Honor student – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 10:12:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sohamsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Honor student – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ 32 32 The Chellgren Center invites nominations for Chellgren endowed faculty appointments https://sohamsa.org/the-chellgren-center-invites-nominations-for-chellgren-endowed-faculty-appointments/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 08:00:01 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/the-chellgren-center-invites-nominations-for-chellgren-endowed-faculty-appointments/ LEXINGTON, Kentucky (September 21, 2022) — The University of Kentucky Chellgren Undergraduate Center of Excellence Endowment will fund five new professorships commencing at the start of the 2023 spring or fall semesters. Each faculty position will be filled for a three-year, non-renewable term. The Chellgren Endowed Professorships are reserved for tenured professors in the UK […]]]>

LEXINGTON, Kentucky (September 21, 2022) — The University of Kentucky Chellgren Undergraduate Center of Excellence Endowment will fund five new professorships commencing at the start of the 2023 spring or fall semesters. Each faculty position will be filled for a three-year, non-renewable term. The Chellgren Endowed Professorships are reserved for tenured professors in the UK who have outstanding credentials as teachers and researchers with a deep interest in undergraduate excellence.

The mission of the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence is to advance the UK’s commitment to three main areas: student excellence, teaching excellence and program excellence. The goal is for the university to be nationally recognized as a beacon of undergraduate excellence. The mission of the Chellgren Center contributes to this goal by raising the aspirations of UK students; to help students realize their highest academic potential; inspire progressive reform and innovation in teaching, learning and curriculum development; and fostering creative and productive collaborations among the many programs and departments engaged in undergraduate mission.

To be named a Chellgren Endowed Professor, a faculty member must (1) take on a leadership assignment for a campus-wide undergraduate excellence program or initiative, or (2) propose an independent project that comprehensively addresses at least one of the following areas of focus that can improve undergraduate education, as evidenced, in part, by improved retention and graduation rates:

  • Development of new courses which may include those that incorporate cultural competency, collaborative learning, problem solving, creative thinking and teamwork to enhance student skills and help prepare them for a workplace constantly evolving.
  • Identify and/or develop new undergraduate programs (including certificates, dual degrees, multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary offerings) that will broaden student preparation and prepare students to become leaders and scholars in a diverse global society.
  • Revision of existing courses.
  • Curricular reform which may include the integration of curricular and extracurricular activities designed to promote student engagement, diversity, and retention.
  • Creation of educational innovations.
  • Design and implementation of new assessment procedures that may include the assessment of academic achievement, student well-being and belonging.
  • Identify, embed, and propose strategies to embed high-impact practices into curricula and majors.
  • Created new programs that strengthen collaboration between college programs and Academic Success Office units.

Each Chellgren endowed teacher assumes responsibility for the following:

  • conduct an educational project or accept a leadership assignment for a program or initiative affiliated with the Chellgren Center;
  • serve as an active member of the Chellgren Center faculty team by participating in regular discussions regarding excellence in education in the UK;
  • participate in the review committees for external scholarships; and
  • deliver a public lecture that either outlines the research project being pursued during the chair’s tenure or addresses a topic relevant to enhancing the UK undergraduate experience.

Eligibility: Any tenured faculty member in the UK can apply with a history of deep and sustained commitment to undergraduate teaching.

Application: A completed application should be submitted electronically to the Chellgren Endowed Faculty Selection Committee via email at chellgrencenter@uky.edu no later than November 1, 2022. The request must include the following:

  • a letter of interest;
  • a brief curriculum vitae or up-to-date curriculum vitae (maximum three pages);
  • a project proposal that clearly addresses one or more priority points identified above (maximum three pages), or a description of a leadership assignment appropriate to the mission of the Chellgren Center (maximum two pages);
  • most recent teaching portfolio (which may be updated at the candidate’s discretion); and
  • a letter of support from the candidate’s dean.

Selection of gifted teachers: In consultation with the Senior Associate Provost for Administration and Academic Affairs, the Provost nominates Chellgren Endowed Professors from a list of finalists forwarded by the Chellgren Endowed Professor Search Committee.

Compensation: Each Chellgren Endowed Professor Fellowship carries a stipend of $5,000 per year for the duration of the appointment, which can be used in any proportion for salary or research support. The preferred strategy is to fund Chairs as overload assignments, but alternative strategies can be proposed in consultation with Deans. With overload assignments, additional compensation/research support is possible.

Announcement: New Chellgren staffed faculty will be announced no later than December 10, 2022.

