrote in 2020 was purchased by the National Youth Rights Association for posting on its website. Lux sings in several choirs, including but not limited to the New Jersey Youth Chorus, Kol Dodi, and the Harmonium Choral Society itself! Lux will be attending Smith College in the fall.
Judges

Our judges worked hard to select the winners, basing their decision on the extent of sound and composition. by Amanda Harberg many commissions include those from the Philadelphia Orchestra Association, the Juilliard School, and the New World Symphony. Awards include three NFA Newly Published Music Awards, two New Jersey State Council on the Arts Fellowships, a Fulbright/Hays Fellowship, and Juilliard’s Peter Mennin Award for Outstanding Achievement. She currently teaches composition at Rutgers University and Interlochen Arts Camp.

Matthew Harris’ choral music is performed and recorded worldwide by large groups as well as school and community choirs. His A Child’s Christmas in Wales for choir and orchestra was commissioned and premiered by the Harmonium Choral Society 20 years ago. He is currently writing a work for the German vocal ensemble Ensemble Nobiles for a premiere at the Gewandhaus in Leipzig.

Judge Sarah Rimkus earned her bachelor’s degree in music composition from the University of Southern California in 2013, where she developed a love of choral music while studying with Morten Lauridsen. She obtained her doctorate at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, studying with Paul Mealor. She has received numerous awards, including the ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award. Harmonium commissioned and created its multilingual In the Beginning was the Word in 2019.

Harmonium hosted Dr. Trevor Weston, professor of music and chair of the music department at Drew University, on the jury last year. Dr. Weston’s many accolades include the George Ladd de Paris Award from the University of California, Berkeley; a Goddard Lieberson Fellowship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; and residencies at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and the MacDowell Colony. In 2021, Weston received the Arts and Letters Award in Music from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Harmonium invites the public to support and encourage young composers by attending concerts. Concerts are accessible and safe for all spectators; accessibility information is available on the website. Support requests or large print programs can be submitted here or by calling 973-538-6969.

Funding was made possible in part by Morris Arts through the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, an agency partner of the National Endowment for the Arts.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE CHORAL SOCIETY HARMONIUM

Harmonium Choral Society, based in Morris County, is one of New Jersey’s premier choral arts organizations. The 100-voice choir has been recognized for its musical excellence and innovative programming, and has commissioned and premiered works by Amanda Harberg, Matthew Harris, Elliot Z. Levine, Sarah Rimkus, and Harmonium Composers-in-Residence Mark Miller and Martin Sedek. , among others.

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WT Graduation honors Paul Engler, 1,573 students graduate from college https://sohamsa.org/wt-graduation-honors-paul-engler-1573-students-graduate-from-college/ Sun, 08 May 2022 18:33:24 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/wt-graduation-honors-paul-engler-1573-students-graduate-from-college/ West Texas A&M University honored businessman and college donor Paul Engler with an honorary degree Saturday in the first of three commencement ceremonies held at First United Bank Center in Canyon, with a total of 1,573 students obtaining university degrees. Engler received an honorary doctorate. in Business Administration and Agriculture from the two colleges that […]]]>

West Texas A&M University honored businessman and college donor Paul Engler with an honorary degree Saturday in the first of three commencement ceremonies held at First United Bank Center in Canyon, with a total of 1,573 students obtaining university degrees.

Engler received an honorary doctorate. in Business Administration and Agriculture from the two colleges that bear his name: the Paul and Virginia Engler College of Business in WT and the Paul Engler College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences.

Upon hearing of this honor, Engler said it was the most beautiful and meaningful he had ever received.

“I have traveled many miles in my 75 years of active participation in the business world. Some of those miles were easy and came fast while some of them were extremely difficult, and those tough miles were definitely the grand masters of my life,” Engler said. “As a result, I would like everyone to know that I appreciate the opportunities that God and the business world have provided me over the years. Thank you again for this incredible honor you have given me.

WTAMU President Walter Wendler commented on the honorary degree awarded to Engler.

“Paul Engler’s life and career have had a huge impact across Texas and the world, including – in a really significant way – here at WT,” Wendler said. “He embodies the true Panhandle values ​​of authenticity, hard work, and commitment to community, and he’s not afraid to take risks and stand out as a leader. He really changed the trajectory of WT, and I’m glad we recognize his impact with this well-deserved honorary degree.

