Intellectual – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 06:07:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://sohamsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Intellectual – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ 32 32 Mortality among people with mental health problems has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic https://sohamsa.org/mortality-among-people-with-mental-health-problems-has-increased-during-the-covid-19-pandemic/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 04:08:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/mortality-among-people-with-mental-health-problems-has-increased-during-the-covid-19-pandemic/ The highest number of deaths among people with mental health and developmental disabilities has been magnified during the COVID-19 pandemic, a study based on more than 160,000 patients has found. Before the pandemic, death rates among people with serious mental health problems were already higher than in the general population. New research published in The […]]]>

The highest number of deaths among people with mental health and developmental disabilities has been magnified during the COVID-19 pandemic, a study based on more than 160,000 patients has found.

Before the pandemic, death rates among people with serious mental health problems were already higher than in the general population. New research published in The Lancet Regional Health – Europe shows that between March and June 2020, during the first wave of COVID-19, mortality increased further among people with mental disorders and intellectual disabilities compared to the general population.

The study was published in the run-up to World Mental Health Day on October 10, 2021, which this year is themed “Mental Health in an Unequal World”.

COVID-19 deaths among people with learning disabilities were nine times higher than in the general population during the first period of lockdown, study finds, and for those with eating disorders almost five times higher. For people with personality disorders and those with dementia, deaths from COVID-19 were about four times higher than in the general population and more than three times higher among people with schizophrenia.

The research was partially funded by the Maudsley Biomedical Research Center (BRC) of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and used the Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) system to analyze anonymized data from clinical electronic records of patients in southern London.

The results of our study paint a startling picture of how the existing vulnerability of people with mental health and developmental disabilities worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. Higher death rates compared to the general population were associated with more deaths from the COVID-19 infection itself, as well as deaths from other causes. “

Dr Jayati Das-Munshi, lead study author and reader in social and psychiatric epidemiology, King’s College London

Das-Munshi is also Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist with South London and the Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

“People living with severe mental health problems and intellectual disabilities should be considered a vulnerable group at risk of death from COVID-19, as well as death from other causes, throughout the pandemic. We suggest the need to prioritize vaccination and optimize physical health care and suicide risk reduction, before, during and after peaks of COVID-19 infection in people living with mental health problems. “

Using NIHR Maudsley BRC’s Clinical Records Interactive System (CRIS), researchers analyzed anonymized data from 167,122 patients in South London and the Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust on deaths between 2019 and 2020. They assessed death rates in nine mental health problems and intellectual disabilities and by ethnicity. These were standardized by age and sex and were also compared to the five-year average weekly deaths (2015 to 2019) in England and Wales. These were then standardized against London demographics, in order to assess whether the estimates were captured by the effects at the local area level.

Lead author Rob Stewart, Professor of Psychiatric Epidemiology and Clinical Informatics at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King’s College London, said: “These findings and their implications illustrate the importance of be able to learn from the information contained in health records. We have been working with Maudsley’s CRIS platform for almost 15 years now and a key goal has been to highlight inequalities in mortality and general health. Since CRIS information is updated on a weekly basis, this has allowed us to track the progress of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on mental health services. “

Deaths among people with mental disorders and intellectual disabilities fell from July 2020 to September 2020, as COVID-19 cases declined and lockdowns eased, but remained double those of the general population , which was similar to the figures before the pandemic.

Similar mortality trends were seen among the minority ethnic groups in the sample, with people from South Asia and the black Caribbean with severe mental health and developmental disabilities being 2.5 times more likely to die during the pandemic period compared to the year preceding the pandemic. High mortality risks were also evident for white Britons and black Africans with severe mental health and developmental disabilities.

Source:

Journal reference:

Das-Munshi, J., et al. (2021) All-cause and specific-cause mortality in people with mental disorders and intellectual disabilities, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: cohort study. The Lancet. doi.org/10.1016/j.lanepe.2021.100228.


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Spencer van Vloten: With an intellectual disability, we all have a role to play in inclusion https://sohamsa.org/spencer-van-vloten-with-an-intellectual-disability-we-all-have-a-role-to-play-in-inclusion/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 21:42:54 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/spencer-van-vloten-with-an-intellectual-disability-we-all-have-a-role-to-play-in-inclusion/ By Spencer van Vloten The next time you are in the community, take a minute and analyze your surroundings. You can wait at a bus stop, chat outside with the neighbors, or relax between classes at a favorite campus café. Now write down who you see, then write down who you not see. It is […]]]>

By Spencer van Vloten

The next time you are in the community, take a minute and analyze your surroundings.

You can wait at a bus stop, chat outside with the neighbors, or relax between classes at a favorite campus café.