If you have any questions about the application process, please direct them to Isabel C. Escobar (Chellgren Endowed Chair): Isabel.Escobar@uky.edu.

The Chellgren Center will host an open house on Tuesday, September 27 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the second floor of the Funkhouser building (rooms 224, 211, and 219/221). Stop by to welcome our newest class of scholars, meet President Escobar, and learn more about the Chellgren Center, Office of Nationally Competitive Awards, and Campus Partner — the Office of University Research.

The Chellgren Student Fellows program is supported by the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence within the Office of the Provost. To learn more about the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence, please visit www.uky.edu/chellgren/.

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Reagan Kunkle balances field hockey, the tape. https://sohamsa.org/reagan-kunkle-balances-field-hockey-the-tape/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 02:02:38 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/reagan-kunkle-balances-field-hockey-the-tape/ Video: Get ready for the YAIAA 2022 Fall Sports Season! The high school fall sports season is officially back this week! Dan Rainville, York Daily Record Finding a time to talk with Reagan Kunkle about his daily schedule isn’t easy. The West York eldest earned enough credits to be in school from 7:30 a.m. to […]]]>

to play

Finding a time to talk with Reagan Kunkle about his daily schedule isn’t easy.

The West York eldest earned enough credits to be in school from 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. only. But then she works at the Joe Street Cafe for three hours. Then two hours of field hockey practice. Then a short break for dinner before two hours of group practice.

She’s usually free for a bit once she gets home after 9 p.m.

It’s just a typical Wednesday.

“There are days when I wish I had time off and could just relax,” Kunkle said. “This is what my normality has always looked like. This is what makes me feel comfortable.

“It can be overwhelming. But in the long run, I know all this craziness will make me a better person.”

Kunkle is far from the only local teenager with a busy schedule. But she is not only busy, she excels in all areas. She verbally committed to accepting a field hockey scholarship to Division I Ball State in Muncie, Indiana. And the longtime trumpeter was chosen as the drum major in the marching band this fall.

She also plays field hockey year-round, lacrosse in the spring, and takes AP-level classes. She played basketball or swam in the winter.

Balancing these things hasn’t been easy. Not only did this test his time management skills, but it put pressure on him in multiple ways. Her group and athletic schedules inevitably clash on occasion, and she must prove she’s committed to both while sometimes prioritizing one event over another.

Double priority: Students at this York County school excel on the field and on stage

He played field hockey for the Royal Navy:Now this dad is developing the game at Central Pa.

She also felt judged as a musician for not living up to the typical image associated with star athletes.

As she enters her senior year of high school, Kunkle and her family believe that the benefits of her busy schedule have outweighed the hardships.

“Don’t get me wrong, she’s a typical teenager, and there were days when it was 6 a.m. in December that year, she swam, and that’s not a fun thing to do,” said said her mother, Mindy. “When you put everything she does into perspective, time management is a huge part of it.

“It’s being disciplined to do the things you have to do and not taking the easy way out all the time.”

She’s natural in some things…but not others.

Kunkle hesitated when asked the question, but was ultimately honest.

Yes, she was good at the trumpet from the start.

“My teachers told me I was natural,” she said shyly. “I definitely have to work on it more now than when I was younger, just to be able to keep improving and playing the tougher bits.

“But yes, I was a natural.”

Kunkle does not come from a family of musicians. She first tried flute, but switched to trumpet in fourth grade because she wanted something “that could be heard.”

His motivation with sport was different. The daughter of longtime local basketball coach Jim Kunkle, Reagan dabbled in football, hoop and lacrosse at a young age. Outside of her size shortcomings on the basketball court, she has always been a good athlete.

Field hockey offered a different challenge.

She didn’t know much about the sport until her dad was head coach of girls’ basketball at New Oxford from 2015 to 2017. The Colonials’ top player was Kaelyn Long, who was also the top player YAIAA field hockey. Long is now an assistant field hockey coach at Harvard after a stellar career at Bucknell.

“He was the person I admired the most,” said Kunkle, who was in middle school at the time. “I play field hockey because of her. My first field hockey stick was one of hers. I remember going to her house one night and she was teaching me the basics.

“And I really hated it.”

For once, Kunkle wasn’t good at something. After her first organized practice in seventh grade, she cried and told her father that she wanted to quit.

It was not an option in his house.

“If you commit, it’s up to you to keep it,” Mindy said. “If she said she wanted to try that, then go for it, but you’re not going to tell me in a few weeks that you’re done. You’re holding on because the team depends on you.”