One of the many graduates holding a first-generation degree was Marshal Johnson, who shared the honor with his sister that day. Johnson had an arduous, injury-plagued journey that saw him arrive at WT on a basketball scholarship and come away with ambitions of becoming a doctor. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Biology and is now seeking admission to medical school.

Johnson came to WT on an athletic scholarship after a stellar prep career at Clarendon High School, where he won Golden Spread 2A Player of the Year as a senior. He also earned Amarillo-Globe News first-team super team recognition after averaging 14 points and 7 rebounds in 2017 and led his team to second place in the state championship.

Due to injuries, Johnson only played 63 minutes of basketball during his college career, and he eventually quit the sport after sustaining a kneecap and quadriceps injury to focus on his studies.

“Being a first-generation college student, it’s such an amazing feeling to be able to get on stage, especially when my parents never had that opportunity, which was a big part of my driving force to graduate,” Johnson said. “It was tough, especially when I was trying to play basketball. I can’t put into words how it feels to get to that point.”

Another first-generation graduate, Ashely Dawn Oakes, completed that journey two decades after graduating from Tascosa High School. Oakes is an only child and mother of four, and she lost both parents years earlier. She was the first member of her family to graduate from high school. Oakes reflected on graduating.

“I spent my last years working in school to make this day happen,” Oakes said. “My mum always told me to get an education first, then get a job, then start a family, and obviously I did it all but the way she told me,” said said Oakes, “WT and the McNair Scholarship Program have been absolutely amazing, and I’m so grateful to the friends and family I have who pushed me even when I wanted to quit.”

According to Chip Chandler, WT’s senior communications specialist, the oldest graduate of this Class of 2022 was 65 and the youngest was 19. The graduates of this class came from 41 states and 18 different countries. The graduating class included 137 individuals who maintained a perfect 4.0 GPA and had 45 military veteran graduates. Chandler said 50% of undergraduates are the first in their families to graduate from college.

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Jewish lawyers will honor a pair of judges in their first major event since the pandemic https://sohamsa.org/jewish-lawyers-will-honor-a-pair-of-judges-in-their-first-major-event-since-the-pandemic/ Fri, 06 May 2022 21:45:21 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/jewish-lawyers-will-honor-a-pair-of-judges-in-their-first-major-event-since-the-pandemic/ Judge Bernard Friedman (left) and Judge Michelle Friedman Appel (right). Early Bird tickets through May 12 are $25 for members and $36 for others. The Jewish Bar Association of Michigan (JBAM) welcomes judges, attorneys, legal professionals and law students as it celebrates its first indoor event since the pandemic began. On Monday, May 23 at […]]]>
Judge Bernard Friedman (left) and Judge Michelle Friedman Appel (right).

Early Bird tickets through May 12 are $25 for members and $36 for others.

The Jewish Bar Association of Michigan (JBAM) welcomes judges, attorneys, legal professionals and law students as it celebrates its first indoor event since the pandemic began.

On Monday, May 23 at 6 p.m., JBAM will hold its annual awards banquet at the Westin Southfield Hotel, 1500 Town Center.

At a Zoom event last year, Attorney General Dana Nessel received the Ruth Bader Ginsburg Champion of Justice Award from JBAM, and Justice Avern Cohn received the JBAM Lifetime Achievement Award.

With the unfortunate passing of Justice Cohn on February 4, JBAM named its Lifetime Achievement Award in memory of Justice Cohn, a longtime community leader and stalwart of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan.

Lifetime Achievement

The 2022 Avern Cohn Lifetime Achievement Award recipient will be Judge Bernard Friedman, Senior Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan.

A Detroit native, Judge Friedman graduated from the Detroit College of Law and served in the US Army JAG Corps. He worked in the Wayne County District Attorney’s office, then went into private practice. He sat on the bench of the 48th District Court for Bloomfield Township from 1982 to 1988.

In 1988, he was appointed by President Ronald Reagan to the United States District Court. He was chief judge from 2004 to 2009 and has since been a senior judge.

In a landmark case in 2014, Judge Friedman ruled that Michigan’s ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional. The case was upheld by the United States Supreme Court, establishing constitutional right nationwide.

champion of righteousness

Judge Michelle Friedman Appel, a judge since 2003 at District Court 45B serving Oak Park, Huntington Woods, Pleasant Ridge and Royal Oak Township, will receive JBAM’s 2022 Ruth Bader Ginsburg Champion of Justice Award.