Now write down who you see, then write down who you not see. It is likely that you will not see one of the thousands of British Columbians with an intellectual disability.

British Columbians with developmental delays or disorders such as Down syndrome were once considered “incurables,” confined to institutions like the infamous Woodlands so that they were out of sight of the public, existing separately from the public. the society.

Although, fortunately, this degree of exclusion no longer persists, community inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities is still not where it should be.

And at the root of this are our attitudes.

One of our most problematic tendencies as humans may be that we too often focus on what sets us apart rather than what we have in common. For decades, people with intellectual disabilities have been viewed as the other and societal practices have reinforced this attitude.

In schools, students with complex needs have been separated into cohorts where they have little or no contact with most of their peers of the same age. In terms of employment, sheltered workshops saw people with disabilities isolated from the rest of the workforce and paid less than their non-disabled counterparts.

Practices like this have helped entrench societal attitudes that people with disabilities exist separately from those who do not: they are not people we make friends with; these are not the people we work with; and they are not like us. They are just different.

But whatever differences there are, they are vastly outnumbered by what we share.

People with intellectual disabilities aim to live independently, seek friendships and love, and find work they enjoy, to the great benefit of employers and colleagues, I might add, who have Proven to morale and productivity when employees with disabilities are part of integrated work environments.

People with intellectual disabilities are also insightful, funny, and kind, sharing the same interests in things like hockey, Netflix, music, and art as non-disabled people.

And they’re incredibly capable, especially when their communities need it most.

Take, for example, the Self-Advocate Leadership Network. Formed by two friends with intellectual disabilities, they organized a province-wide advocacy network and delivered major action during the pandemic, connecting community members with crucial information and social support .

It is also in part through their advocacy that British Columbia’s policy on essential visitors has changed, allowing families to be with loved ones in nursing homes and hospitals.

Why am I bringing this up now? Because October is Community Inclusion Month.

Officially declared as such by the province, it’s a time to celebrate the participation of people with developmental disabilities in our communities and to reflect on our own perspectives on inclusion. This is also the time to analyze the improvements to be made.

This includes all levels of government providing increased funding and political support for inclusive, accessible and affordable housing developments; this includes creating more opportunities for people with disabilities to practice the profession of their choice, as well as the training required to make this possible.

And, most importantly, it includes a change in attitude that recognizes that people with intellectual disabilities are not “others” to be pushed aside, but human beings with goals, feelings, and families like you and me. Without this change in attitude, none of the other changes will be possible, and we will not be a truly inclusive society.

So the next time you look around and don’t see someone with an intellectual disability, ask yourself why and if there is anything you can do to promote inclusion, whether it’s hiring someone with a disability, doing work. volunteering with a disabled people’s organization, or just smiling and saying hello if someone with an intellectual disability crosses your path.

Only when these become the status quo, our way of doing things without having to think about them, will inclusion of British Columbians with developmental disabilities be where it belongs.

Let’s embrace our similarities, celebrate our differences, and aim for a British Columbia where everyone can fully participate during Community Inclusion Month and beyond.

Following


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Accession of the Republic of Seychelles to the Harare Protocol – Intellectual property https://sohamsa.org/accession-of-the-republic-of-seychelles-to-the-harare-protocol-intellectual-property/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 13:43:14 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/accession-of-the-republic-of-seychelles-to-the-harare-protocol-intellectual-property/ South Africa: Accession of the Republic of Seychelles to the Harare Protocol 08 October 2021 Adams & Adams To print this article, simply register or connect to Mondaq.com. The Republic of Seychelles has acceded to the Harare Protocol on Patents and Industrial Designs, becoming the 21st member state of ARIPO. The President of Seychelles, HE […]]]>

South Africa: Accession of the Republic of Seychelles to the Harare Protocol

To print this article, simply register or connect to Mondaq.com.

The Republic of Seychelles has acceded to the Harare Protocol on Patents and Industrial Designs, becoming the 21st member state of ARIPO.

The President of Seychelles, HE Wavel Ramkalawan, signed the Instrument of Accession to the Harare Protocol on August 26, 2021 which the Director General of ARIPO received on October 1, 2021.

Seychelles becomes the 19th Contracting State to the Harare Protocol. In accordance with the Protocol, from 1 January 2022, users of the ARIPO system can nominate Seychelles in their applications.

The other ARIPO Member States which are Contracting Parties to the Harare Protocol are: Botswana, Kingdom of Eswatini, Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Kingdom of Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Originally posted by ARIPO on Oct 5, 2021.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

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New Circuit Court Rules for Intellectual Property Claims https://sohamsa.org/new-circuit-court-rules-for-intellectual-property-claims/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 11:25:52 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/new-circuit-court-rules-for-intellectual-property-claims/ The rules of the circuit court have been changed to facilitate access to this court for certain intellectual property claims. A new 5D ordinance has been inserted into the rules of the Circuit Court.1 It establishes procedures to deal with certain intellectual property claims brought before this court. An “intellectual property claim” is defined in […]]]>

The rules of the circuit court have been changed to facilitate access to this court for certain intellectual property claims.