After a little more time practicing — and watching some of Long’s games at Bucknell — Reagan realized she loved field hockey. Besides, she was pretty good at it.

A midfielder who played in almost every position at one point, Kunkle went from playing for a local club team to one based in Palmyra – a home for Pennsylvania field hockey.

She was recruited by Division I programs including Penn State, Liberty, James Madison and Bucknell, but also looked at smaller schools like East Stroudsburg, Shippensburg and York College. She ultimately chose Ball State because of the atmosphere around campus and her interest in the school’s sports media program. She wants to study sports marketing after considering nursing.

It turned out that her combination of extracurricular activities had helped her more than she thought.

“I asked the coach at Ball State why they were watching her. Because there’s a stigma where every parent thinks their kid is a D1 athlete,” his dad, Jim, said. “The coach said right away – her work ethic. ‘Look at everything she does, from training to performing in the band to being an honor student.’ She told me that they didn’t have to worry about these children because they already knew how to manage their time.

“When she was younger, other people would say to us, ‘Why are you putting her in so many things? Just let her be a kid.’ But we didn’t force her, we allowed her to do what she wanted.

find a balance

Mindy remembers helping Reagan zip up her band uniform moments before her daughter had to sprint onto the football field to join in for a pre-game performance.

She had finished a field hockey game in Bermudian Springs less than an hour before.

Balancing multiple activities required constant communication with his coaches and group directors. It helps that West York doesn’t have any field hockey games this season scheduled for Fridays ― when the marching band performs at football games. Music practices take place on Wednesdays and Fridays (a performance repeat) and field hockey has just two of its 17 games scheduled on Wednesdays.

“We’ve always looked at things as a competition or a performance that replaces a practice,” said West York band manager Rod Meckley. “We encourage students to plan ahead, and Reagan has always been good at communicating. If there is a conflict, I contact the coach. We take the student out of the middle because he is the one who decides to do a lot and it’s not always easy to juggle.”

“For me, the group comes first because it’s a school class, and Reagan is the leader of that class,” added West York field hockey coach Allie Rauhauser. “But it went pretty well with the schedules. The other day she came to the pitch a little late from work and apologized. I was like, ‘girl, you’re good. ‘ She was always coachable and there for the team.”

Kunkle said there were about 10 marching band members who also played fall sports, including two other field hockey players. But she’s not just in the band. She was chosen as the drum major after auditioning for it last spring.

The band leader, drum major is “a good musician who can lead by example, lead formations and put out fires before they happen”, according to Meckley.

Kunkle said one of his biggest responsibilities is making sure “everyone is having fun and feeling comfortable and accepted.”

She admitted that it was not always easy for her. She used to worry that people would laugh at her for being “a kid in the band”.

After talking with her family and other kids who were balancing music and sports, she learned to overcome that.

“You learn to be proud of yourself,” she said. “Before, I never told anyone that I was in a marching band and if people talked about it, I would push it away. I always felt like I was falling in the middle of different crowds. As I got older, I realized that was a great success.

“I’m really proud to be in the marching band and who I am.”

Kunkle tries to be a role model for other kids who worry about living by a certain image. Those who know her think she is well placed for this. Meckley said she was “quiet and introspective at first, but charming and someone who lights up the room when loaded”. Rauhauser called her “a role model for more than athletes.”

Kunkle said she recently received a piece of advice that she thinks all students should hear.

“You shouldn’t feel comfortable 100% of the time,” she said. “You need to get out of your comfort zone and stretch your abilities because in the long run it will make you a better person. If you feel conflicted, just try something. If it works, great, if not, it doesn’t. is not serious.

“You’re going to feel uncomfortable but that’s fine.”

Matt Allibone is a sports reporter for GameTimePA. He can be reached at 717-881-8221, mallibone@ydr.com or on Twitter at @bad2theallibone.

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Greenwich High grad speaks on his Tufts debut https://sohamsa.org/greenwich-high-grad-speaks-on-his-tufts-debut/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 08:08:21 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/greenwich-high-grad-speaks-on-his-tufts-debut/ Jameson graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering. The award is given to a senior graduate who demonstrates both marked ability as a speaker and a strong sense of public responsibility. As the winner, she was the only senior graduate invited to speak at the debut exercises at Tufts. Jameson was also one […]]]>

Jameson graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering. The award is given to a senior graduate who demonstrates both marked ability as a speaker and a strong sense of public responsibility.

As the winner, she was the only senior graduate invited to speak at the debut exercises at Tufts.