Justice Appel succeeded her father, Justice Benjamin Friedman, who served 34 years on the court. Unfortunately, her father died on February 4, the same day as Justice Cohn.

Justice Appel is a graduate of the University of Michigan and the University of Detroit Law School. For two decades prior to her judgeship, she worked in private practice and served as Oakland County Commissioner from 1999 to 2002.

She is the chief justice of her court and is actively involved in aiding the state court system and training attorneys. She is also president of the Michigan District Judge’s Association. She helped establish veterans treatment courts in the county and a mental health treatment court in her district.

Dedicated volunteer

JBAM’s Volunteer of the Year is its first president, Rachel Loebl Serman. Serman was one of the founders of the organization in 2014.

Rachel Loebl Serman
Rachel Loebl Serman

Serman, a Huntington Woods-based attorney, has worked tirelessly over the years as an officer, board member, and committee member in all aspects of JBAM’s efforts to provide social, educational, and charitable activities. to members and the community.

Student scholarship

Each year, the JBAM awards a $1,500 scholarship to a law student who embodies the character and values ​​of the late attorney Charles J. Cohen. Cohen stressed the importance of legal education. JBAM chose to honor Cohen’s life and legacy by naming his scholarship after him.

The recipient of this year’s scholarship from the Charles J. Cohen Esq. The scholarship recipient is Louis Magidson, a sophomore at Mercy Law School, University of Detroit. A graduate of Michigan State University, he is the son of Detroit attorneys Rochelle Lento and Mark Magidson.

Louis Magidson
Louis Magidson

Louis Magidson majored in international relations and economics at Michigan State University. During his undergraduate studies, he studied in Brussels, Belgium, learning how the European Union works. Since then, he has explored many areas of law while working in several law firms.

Early Bird tickets through May 12 are $25 for members and $36 for others. Tickets purchased from May 13 cost $36 for members and $45 for others. To register, visit https://jlive.app/events/2190.

For more information about the Jewish Bar Association of Michigan, visit jewishbar.org or email Ellie Mosko at ellie@moskolawpc.com.

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Local school district honors students who sign to protect and serve https://sohamsa.org/local-school-district-honors-students-who-sign-to-protect-and-serve/ Thu, 05 May 2022 01:28:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/local-school-district-honors-students-who-sign-to-protect-and-serve/ CULLMAN, Ala. (WBRC) – Student-athlete dedication days are filled with celebrations, smiles and proud loved ones. The Cullman County School District now hopes to give those who sign to serve our country a similar honor. Six different students inside the district pledged to protect our country and our freedoms on Wednesday, May 4, 2022. This […]]]>

CULLMAN, Ala. (WBRC) – Student-athlete dedication days are filled with celebrations, smiles and proud loved ones. The Cullman County School District now hopes to give those who sign to serve our country a similar honor.

Six different students inside the district pledged to protect our country and our freedoms on Wednesday, May 4, 2022.

This is the second annual military day for the Cullman County School District, and the district thinks it’s a great way to honor students. The six students enlisted in three different branches, and the superintendent points out that this further highlights their character.

“We want to honor our young people who enlist and join the military. We want to recognize and celebrate them,” said Cullman County School District Superintendent Dr. Shane Barnette. “In Cullman County we have a lot of phenomenal students and this is just a testament to that.”

A student who signed up said the chaos in Ukraine had not deterred him at all and that he wanted to serve and make a difference.

“When I was younger thinking about the military, there were adults fighting in Afghanistan just so I could sleep there. I want to repay them and do my country a favor,” said Holly Pond High School senior and Army National Guard signer Calvin Odom.

Perhaps the oldest living Navy veteran, 101-year-old Roy Drinkard, attended the signing ceremony to wish the signers well. He says he will pray for them and that their country is grateful for their sacrifice.

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Celebrate #CougarChoice22 Awards in Style https://sohamsa.org/celebrate-cougarchoice22-awards-in-style/ Tue, 03 May 2022 01:10:41 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/celebrate-cougarchoice22-awards-in-style/ History links HOUSTON– University of Houston student-athletes, coaches and staff gathered to celebrate the department’s historic year while honoring a host of personalities at the annual Cougar Choice Awards, held Monday evening from the Fertitta Center. Cougar Choice Awards winners include: Champion for life – Awarded to an exceptionally well-rounded student-athlete based […]]]>

HOUSTON– University of Houston student-athletes, coaches and staff gathered to celebrate the department’s historic year while honoring a host of personalities at the annual Cougar Choice Awards, held Monday evening from the Fertitta Center.