A new 5D ordinance has been inserted into the rules of the Circuit Court.1 It establishes procedures to deal with certain intellectual property claims brought before this court. An “intellectual property claim” is defined in Section 2 of the Copyright and Related Rights Act 2000 and includes certain procedures specified under the 2000 Act as well as the Patents Act of 2000. 1992, the Trademarks Act of 1996 and the Industrial Design Act of 2001.

These new judicial rules follow the 2019 law on copyright and other provisions relating to intellectual property. See our related briefing here. It has made various changes to the legislation in this area to allow the extension of the jurisdiction of the Circuit Court and the District Court to allow right holders to bring claims for infringement of intellectual property of lesser importance. value in the monetary jurisdiction of these courts. The objective was to improve the possibilities of execution of these requests, in particular those which would not be economical to pursue in the High Court.

The new rules specify that an intellectual property claim must be made by issuing and serving an ordinary civil deed which must contain certain additional information, specific to intellectual property proceedings. In summary, the entries must indicate:

  • the registration number of any relevant registered intellectual property right;
  • full details of the ownership of any relevant unregistered intellectual property right, or the claimant’s right to claim infringement;
  • details of the nature and extent of any intellectual property right claimed by the applicant (including the capacity in which the applicant is suing if it is not the registered owner or holder of the relevant intellectual property right) ;
  • details of the alleged infringement;
  • the material facts invoked in support of the request;
  • the specific relief sought against each defendant, each provision or rule of law invoked in support of that relief and the grounds for the relief;
  • the facts to demonstrate the jurisdiction of the court to hear the case.

The new rules also deal with a variety of applications, such as a civil claim for surrender, for example, of counterfeit goods under the Industrial Design Act of 2001 or counterfeit goods under the Industrial Design Act. 1996 marks. There are also provisions dealing with requests for erasure and so on. of a sign incriminated under this law of 1996 or for the confiscation or disposal of counterfeit goods or articles under various intellectual property laws.

The new rules come into effect on October 12, 2021.


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Protecting Your Intellectual Property: Part II | Butler Snow LLP https://sohamsa.org/protecting-your-intellectual-property-part-ii-butler-snow-llp/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 19:27:04 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/protecting-your-intellectual-property-part-ii-butler-snow-llp/ In our previous article, we discussed the importance of upstream intellectual property (IP) protection and seeking legal advice to help us develop a strategy to better navigate the complex intellectual property landscape. . We looked at the different types of intellectual property, key considerations for protection, filing processes, and the strategy behind building a plan […]]]>

In our previous article, we discussed the importance of upstream intellectual property (IP) protection and seeking legal advice to help us develop a strategy to better navigate the complex intellectual property landscape. . We looked at the different types of intellectual property, key considerations for protection, filing processes, and the strategy behind building a plan with legal counsel. In this article, we’ll cover the ways you’ll need to enforce your trademark or patent after registration, the nuances involved in maintenance and renewal filings, and the role of legal counsel in that process. We will discuss the main post-registration procedures as well as the importance of trademark or patent enforcement.

Now that you’ve protected your IP address, how do you go about post-registration?

Once you have obtained registration, it is in some cases necessary to monitor your trademark to maintain the scope of protection afforded by the registration and to prevent the illegal use of your intellectual property by a third party. This does not mean taking legal action against all possible offenses. However, for example, if a third party’s mark is close enough that there may be consumer confusion, it is important to assess whether the challenge of the third party mark is necessary to maintain the scope of the protection of your brand as soon as possible. There are a number of ways to dispute a claim, and even at this initial stage, legal advice is essential to streamline pre-litigation procedures and offer appropriate advice as you work to maintain protection.

There are two main ways to challenge the domestic use of a trademark: through the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) or through the federal court. Once a trademark application has been reviewed and authorized by a trademark examining attorney, the application can be challenged with the TTAB. Authorized applications are published in the Official Trademark Journal for thirty days to inform third parties of the application. From the date of publication, third parties have a period of thirty days to oppose or extend the period to oppose the request.

In the section below, we will discuss the process of identifying potential third-party breach threats.

Third party infringement of trademark and patent rights

At this point in the application of your intellectual property post-registration, you will need to identify potential threats from third parties of infringement of your particular intellectual property rights. For example, you want to ensure that third parties do not infringe or dilute your mark by using a mark too similar to your own in connection with related goods and services or by practicing the process or composition claimed in your patent.