Jameson was also one of 124 students inducted into the Honos Civicus Society, which recognizes Tufts seniors who have excelled academically and as civic leaders. She was the only undergraduate engineering student to be inducted this year.

Additionally, she was named to the Dean’s List for the spring semester.

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Berlin’s new youth football team shaves its head in honor of a friend with leukemia https://sohamsa.org/berlins-new-youth-football-team-shaves-its-head-in-honor-of-a-friend-with-leukemia/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 01:13:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/berlins-new-youth-football-team-shaves-its-head-in-honor-of-a-friend-with-leukemia/ NEW BERLIN, Wis. (CBS 58) — It’s not common for the New Berlin West Youth Vikings to shave the night before the season opener, but they had a pretty special reason for Friday night. “This is for Norah. She has leukemia. No child should go through this,” Jayce Cook said. Norah, a classmate and friend […]]]>

NEW BERLIN, Wis. (CBS 58) — It’s not common for the New Berlin West Youth Vikings to shave the night before the season opener, but they had a pretty special reason for Friday night.

“This is for Norah. She has leukemia. No child should go through this,” Jayce Cook said.

Norah, a classmate and friend on the Grade 8 football team, spent her summer undergoing chemotherapy treatments after being diagnosed with acute leukemia in June.

“She’s amazing. A great student. A great friend,” said Nikki Jansen, her mother. “She’s nice. She’s fierce. She can play with boys. So that’s great.”

A few players wanted to show Norah that she wasn’t alone in her fight, and the rest of the team quickly bought into the idea.

“She didn’t really have a choice whether she wanted to or not, and this is our way of giving back to her. It’s our decision to help her in some way,” Spencer Phelps said.

Coaches and parents helped the boys with touch-ups, but ultimately the boys performed the move on their own.

“It shows maturity,” head coach Garrett Wensing said.

The boys will run through a “Fight like Norah” banner, take off their helmets and surprise her with their freshly shaved heads.

“I think she’s going to love it,” Phelps said. “She loves us all. We all love her.”

Saturday’s game is dedicated to Norah.

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EDITO: UBE and students must make efforts to preserve their autonomy – Le Cavalier Daily https://sohamsa.org/edito-ube-and-students-must-make-efforts-to-preserve-their-autonomy-le-cavalier-daily/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 18:07:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/edito-ube-and-students-must-make-efforts-to-preserve-their-autonomy-le-cavalier-daily/ Autonomy is a principle of which we are proud, but it is an empty ideal without effort on the part of the institutions that govern us and the students they represent. The University Board of Elections has had a tough few semesters within its organization, and voters turn out remains weak. Autonomy, which requires elections […]]]>

Autonomy is a principle of which we are proud, but it is an empty ideal without effort on the part of the institutions that govern us and the students they represent. The University Board of Elections has had a tough few semesters within its organization, and voters turn out remains weak. Autonomy, which requires elections organized by the UBE, must be taken seriously – by both the UBE and the student body. This year’s elections are crucial. The honor committee organizes a constitutional convention to rewrite its constitution after the biggest change in its history. The student council provides essential resources for student success. The University Judiciary Committee must continue to hold members of the community to high standards of citizenship. Ahead of this year’s election cycle, we call on the UBE to invest in member retention, voter education and social media outreach to improve voter turnout.

UBE has faced organizational challenges in its mission, both internal and external. This year, the group president resigned due to an increased academic workload. It follows a disturbing pattern – the president of last year also resigned position at the start of the academic year. With leadership constantly taking charge and abdicating authority, it is impossible to pull yourself together and get organized. The lack of stable leadership within UBE threatens its effectiveness, but is also downright confusing to an already bewildered student body.

That being said, the student body has little to no idea what UBE is or does. To significantly increase the low turnout, UBE needs to become a more active part of our community. It should invest in educating students not only about election details, but also candidate platforms. By voting, students are making a difference – as we can see from the recent revision of the unique sanction system of the honor committee. However, this cannot happen without proper education. This can be achieved through a myriad of strategies – class visits, social events and social media promotion are just the start. No one engages in what they don’t understand, and if students had adequate knowledge of the election process, we are optimistic, they would likely be more willing to vote.

The lack of engagement is very evident – ​​the highest turnout among students last year was in the aforementioned honor referendum. Even still, this turn out was only 6,010 students, or 23.8% of the student body – not even a quarter of the student body. We suspect that this strong involvement was most likely the result of frequent outside visits explanations and endorsements for or against the proposed referendum, rather than any effort by the UBE itself. To increase participation, the UBE should invest in what has the potential to be its most powerful asset: social media. While the UBE has always tried to increase voter turnout with election gifts, they should opt for more educational methods so that students vote responsibly. Although it has an outreach and marketing section, UBE does not make the effort to reach out to the student body. Given the weakness of the group Next, an even more engaging solution would be to partner with other organizations to reach more students. Taking this advertising route would send a message that more accurately reflects UBE’s mission and the best interests of students – students should vote because elections determine the direction of autonomy on the grounds, not just because they are offers free bagels.