Cougar Choice Awards winners include:


Champion for life – Awarded to an exceptionally well-rounded student-athlete based on the following criteria: academics, athletics, civic/community service, and career development

WINNER – Katie Power has served as SAAC President for the past two years, as well as Vice President for one year. She has served on the American Athletic Conference SAAC Board of Directors for the past two years.


Power earned her Bachelor of Science degree in biology and will be attending medical school in the fall. Power helped the Cougars win their sixth consecutive American Athletic Conference title in February, marking his fifth title with Houston.

 


DJ Hayden Award

DJ Hayden Award – Student-athlete who has overcome significant obstacles in lift, has a positive attitude and pursues excellence despite obstacles

WINNER – Becca Schulte is one of the best stories in sports. The seventh-year senior has been a college student-athlete since 2015, attended three different schools, performed on the biggest stages, overcame injuries and more. Schulte is working on her second master’s degree and competing at the Division I level in softball, while raising a one-year-old. The Cougars second baseman leads the team in the field in average, slugging, home runs, doubles, RBIs and walks.

 


Female Cougar of the Year

Female Cougar of the Year – Awarded to the top female student-athlete in Houston

WINNER – Chase Farris won his third straight American Athletic Conference championship and qualified for his second straight appearance at the NCAA championships.


At the US Championships, Farris won first place in the 3 meter diving event and placed third in the 1 meter and platform diving events.

 


Male Cougar of the Year

Male Cougar of the Year – Awarded to the top male student-athlete in Houston

WINNER – At the end of a career full of victories, graduate men’s basketball forward Fabian White Jr. was named Cougar of the Year.


In 2021-22, White averaged 12.5 points and 5.7 rebounds per game with a team-high 1.5 blocked shots per game to lead the Cougars to the NCAA Elite Eight for the second consecutive season.


Starting all 38 games to set a school record in one season, White was honored as the All-American Championship’s Most Outstanding Player and was selected by league head coaches to the All-American Athletic Conference First Team. .

 


Female Academic Cougar of the Year

Female Academic Cougar of the Year – A leader in the class

WINNER – Majoring in industrial engineering, Elizabeth Richardson was named the 2022 Academic Female Cougar of the Year at the Cougar Choice Awards. Richardson won his third straight American Athletic Conference title with the Cougars in February.

 


Male Academic Cougar of the Year

Male Academic Cougar of the Year – A leader in the class

WINNER – Houston Football’s Kyle Ramsey excelled academically at the University of Houston while earning his degree in electrical engineering. Ramsey, who has a GPA of 3.882, spent time working on a special project at the University of Houston’s Swarm Robotics Lab, where he helped build a robot that tracked and filmed runners in races. long distance, like a 5k or a marathon. He is a member of the Omicron Delta Kappa honor society and was invited to join Tau Beta Pi (engineering honor society) for being in the top 1/8 of his class.

 


Female Rookie of the Year

Female Rookie of the Year – First-year student-athlete who made significant contributions

WINNER – Henrietta Fangli was named Female Rookie of the Year after an impressive first season with the Cougars. At the American Athletic Conference Championships, Fangli won an individual title in the 100-yard breaststroke, as well as a first-place finish in the 200-yard medley relay.

 


Male Rookie of the Year

Male Rookie of the Year – First-year student-athlete who made significant contributions

WINNER – A true freshman in the 2020-21 track and field season, Shaun Maswanganyi is a four-time All-American in track and field. The sprinter was the NCAA national finalist in the 100 meters in 2021 and the third winner in the 200 meters. He also anchored the men’s 4×100 meters relay team at an 8and-final place in the NCAA last year.

 


Head Coach of the Year

Head Coach of the Year – Based on record, historical significance, respect for student-athletes, and impact in the community

WINNER – Men’s Basketball Head Coach Kelvin Samson added another award to his 2021-22 season trophy with his selection as Coach of the Year.


Sampson led the Cougars to the NCAA Elite Eight for the second straight season and won the American Athletic Conference regular season and tournament titles for only the fourth time in school history.