To keep up with new common law uses of a trademark and federal trademark applications, there are research companies that monitor and report these new occurrences. Your legal advisor can work with the research provider to help you make an informed decision about whether or not to challenge the new mark in question. These research companies perform similar authorization and surveillance searches for patents. Proactive monitoring of third-party uses of trademarks and related patents puts you in a better position to enforce and maintain your intellectual property rights.

Maintenance and renewal deposits: Patents, trademarks and other IP

Another important consideration in the post-registration process is navigation through maintenance and renewal repositories. There are different requirements and deadlines for filing procedures. Without proper planning, you could run into unnecessary costs or even lose the rights to a specific IP registration. Whether you are dealing with patents or trademarks, it is essential to proactively track maintenance and renewal requests as part of your ongoing strategic plan.

With this in mind, it is rare for a company to have only one trademark or patent registration. Instead, most companies have an intellectual property portfolio that includes multiple brands or a family of patents. This is why having a proactive maintenance plan is a key factor in the successful enforcement of intellectual property rights. In addition, the legal advisor will play a key role in advising on the extension of protection within an intellectual property portfolio. For example, they might recommend extending the scope of a trademark registration when the trademark is used in association with additional goods and services or filing a patent application based on the commercial use of the technology and identify the additional deposits needed to facilitate these extensions.

When it comes to maintenance and patent and trademark filing practices, there are some commonalities but most are unique and dealt with on a case-by-case basis. One thing in common is that patents and trademark registrations require a maintenance renewal fee to keep the registration alive after a specified period of time. Tracking and maintaining records can be difficult for businesses if they have many records, especially if they are navigating this process without legal assistance. Legal teams will track and keep all relevant due dates in order while advising on things like what type of renewal request to submit. They will also provide advice on the scope of renewals and the associated costs prior to any deadline in order to preserve your intellectual property rights.

The role of legal counsel in post-registration procedures

Costs and potential outcomes are things you need to discuss with a lawyer to understand the investment and the potential risks and rewards associated with maintaining and enforcing your intellectual property rights. In this area, it is a case-by-case analysis when it comes to identifying third party infringement and taking action in certain cases. This is where your legal strategist will work with you to develop a post-registration plan for protection and enforcement, including potential next steps in the event of a breach. Whether you are dealing with trademark, patent or copyright matters, legal counsel will help you navigate the nuances of this process while providing you with resources and knowledge for future use. They will also provide structure and guidance at every step of the complex IP protection and enforcement processes.

In addition to the uniqueness of each infringement case, a lawyer can help you find the most beneficial and fastest resolution options to reduce costs, risk, or any kind of loss of your intellectual property rights.


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Questions and Answers with Karen Artz Ash – Intellectual Property https://sohamsa.org/questions-and-answers-with-karen-artz-ash-intellectual-property/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 07:39:01 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/questions-and-answers-with-karen-artz-ash-intellectual-property/ To print this article, simply register or connect to Mondaq.com. [Fabric and Foundation of Practice] Tell us about your practice and your day-to-day legal work My main goal is to ensure that I am a knowledgeable and common sense resource to my clients on all matters affecting their brands and the businesses based on those […]]]>

To print this article, simply register or connect to Mondaq.com.

[Fabric and Foundation of
Practice]

Tell us about your practice and your day-to-day legal work

My main goal is to ensure that I am a knowledgeable and common sense resource to my clients on all matters affecting their brands and the businesses based on those brands. I represent a range of global fashion and beauty brands. I help these companies to do everything possible to protect and enforce their names and other property rights, prepare and disseminate promotional and support material that respects the integrity of the rights of third parties and, among other things, develop and negotiate comprehensive agreements covering manufacturing, licensing, advertising, distribution, sponsorship, co-branding, collaborations, campaigns and just about any form of arrangement that exploits a company’s intellectual property.

After more than 30 years of practice, what are the most spectacular changes that you have observed?

Certainly the biggest change has been how quickly things are moving. Everything now requires immediate action, a comment, a response to the minute. We have, in general, become an “on demand” society. This makes it harder for businesses to make sure they’re always doing the right thing, and it makes it more expensive for them to do business in general. The creative process is fast and furious. Products and styles should be developed, purchased and marketed within a very short timeframe. From a legal standpoint, this requires the ability to develop appropriate documentation, often with little time. This ultimately requires that lawyers and in-house staff are prepared with appropriate models and resources, and that their underlying intellectual property (eg, brand portfolios) is in good repair.