We recognize that the UBE alone cannot improve voter turnout. A significant part of the effort must come from the students themselves. Following the passage of last year’s honor referendum, students should feel empowered that their voice can truly justify change. If UBE is indeed doing more to increase voter turnout, students must be receptive. Freshmen should be targeted when it comes to voter turnout efforts – they will be more likely to engage in the novelty of self-government on the ground. All students, however, have a responsibility to engage with the University’s student policy. So, students, read the UBE, research the candidates and their concerns, and recognize your ability to change policy. The University is not too big and you are not too small to make a difference.

The Cavalier Daily Editorial Board is made up of the Editor-in-Chief, the Managing Editor, the two Opinion Editors, the two Senior Associates and an Opinion Columnist. The board can be reached at eb@cavalierdaily.com.

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US Secretary of Education Surprises RPS Elementary School with Honor | Govt. and politics https://sohamsa.org/us-secretary-of-education-surprises-rps-elementary-school-with-honor-govt-and-politics/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 20:39:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/us-secretary-of-education-surprises-rps-elementary-school-with-honor-govt-and-politics/ US Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona visits Oak Grove-Bellemeade Elementary School as part of his back-to-school bus tour. A special visitor met with students and staff at Oak Grove-Bellemeade Elementary School Tuesday afternoon: U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona parked in Richmond’s South End for a few hours in the part of […]]]>

US Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona visits Oak Grove-Bellemeade Elementary School as part of his back-to-school bus tour.



A special visitor met with students and staff at Oak Grove-Bellemeade Elementary School Tuesday afternoon: U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona parked in Richmond’s South End for a few hours in the part of his “Road to Success Back to School Bus Tour”.

Cardona made a big announcement for students by declaring Richmond Public Schools Oak Grove-Bellemeade Elementary School the first Special Olympics Unified Champion School in Central Virginia.

The Special Olympics Unified Champion Schools” is a program for schools from kindergarten through college that intentionally promotes meaningful social inclusion by bringing together students with and without developmental disabilities to create accepting school environments, using three interconnected components: Special Olympics Unified Sports®, inclusive of youth leadership and whole-school engagement,” according to the Special Olympics website.

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Cardona said in an interview, “This school got it because throughout its practices in every classroom, in the culture of the school, every student is valued and seen as an asset.

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“Students are engaged in learning with their peers, and as a result, you have a stronger school community and students who understand how to work with people who learn differently.”

Cardona shared with students that when he was growing up, he sometimes felt uncomfortable in school. He felt different from his peers because he comes from a Puerto Rican home. He said the food he ate at home was different, he spoke Spanish before English and listened to Spanish music – things his classmates didn’t.

“I knew I was a little different and, at first, I felt a little bad about it,” Cardona said. “But over time, I learned something: the things that made me different made me special.”

Oak Grove-Bellemeade is a majority minority school. According to September 2021 enrollment data, it had a population of 71.8% black students, 23.6% Hispanic students, 2% white students, 2% mixed-race students, and 0 .5% Asian students.

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Superintendent Jason Kamras led the students in a chant of the division’s motto, “Teach, Lead, and Serve with Love.”

“What that means is that everyone, all of you, are included, welcome and feel at home at school,” Kamras said. “No matter where your family is from, no matter what language you speak at home, no matter what your abilities, everyone is welcome at RPS.”

After he got off the bus Tuesday afternoon, Oak Grove-Bellemeade Elementary students lined up ready to give Cardona, Kamras and other special guests high-fives as they headed to the school cafeteria, where kindergarten students and kindergartners engaged in a variety of activities.

The students played cornhole, walked along a balance beam and “lifted weights” with Cardona. At the weight station, made up of two plastic bottles filled with confetti and held together by a wooden pole, Cardona lifted weights with some of the school’s youngest learners.

ART 180’s summer residency program brings together RPS high school students

Cardona then went inside the Bellemeade Community Center, where he was greeted by the remaining students of Oak Grove-Bellemeade Elementary. The students applauded “Man in the Mirror” by Michael Jackson, “Happy” by Pharrell Williams and “Love on Top” by Beyonce.