The Cougars recorded their second 30-win season under his leadership and the program’s seventh consecutive 20-win season, extending the school record.


For his and his team’s impressive performances, Sampson was also named National Coach of the Year by CBS Sports and received the Ben Jobe Award, given annually to the top minority coach in the country.


Sampson was also named Coach of the Year by the American Athletic Conference, NABC District 24 and was honored as Texas Coach of the Year by Dave Campbell. Texas Basketball Magazine.

 


Game of the Year

Game of the Year – Based on crowd, opponent, intensity and historical significance

WINNER – Men’s basketball’s 72-60 win over No. 2/2 Arizona in the NCAA Tournament Southern Region Semifinals was selected as the Game of the Year.


Behind a game-high 21 points and six rebounds from second-year point guard Jamal Shead and 19 points and five 3-pointers from senior guard Kyler Edwards, the Cougars knocked out the No. 1 seed in the South Region and advanced to the NCAA Elite Eight for the second consecutive season.


The Cougars took a 2-0 lead 34 seconds into the game off the bucket by graduate forward Fabian White Jr. and were never tied or trailed against the Wildcats.

 


Game of the Year

Game of the Year – Best game in 2021-22

WINNER – Houston Football’s Marcus Jones used a 100-yard kickoff return touchdown in the final minute of the game to lead the Cougars to a 44-37 win over No. 19/16 SMU on Oct. 30, 2021, at inside the TDECU stadium. The 100-yard kickoff return touchdown was only the second kickoff return touchdown in the final 30 seconds of an FBS game in the last 15 years.

With the victory, Houston moved to 5-0 in conference for the sixth time in program history and the first since 2015. The Cougars have won 11 straight en route to an American Athletic Conference championship appearance and a Birmingham Bowl win over Auburn. .

 


Spirit Award

Spirit Award – Someone who is proud to be a Cougar, who supports other teams, who has a passion for the city, the school and the program

WINNER – The 2021-22 reunion king, Jordan Booker has been an outstanding part of the athletics program. An NCAA All-American Booker goes out of his way to support his fellow Cougars in any way he can. A member of the SAAC, the sprinter embodies what it means to be a true Cougar fan.

 


Staff member of the year

Staff Member of the Year – A person who has had a significant impact on student-athletes

WINNER – Financial Aid Coordinator Karma Meck, who recently retired, joined the University of Houston’s athletics department in November 2013. In her role, she coordinates college and athletic scholarship programs for nearly 400 Houston student-athletes. Additionally, she works with Houston Athletics compliance officers to ensure student financial aid complies with NCAA regulations and regularly advises students and parents on scholarship opportunities, application processes and the rules.

 


Ken Baxter of the Year Award

Ken Baxter Award – Person whose volunteering had a positive impact on Houston Athletics in 2021-22

WINNER – Ashley Whitworth Beecher holds a bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Houston. She has spent the better part of a decade leading youth-focused philanthropic efforts. Ashley served as co-chair of the University of Houston Athletics Hall of Houston’s 75th Anniversary Celebration Gala in September. This event raised over $550,000 for student-athlete scholarships.

The Beechers’ support and love for UH runs in the family. Ashley’s husband, Clark, serves on the UH Board of Visitors. Ashley, Clark and their four children attend all UH football games in their suite at TDECU Stadium. They are members of the Corbin J. Robertson Society, which provides full tuition and fees for one academic year to a student-athlete.

Besides her involvement at UH, Ashley serves on several other boards and has been featured in the Houston Chronicle, National Public Radio, PaperCity Magazine, and the Seaside Times for her philanthropic efforts. She is the managing partner and owner of the Dawson Group, which owns 5 restaurants and dessert concepts in Seaside, Florida.

 


team of the year

Team of the Year – Based on GPA, community service and global record

WINNER – Men’s basketball was recognized as the team of the year after posting a 32-6 record, sweeping the regular season and American Athletic Conference tournament titles and advancing to the NCAA Elite Eight for the second consecutive season despite the unexpected loss of guards Marcus Sasser and Tramon Mark to season-ending surgeries in December 2021.


The Cougars were ranked in both national polls for the fifth consecutive season, setting a school record, and ranked No. 7 in the latest Ferris Mowers Coaches Poll, the second straight year in which Houston finished among the Top 10.

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