On a somewhat different note, one of the really good things that I have seen over time is how companies are socially conscious, rallying together to support worthy causes such as protecting civil liberties, supporting social justice, promoting diversity, protecting LGBTQ rights, and recognizing the need for suitable clothing for the physically disabled. Social media has played an important role in creating a forum for businesses to promote and support the common good.

Advertising has also changed a lot. Advertising in conventional magazines is only a small part of how fashion brands promote themselves and their products. They use influencers, develop social media campaigns and showcase their products and trends on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Things change almost every hour.

[Evolution of Fashion
Law]

You have helped shape the operation of a fashion law firm. Can you talk about the evolution of the practice area?

I know we all talk about “fashion law” as a discipline in its own right. In fact, I teach a law course at New York Law School on licensing in the fashion industry, and have contributed to several books under the title “Fashion Law”. But, the reality is that the term really only reflects knowledge of a single (and incredibly diverse) industry, and then the application of individual disciplines to that knowledge. For example, I am first and foremost a lawyer in Intellectual Property. But, by understanding and learning how fashion companies and the industry work at large, I apply my skills to the breadth of issues these companies might face. It also means that my practice has broadened to accommodate other areas of knowledge, such as bankruptcy, banking, antitrust laws and being able to recognize all of these issues. So “fashion law” is really just a knowledge base devoted to a particular industry. It is now a recognized discipline only because the industry has grown so much, has become so sophisticated, and forms such a large part of the global economy.

[Today in Fashion &
Law]

Given the whirlwind of activity, pre and mid-pandemic, what is your overall assessment of the state of fashion and the law?

The past 18 months have been both so stimulating and so educational. I have seen businesses come to a screeching halt and implode, seemingly overnight; magnificent closed shops; and so many people no longer needed to dress up. We were (and perhaps still are) overwhelmed by just getting through the day, staying healthy, and protecting our families. Everything else seemed almost silly.

But the reality is that the fashion industry supports city and suburban life, is a necessary part of our real estate industry, and offers enormous employment opportunities. The inability of the fashion industry to thrive has a domino effect. Just walking around New York City over the past year and seeing the large number of abandoned storefronts has underscored the clear interrelationship between the fashion industry, the economy, and our daily lives. .

The industry has had to adapt, as we have all had to change. In the end, I think it will be a good thing. There is a real appreciation of individual needs, as well as a burst of creativity. A door has opened on new, less traditional approaches. We see it with different kinds of designers coming into the picture, embracing creative elements and prioritizing the important things in life. People are adopting a new individuality when it comes to the way they dress. I have no doubts that we are all doing better.

[Lifestyle]

What has changed for you during the pandemic in the way you work, play and serve others?

I have been working remotely for 18 months. I start each day by taking a dance class with my husband (we do Latin dance in a ballroom studio). We then have a coffee together, then start our working day in separate rooms. The physicality and joy of dancing makes me feel ready to face the day. (Recently my adult daughters and their husbands have also started dancing.) The movement is subtle but strong and precise – sometimes requiring adjustments here and there to accommodate the things around you. This is how I face each day with the same skills.

The pandemic has brought to light the difficulties so many others face, when they lack opportunities or support, do not have equal access to resources, medical care or employment. While I have always been dedicated to volunteer work (and chair the NY Pro Bono committee in Katten), my role as chairman of the Volunteers of Legal Service (VOLS) organization has been particularly rewarding this. year. We have done so much to support those disproportionately affected by circumstances beyond their control; and advocacy for the common good and for society as a whole really put everything into perspective.

Read The Katten Kattwalk | Number 23, please click here.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

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Mary Cariola Center, URMC to study how COVID-19 affects people with disabilities https://sohamsa.org/mary-cariola-center-urmc-to-study-how-covid-19-affects-people-with-disabilities/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 20:06:36 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/mary-cariola-center-urmc-to-study-how-covid-19-affects-people-with-disabilities/ Two local agencies will work together to help scientists better understand how COVID-19 affects people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Mary Cariola Center in Rochester is participating in a national study conducted by the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at UR Medicine. “This study means the world to us, to our families, to our […]]]>

Two local agencies will work together to help scientists better understand how COVID-19 affects people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The Mary Cariola Center in Rochester is participating in a national study conducted by the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at UR Medicine.

“This study means the world to us, to our families, to our staff, to our students. Some might say it’s a godsend, ”said Karen Zandi, President / CEO of Mary Cariola.

Zandi said she also viewed this opportunity as a way to keep her school safe.

“This will help us understand how to best test the population, how COVID is spread in schools, and is imperative for keeping people with DID safe,” Zandi said.

The $ 4 million project, funded by the National Institutes of Health, will allow the University of Rochester Medical Center to collect test and antibody samples from some of Mary Cariola’s students and staff during the two years to help provide critical information on how the virus is spreading among the vulnerable population. The data collected during this study will be merged with information collected from other sites across the country.