After announcing Oak Grove-Bellemeade Elementary as the Unified Champion School, student ambassadors and special guests participated in a game of cornhole in the community center.

Special Olympics Virginia President David Thomason expressed during Tuesday’s surprise announcement how proud he is of the elementary students.

“Of all the schools in the Central Virginia region, you are the first school to be recognized for your degree of inclusion by Special Olympics North America,” said Thomason.

RPS’ new directors explain how they ‘lead with love’

“There are a lot of teachers at school, but you are all teachers for us,” he added. “You show us how to live our life. You show us that inclusion is not just an event; [rather]it is a way of living our life.

Cardona kicked off his week-long multi-state bus tour of Tennessee and North Carolina with First Lady Jill Biden on Monday.

The tour aims to show how school communities have been helping students recover and thrive since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. From Virginia, it will stop in West Virginia, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

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J-Club Hall of Honor Class of 2022: Jon Habben ’79 https://sohamsa.org/j-club-hall-of-honor-class-of-2022-jon-habben-79/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 16:57:51 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/j-club-hall-of-honor-class-of-2022-jon-habben-79/ History links The J-Club | Hall of honor of the J-Club By Frank Rajkowski, SJU Writer/Video Producer COLLEGEVILLE, Minn. – Pat Haws ’72 was hired as the first full-time swimming and diving coach at Saint John’s University in 1973. But it wasn’t until two years later that he landed what he considered […]]]>

The J-Club | Hall of honor of the J-Club

By Frank Rajkowski, SJU Writer/Video Producer

COLLEGEVILLE, Minn. – Pat Haws ’72 was hired as the first full-time swimming and diving coach at Saint John’s University in 1973.

But it wasn’t until two years later that he landed what he considered his first top-notch recruit. His name was Jon Habben ’79, and he had twice qualified for the state middle distance competition at Willmar High School.

“I had talked to other people, but he was the first guy I really chased,” recalled Haws, who remained the Johnnies’ head swimming and diving coach until 1998. “I put in a lot of work, and I remember being so excited when he told me he was coming here.”

History has proven that the excitement was warranted as Habben – who transitioned to sprints at the college level – won eight MIAC titles and qualified for national competition four times (twice at the NAIA level and twice in NCAA Division III).

His freshman 50-yard freestyle win at the 1976 MIAC meet made him the first SJU swimmer to hit the wall as a conference champion, and his 10th-place finish in the same event at the Division III national meet. in 1978 made him the first All-American in program history.

Others also won the same honors in those two encounters, but Habben’s exploits came first.

“I never made it to the podium in the state meet in high school, so that kind of success was all new to me,” said Habben, who was also a member of Willmar’s football team and played in the Class A state championship game as a junior in the fall of 1973.

“Suddenly I was a freshman in college and one of the top seeds in my events against successful State/Division III competitive swimmers. The experience of our entire team on the pool deck at the MIAC Championships versus just two or -three of us at the state swim meet was so different to me. The cheers coming from SJU’s pool area at each event were unbelievable and – when combined with Pat’s late-season shrinkage, shaving and confidence – it made it pretty easy to perform well and be successful at the MIAC Championships.”

Habben – who was inducted into the Willmar High School Hall of Fame in 2010 – said the faith Haws had in him also made a big difference.

“I used to have a routine that I did before practice where I did 200 sit-ups,” said Habben, who went on to a long career with Gold’n Plump after graduation. “I was busy doing this on the side one day when Pat walked into the pool with a group of potential recruits. He pointed at me and said, ‘This guy is going to be our first national champion.’

“I didn’t quite make it, but it meant a lot to know that he believed in me like that.

“Then there was the support of my parents, family members, high school coaches, roommates and fellow swimmers,” he continued. “My parents had three kids who swam, and rumor has it they’ve only missed a grand total of one meet over the years. All of those people have believed in me over the years.”

Its success has made such faith easy to grant. As a rookie, Habben finished first in the MIAC meet in the 50, 100, and 400 freestyle relays while adding a second-place finish in the 200. He repeated as the conference champion in all three events as a sophomore and finished 15th to 50th at the NAIA national meet.

As a junior, he won the 50 and 400 freestyle relays in the conference meet, then followed that up with a 10th-place finish in the 50, 11th-place finish in the 100 and 12th-place finish in the Division III national championship relay. to encounter.

“Right off the bat he was so good,” Haws said. “He had such intensity. I remember when he was waiting to swim his leg from a relay, he was up there grinding the soles of his feet into the starting blocks – just getting ready to go.

“I was sitting at the bottom of the pool when he won his first MIAC championship,” he continued. “He finished in the shallow end. At the time, they timed me with a schedule. But somehow I got there fast enough to greet him when he came out. It was a moment quite memorable.”

One of many Habben supplied during his four years at Collegeville.

“Those were memorable times,” said Habben, who shared a room with legendary SJU basketball player Frank Wachlarowicz ’79 for a time during their senior year in 1978-79. “Warner Palestra had just opened and I went from swimming in a small murky five lane pool in high school to this brand new large eight lane pool – featuring a 1 and 3 meter diving board and a 5 meter tower. t was easy to imagine the Warner Palestra as my new ‘home’ for the next four years.

“SJU has had a lot of very, very good swimmers and divers, including the originals who led the way, and I feel extremely lucky to be a part of that history. I loved every minute of my time in Saint John’s. “

Hall of Honor Class of 2022

The Class of 2022 of student-athletes, coaches and volunteers will be inducted into the Saint John’s University J-Club Hall of Honor at a ceremony scheduled for Homecoming Saturday – October 1 – at Guild Hall (Old Gym).

The dinner and induction ceremony begin at 5:15 p.m. Registration is $75 per person until September 25 ($100 per person after) and includes dinner and drinks. All proceeds go to the J-Club to support SJU athletics.

To register click here.

-2022 J-Club Hall of Honor Class: Minga Batsukh ’11
-2022 J-Club Hall of Honor Class: Cyril Paul ’59
-2022 J-Club Hall of Honor Class: Tim Schmitz ’78
-2022 J-Club Hall of Honor Class: Br. Mark Kelly, BSF
-2022 J-Club Hall of Honor Class: Troy Bigalke ’01
-SJU to induct 11 into the J-Club Hall of Honor on October 1

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Sheridan teen earns Eagle Scout honor | News, Sports, Jobs https://sohamsa.org/sheridan-teen-earns-eagle-scout-honor-news-sports-jobs/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 06:30:52 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/sheridan-teen-earns-eagle-scout-honor-news-sports-jobs/ Sam Bower With a party of over 100 present at his court of honor, Samuel Bowers was awarded the rank of Eagle Scout in Scouts BSA on August 14. Samuel is a member of Boy Scout Troop 267 in Fredonia, and is the son of Ron and Marianne Bowers of Sheridan. […]]]>

Sam Bower

With a party of over 100 present at his court of honor, Samuel Bowers was awarded the rank of Eagle Scout in Scouts BSA on August 14. Samuel is a member of Boy Scout Troop 267 in Fredonia, and is the son of Ron and Marianne Bowers of Sheridan.

He passed his review board on June 27, his official Eagle Scout date. He achieved this goal at just 13 years old, significantly younger than the average Eagle Scout.

The Eagle Rank award is a performance-based achievement whose standards have been well maintained by the Boy Scouts of America over the years. Only about 4% of all Scouts achieve this rank.

The ceremony was held at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church Hall in Silver Creek. Scoutmaster Jim Stenger presented the award, while Troop 267 Committee Chair Dr. Cynthia Smith acted as master of ceremonies. Senior Patrol Leader Cooper Stenger, Assistant Scout Leader Brian Noody and other Scouts attended throughout the ceremony. Eagle Scout Joseph Bowers, brother of Samuel, delivered the Eagle Charge.

Samuel was honored with the presence of many special guests and was honored with speeches by Assemblyman Andy Goodell, Chautauqua County American Legion Scouting Chairman Jay McManus, Silver Creek Mayor Jeffrey Hornburg, Fredonia Mayor Doug Essek and Project Eagle beneficiaries of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Rev. Daniel Fiebelkorn and Rev. Mark Wolski. In fact, Mayor Hornburg has officially declared August 14 Samuel Ronald Bowers Day in the Village of Silver Creek.

Eagle Scout Bowers himself recognized his uncle Frank Pagano with the Mentor pin; as well as his mother with a miniature Eagle Pin and his father with the lapel pin.

Of the many requirements needed to achieve Eagle Scout rank, one of the most notable is the Eagle Scout draft. The Scout must develop, finance and manage a service project for the benefit of the community. The Samuel’s Eagle project consisted of a complete renovation of the funeral chapel in Notre-Dame-du-Mont-Carmel cemetery.