“Ultimately, this study will have major implications for schools across the United States and in particular for schools that serve vulnerable students,” said Dr. John Foxe, director of the Delmonte Institute.

According to the NIH, an unvaccinated person with an intellectual and developmental disability is four times more likely to contract COVID-19 and eight times more likely to die from the disease than a person without DID.

Foxe said this research will help institutions like Mary Cariola make the best decisions for her students and staff and communicate effectively.

“A big part of our project here is trying to better understand how to get our message across to community members (DLIs) in a clearer, more compelling, and cohesive way, so that they can make the choices they want. need. do, ”Foxe said.

Sarah Tedesco’s son Harry is one of the students participating in the study. She said her decision to enroll Harry, who has autism and an intellectual disability, was driven by the lack of COVID-19 information available to parents seeking answers for children with disabilities.

“Involving Harry in the study seemed like a way for him to make a valuable contribution to helping families like ours with these kinds of decisions,” Tedesco said.

In addition to collecting research samples, the Del Monte Institute will also have a mobile vehicle that will allow them to travel between school and students’ homes to test and track those who may be positive.


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The intellectual landscape related to the administration of drugs to the body https://sohamsa.org/the-intellectual-landscape-related-to-the-administration-of-drugs-to-the-body/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 06:15:19 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/the-intellectual-landscape-related-to-the-administration-of-drugs-to-the-body/ Several innovative drug delivery technologies gained significant momentum (in terms of adoption and sales) soon after entering the market; most of them are designed to meet the unmet needs of administering complex pharmacological interventions Roots Analysis announced the addition of the report “Drug Delivery Devices on the Body – Intellectual Property Landscape: Focusing on Popular […]]]>

Several innovative drug delivery technologies gained significant momentum (in terms of adoption and sales) soon after entering the market; most of them are designed to meet the unmet needs of administering complex pharmacological interventions

Roots Analysis announced the addition of the report “Drug Delivery Devices on the Body – Intellectual Property Landscape: Focusing on Popular / Relevant Prior Art Research Phrases, Patent Assessment, Pockets of ‘innovation / white spaces and key candidate profiles’ to its list of offerings.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, more than 12,000 patents / patent applications have been granted / filed concerning drug delivery devices that can be worn on the body (or implanted), by industrial and non-industrial players. At present, innovation in this area is focused on the development of cheaper and more environmentally friendly drug delivery systems, with provisions to minimize / completely eliminate the risk of needle stick injuries. needle.

To order this report, presenting [A] a complete MS Excel data sheet and [B] a detailed summary in MS PowerPoint, please visit this link – https://www.rootsanalysis.com/reports/on-body-drug-delivery-devices-intellectual-property-landscape.html

Product highlights

Since 2001, more than 9,600 applications, involving different types of intellectual property documents, have been filed and published in different jurisdictions around the world.
Although several patents relating to body-mounted injectors have already been granted, the major body of published IP literature consists of patent applications; other important documents include research reports, amended patents, and limited patents.

Based on frequency of use, we’ve identified nearly 20 domain-specific terms that can be used for hard-hitting prior art searches.
An analysis of the titles of intellectual property documents related to this particular field revealed that infusion pumps, patch pumps and implants were the preferred choice of keywords describing this particular type of innovation. Most of the IP publications captured in the report describe technologies designed to facilitate the infusion (as seen in over 2300 titers) of pharmacological fluids.

Nearly 650 intellectual property publications have emerged as the most valuable documents related to innovations described in contemporary patent literature
Taking into consideration several relevant parameters, the report includes a benchmarking and competitive assessment, which offers important information on the various factors influencing the relative value associated with granted patents, patent applications and other publications of intellectual property related to drugs on the body (and implantable). delivery devices.

The report focuses on 40 key pockets of innovation (in terms of CPC families and symbols); there are also several companies trying to identify and address key white spaces
Given the primary focus of portable drug delivery solutions, most innovations in this area of ​​research focus on tools / technologies to safely facilitate the transfer of large volumes of fluids in the body. Despite the proven versatility of body-based / implantable therapy injectors, there are many unaddressed areas of concern (primarily related to improving drug delivery functionality) that are gradually being picked up by stakeholders.

To request a sample copy / brochure of this report, please visit this link – https://www.rootsanalysis.com/reports/on-body-drug-delivery-devices-intellectual-property-landscape.html

Answers to key questions
What are the different types of intellectual property documents that have been published in relation to devices for delivering drugs to the body?
What are the key search phrases that can be used to efficiently search technical documents, describing innovations in portable / implantable drug delivery solutions?
What is the relative value of a particular intellectual property document, or set of intellectual property documents, compared to others in the intellectual property landscape?
Who are the current owners of high value patents related to technologies for delivering drugs to the body?
What are the key areas of innovation and in what direction is research in this area likely to evolve in the future?
Who are the most prolific patent applicants in the body drug delivery device intellectual property landscape?

The research includes profiles of the main IP applicants (listed below) engaged in this field; each profile presents an overview of the company, financial information (if available) and its proprietary trends related to intellectual property.
Amgen
Becton Dickinson
Bigfoot Biomedical
Codman & Shurtleff
DCA Design International
Deka products
Insulet Corporation
Medtronic
Novo Nordisk
Roche (including contributions from Roche Diagnostics and Roche Diabetes Care)
Sanofi Aventis
Smiths Medical
Tandem diabetes care

For more details, please visit
https://www.rootsanalysis.com/reports/on-body-drug-delivery-devices-intellectual-property-landscape.html or send an email to sales@rootsanalysis.com

You may also be interested in the following titles:
1. Large Volume Portable Injector Market (5th Edition), 2020-2030
2. New Drug Reconstitution Systems Market: Industry Trends and Global Forecast, 2021-2030
3. New Ocular Drug Delivery Devices Market: Industry Trends and Global Forecast, 2021-2030

Contact:
Gaurav Chaudhary
+1 (415) 800 3415
+44 (122) 391 1091
Gaurav.Chaudhary@rootsanalysis.com

Contact:
Gaurav Chaudhary
gaurav.chaudhary@rootsanalysis.com

Root analysis
A430, 4th floor,
Bestech Business Towers, Sector 66, Mohali, India
sales@rootsanalysis.com
+1 (415) 800 3415
+44 (122) 391 1091
The Web: https://www.rootsanalysis.com/
LinkedIn: https://in.linkedin.com/company/roots-analysis
Twitter: https://twitter.com/RootsAnalysis

Roots Analysis is one of the fastest growing market research companies, sharing new and independent perspectives in the biopharmaceutical industry. In-depth research, analysis and ideas are carried out by an experienced management team who have acquired many years of significant experience in this industry. If you would like assistance in meeting the growing needs of your business, contact us at info@rootsanalysis.com

This version was posted on openPR.



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Geoff Johnson: Intellectual narcissism is a danger to public discourse https://sohamsa.org/geoff-johnson-intellectual-narcissism-is-a-danger-to-public-discourse/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/geoff-johnson-intellectual-narcissism-is-a-danger-to-public-discourse/ It’s hard to say which is the most destructive currently: the global spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus or the accompanying epidemic of irrational claims that spark the “debate” over vaccines, mask wear, role science and the imposition of social restrictions that are generally aimed at suppressing the spread of the deadly virus. In fact, […]]]>

It’s hard to say which is the most destructive currently: the global spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus or the accompanying epidemic of irrational claims that spark the “debate” over vaccines, mask wear, role science and the imposition of social restrictions that are generally aimed at suppressing the spread of the deadly virus.

In fact, it may be time to reassess the role of public education as a much-needed remedy for the ‘I have a right to my opinion’ thought.

There is a common saying among experienced educators: don’t teach students what to think; teach them to think.

This idea goes back at least to Socrates and it is what we call today the Socratic method of teaching.

The Socratic Method is a teaching method that promotes critical thinking by encouraging students to question their own unexamined beliefs, as well as the theories and opinions expressed by those around them.

On the one hand, children are exposed daily to a constant barrage of emotional thoughts that tend to dominate the discussion on any topic of any consequence – vaccination, climate change, freedom, gender confusion, even the role of religion in politics.

On the other hand, critical thinking validates evidence-based truth rather than emotion. This kind of thinking disavows the “this is what I want it to be” currently popular mark of magical thinking.

Grades 11 and 12 aren’t too early for 16 and 17 year olds to start learning to look for evidence that might even contradict their own early conclusions.

The problem with the rationale for the “I have a right to my opinion” fallacy is that all too often it is used to provide refuge for beliefs that should have long been abandoned.

It becomes a shorthand for “I can say or think whatever I want” – and by extension, continuing to argue against a point of view is sort of disrespectful.

This kind of intellectual narcissism is an increasingly destructive feature of our public discourse.

For example, there is the strongly expressed belief that, as a COVID denier, “my opinion on viral transmission is just as valid as that of Dr Bonnie Henry” – this despite the fact that Dr Henry has an international reputation. legitimately acquired as a leading epidemiologist and I cannot spell the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone to save myself – even though I knew what it was.