The project was a major undertaking, inspired by a very personal experience after the death of his grandfather. The project lasted about a year and was first put into operation after the death of her grandmother. Samuel was able to realize this meaningful project thanks to very generous donations from parishioners, community members and businesses. He was assisted in the design and installation by his uncle Frank Pagano, his uncle Mike Pagano, his uncle Louis Pagano, his father and other family members, scouts and friends. The renovation included new walls, flooring, landscaping, seating, interior decorating, building repairs, and the addition of heat and power. The project was graciously and enthusiastically supported by the parishioners of the church.

Bowers is also a member of the Order of the Arrow, Scouting’s national honor society, as well as a national graduate of youth leadership training. Bowers was elected and served as his troop’s senior patrol leader, and was recently awarded the Chautauqua County American Legion Scout of the Year in June 2022. He participates in monthly camping trips to various locations including Camp Merz, Camp Gross, Elk Lick, Pa.; Woodstock, Ontario; Angelica, NY, Ovid, NY; and attends summer camps at Camp Merz as well as Camp Pioneer in the Adirondacks.

Eagle Scout Bowers is an honor student who attends Silver Creek Central School. He is a member of the National Junior Honor Society and recently received the State Comptroller’s Office Achievement Award, as well as the New York State Attorney General’s Office Triple C Award for Courage, L commitment and character.



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Men’s tennis advances three to quarter-finals at ITA Fall Tour https://sohamsa.org/mens-tennis-advances-three-to-quarter-finals-at-ita-fall-tour/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 01:42:38 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/mens-tennis-advances-three-to-quarter-finals-at-ita-fall-tour/ Victoria Guerra September 9, 2022 WICHITA, Kansas – The Arkansas men’s tennis team completed its first day of the ITA Fall Tour with all six Razorbacks advancing to the Round of 16 and three advancing to the quarterfinals tomorrow. Returning junior Melvin Manuel won both of his games today as the No. 1 seed in […]]]>


WICHITA, Kansas – The Arkansas men’s tennis team completed its first day of the ITA Fall Tour with all six Razorbacks advancing to the Round of 16 and three advancing to the quarterfinals tomorrow.

Returning junior Melvin Manuel won both of his games today as the No. 1 seed in the tournament. In the round of 16, Manuel beat Robinson of Oklahoma in straight sets 6-2, 6-0. He continued to dominate, beating Zach Greuber in straight sets, 6-2, 6-1 in the round of 16.

Manuel will face new addition to the Arkansas roster, Alan Sau in the quarterfinals. In his Razorback debut, Sau was ranked No. 5 and beat both opponents in straight sets on his way to the quarters. Benedkit Emesz also made his first Razorback appearance as the No. 2 ranked player. Emesz will face Wichita State’s Alex Richards tomorrow in the quarterfinals after winning both of his matches today in straight sets.

The Razorbacks picked up nine total wins on the day, with each Razorback winning their Round of 16. Junior Adrien Burdet won the first set tiebreaker 7-6 (11-9) and won the second set, 6-1 for his victory. Jake Sweeney split sets in his opener, winning the third set tiebreaker 1-0 (10-6). Junior Foster Rogers completed the Razorbacks’ first-round victories with a straight-sets, 6-2, 6-2 victory.

Arkansas continues to play on the ITA Fall Tour tomorrow with quarterfinal matches beginning in the morning. For all tournament information, visit the tournament website to find links to draws and results.

For the latest on all things Arkansas men’s tennis, follow the Hogs on social media by liking us on Facebook (Arkansas Razorback Men’s Tennis) and following us on Twitter and Instagram (@RazorbackMTEN).

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Former OPRF student returns as dean https://sohamsa.org/former-oprf-student-returns-as-dean/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 17:55:29 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/former-oprf-student-returns-as-dean/ With 47 new recruits this school year, Oak Park and River Forest High School is making steady progress toward diversifying its workforce. Employees of color make up about 62% of new hires this year. 30% of new hires are black, 23% are Latino and 9% are Asian or Pacific Islander. Thirty-eight percent of new recruits […]]]>

With 47 new recruits this school year, Oak Park and River Forest High School is making steady progress toward diversifying its workforce. Employees of color make up about 62% of new hires this year. 30% of new hires are black, 23% are Latino and 9% are Asian or Pacific Islander. Thirty-eight percent of new recruits are white.

Of the 20 new teachers hired this year, 10 are white, four are Latino, three are black and three are Asian or Pacific Islander. Currently, 27% of OPRF faculty members are people of color, up from 25% last year. Twelve percent of OPRF teachers are black while nearly 73% of OPRF teachers are white.

OPRF has more employees of color in other job categories. People of color make up 44% of administrative and management employees and 82% of campus security officers.

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