The philosopher José Ortega y Gasset wrote in his 1930 book The Revolt of the Masses: Imposing Your Opinions. It was the novelty: the right not to be right, not to be reasonable: the reason for unreason.

Maybe, but now more than ever teachers of all subjects owe it to them to teach them how to build and defend an argument – and to recognize when a belief has become untenable.

If there is one statement that should be discouraged in any classroom, it is the mantra “I have a right to my opinion – I have a right to my opinion”. It is, too often, used by people who should know it better as a cliché that ends thinking.

As philosopher Patrick Stokes has pointed out, the phrase is often used to defend factually indefensible positions.

Another philosopher, David Godden, argued that being entitled to any point of view requires the acceptance of certain obligations, such as the obligation to provide reasons for having that point of view. Again, to pretend otherwise is just intellectual laziness.

Godden called them the principles of rational law and rational responsibility, and advocated the teaching of these principles, including the notion that the obligation to provide reasons always involves a willingness to be comfortable in risking one’s own opinions against what may be the strength of the best reason.

Perhaps a good place to start with “how to think” in the classroom would be a review of the most commonly used “logical fallacies”.

A logical fallacy is a statement which, although at first glance it seems logical, turns out to be just a logical sleight of hand. “Ad hominem” attacks, which attack the adversary rather than his argument, fall into this category, as do non sequitur “everyone says” arguments and appeal to common prejudices about immigrant groups, native beliefs – or someone doesn’t like me.

As Ayn Rand, writer and champion of clarity of thought and objectivity, said: “Reason is the only way to acquire knowledge. The whole history of science is a progression of exploded errors.

gfjohnson4@shaw.ca

Geoff Johnson is a former superintendent of schools.

© Colonist of the time of copyright


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Ritwij Shandilya’s “The Prode” takes over YouTube podcast with intellectual content https://sohamsa.org/ritwij-shandilyas-the-prode-takes-over-youtube-podcast-with-intellectual-content/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 12:48:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/ritwij-shandilyas-the-prode-takes-over-youtube-podcast-with-intellectual-content/ The advent of digital media has made it possible for people to connect in ways that were unimaginable even a few decades earlier. Media platforms give socially isolated or distant people a chance to stay in tune with the activities of the community. In fact, they help facilitate conversations around many social, political, cultural, economic […]]]>

The advent of digital media has made it possible for people to connect in ways that were unimaginable even a few decades earlier. Media platforms give socially isolated or distant people a chance to stay in tune with the activities of the community. In fact, they help facilitate conversations around many social, political, cultural, economic and religious issues to provide the general masses with a better understanding of these issues. In a way, digital media platforms serve as a means to support the intellectual development of people. Given the power they wield, many young minds use platforms like YouTube to educate people about important social issues. One such enthusiastic young star is author turned journalist Ritwij Shandilya.

Ritwij Raj, better known by his pseudonym, Ritwij Shandilya, Indian author and journalist, created his YouTube channel “The Prode” in 2020 with the aim of bringing some of the important national and international issues to the fore. A graduate in journalism from the London School of Journalism, Ritwij has always been attentive to emerging issues in our society. At the same time, he felt the urgency to make people aware of these issues in order to improve intellectual literacy and critical thinking. So he started to formulate the idea of ​​taking the help of a medium like a podcast to reach his means and the result was ‘The Prode’.

The history of podcasts is older than you might think. Originally known as audio blogs, they provided a way for early bloggers to share their experiences and opinions using audio clips. However, this form of communication started to gain popularity in the early 2000s. The introduction of portable audio devices like iPod and MP3 during this period contributed to its growing popularity. As the world gets busier, the podcast format is also becoming more popular due to the unique multitasking opportunity it offers. An intellectual mind like Ritwij recognized the potential of podcasts to influence minds and decided to harness it by presenting intellectual content on contemporary issues of economics, defense, foreign affairs, law, society, literature and public policy.

“The Prode” is a digital media portal that features leading figures from around the world to discuss issues of national and international importance in an interview format. Using a platform like YouTube helps the channel reach a large number of target audiences and maximize the impact of the content simultaneously. Ritwij has interviewed prominent figures such as India’s former railroad minister Suresh Prabhu, India’s former finance minister Yashwant Sinha, former director general of military operations General Vinod Bhatia, the former Deputy Governor of the Reserve Bank of India, Dr Viral Acharya and others on his media portal, The Prode.

20-year-old editor-in-chief Ritwij leads the channel to success with confidence. He also participated in the world’s largest free literature festival, Zee Jaipur Literature Festival 2019 as a speaker and also wrote an English fiction novel titled “The Rise of Queen Revathi”. With his exposure and adventure in the literary world, he is expected to lead “The Prode” to its peak.

(Disclaimer – Trademark Office Content)


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