Scholar – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 18:17:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sohamsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Scholar – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ 32 32 South Thomaston, Frankfort scholars among Worthington winners at Husson https://sohamsa.org/south-thomaston-frankfort-scholars-among-worthington-winners-at-husson/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 17:15:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/south-thomaston-frankfort-scholars-among-worthington-winners-at-husson/ BANGOR – On September 14, Husson hosted an event at the Beardsley Meeting House to honor Worthington Scholarship Foundation scholars attending the university. A native of South Thomaston and a native of Frankfort were among those honorees. The Foundation has awarded $6.4 million to more than four hundred 2022 graduates from partner public high schools […]]]>

BANGOR – On September 14, Husson hosted an event at the Beardsley Meeting House to honor Worthington Scholarship Foundation scholars attending the university. A native of South Thomaston and a native of Frankfort were among those honorees.

The Foundation has awarded $6.4 million to more than four hundred 2022 graduates from partner public high schools in 11 Maine counties, including Franklin, Hancock, Knox, Lincoln, Oxford, Penobscot, Piscataquis, Sagadahoc, Somerset, Waldo and Washington . With the addition of high schools in Aroostook and Kennebec counties, the Foundation plans to award 800 new scholarships in 2023.

“I feel very privileged to be a Worthington Scholar,” said Frankfort student Mikaela Alley, who is enrolled in Husson University’s Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science/PhD in Physical Therapy program.

“Listening to the Worthingtons’ speeches at the event made me feel like they cared about me and would always have my back,” she said in a press release from the company. Husson University.

Dylan Whitamore, a fourth-year student at Husson University in South Thomaston who is studying primary education, agreed.

“Being a Worthington Scholar has helped me a lot and motivated me to be the best student and the best future teacher that I can be. I know the Foundation always has people to talk to if I need anything. They really mean a lot to me and I thank them for helping me to attend this university.

At the event, Beverly and David Worthington spoke to Scholars about their own experiences overcoming obstacles to achieve their educational goals. The Worthingtons also talked about how people were willing to provide help because they were both willing to do what was needed to be successful. Having achieved their educational goals, Beverly and David are now committed to helping students in Maine do the same.

“Worthington scholarships are awarded to students here at Husson who have significant academic potential,” said Dr. Robert A. Clark, President of the University. “We deeply appreciate the Worthingtons’ efforts to help keep education affordable in our state – an important goal that Husson University, as one of New England’s top educational values, enthusiastically shares and supports. .”

Worthington Scholars are selected on the basis of need and merit.

“We also choose our Scholars based on their courage and determination to build a better future for themselves and our belief that individual students can achieve their educational and career goals,” said Beverly Worthington. “To help these students, the Foundation provides Worthington Scholars with mentors to guide them through their journey. We’re in the scholarship corner every step of the way.

Worthington Scholarships are available to eligible students who recently graduated from Maine high schools on the Foundation’s list of “participating colleges.” Scholarships are renewable for up to eight semesters, and students can receive up to $17,000 to attend a four-year college or up to $14,250 if beginning their educational journey at a two-year Maine community college and continue at a four-year participating college. .

Lynne Coy-Ogan, EdD, senior vice president of academic affairs and provost of the university, Michael Fox, vice president of enrollment management at Husson, and Julie Bourgoin, executive director of the Worthington Scholarship Foundation, also took the speak at the event.

“This event was Husson’s way of saying that we believe in these students and want to support them as they prepare for their degrees,” Fox said. “We are confident they can do it.” The students at the reception appreciated the opportunity to meet the people who made their scholarships possible.

Thaddeus Fine is a freshman at Husson University’s New England School of Communications, pursuing a degree in video production. According to this student from Hampden, becoming a Worthington Scholar is more than just getting money to pay for your education.

“Becoming a Worthington Scholar means I’m part of a community,” he said. “There were a lot of different people at the event. We all had different backgrounds and we all came from different places here in Maine. No matter where we come from, we are all working towards the same goal of getting a degree. This is what unites us as a community. It’s not just a monetary connection, it’s also an emotional connection.

“Through the Worthington Scholarship Foundation, qualified Maine students can pursue a college education without having to take out additional loans to fund their education,” said Lynne Coy-Ogan, EdD, senior vice president of academic affairs and provost. “The support provided by the Worthington Scholarship Foundation will positively impact these Husson students for the rest of their lives. On behalf of everyone at the University, I would like to thank Beverly and David Worthington for making these generous scholarships possible. Our students are grateful beyond measure.

For more than 120 years, Husson University has demonstrated its adaptability and strength in delivering educational programs that prepare future leaders to meet the challenges of tomorrow through innovative undergraduate and graduate degrees. With a commitment to providing affordable classroom, online, and experiential learning opportunities, Husson University has become a top value in higher education. The characteristics of a Husson education include advanced knowledge provided through quality educational programs. According to a recent analysis of tuition and fees by US News & World Report, Husson University is one of the most affordable private colleges in New England. For more information on educational opportunities that can lead to personal and professional success, visit Husson.edu.

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Why Treasury’s Tom Scholar was sacked https://sohamsa.org/why-treasurys-tom-scholar-was-sacked/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 08:41:35 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/why-treasurys-tom-scholar-was-sacked/ This is an article from Iain Martin’s weekly newsletter for Reaction subscribers. Become a subscriber here. Things are also changing at Her Majesty’s Treasury, where a new Chancellor is hard at work preparing an emergency “tax event” will be introduced in the House of Commons on Friday. While much of the prime minister’s public attention […]]]>

This is an article from Iain Martin’s weekly newsletter for Reaction subscribers. Become a subscriber here.

Things are also changing at Her Majesty’s Treasury, where a new Chancellor is hard at work preparing an emergency “tax event” will be introduced in the House of Commons on Friday. While much of the prime minister’s public attention has been on the aftermath of the Queen’s death, attendance at services and the diplomatic and security conundrum of hosting world leaders, the Background work has been centered on preparing these announcements to launch the new administration’s program.

With the currency under severe strain, much depends on the ability of Kwarteng, chancellor, historian, to rise to the challenge.

He makes these preparations for his announcements – for tax cuts, some deregulation and various growth-friendly tweaks – without the help of a permanent secretary, the Treasury’s top official, because the incumbent of that position has was hit by the Chancellor when he took over. A search is underway for a replacement.

Researcher Sir Tom, a civil service veteran who has served prime ministers and chancellors for decades, was told by Kwarteng two weeks ago that his services were no longer needed. Scholar is said to have expressed some astonishment. Was the Chancellor really ending his 30-year career in public service? Yes, came the answer.

Scholar’s impeachment horrified former senior officials and some — note, not all — of the senior politicians he worked for. Since his dismissal, the airwaves and newspaper letter pages have featured numerous complaints from former Mandarins who detect quirks and an unwillingness on the part of Team Truss to listen to tough advice.

Lord Butler, a former cabinet secretary, fears the neutrality of the civil service is in jeopardy. Simon Case, the current cabinet secretary, shouldn’t he have defended Scholar?

When Lord Agnew, a former Treasury minister written in the Times, published a heartbreaking denunciation of Scholar last week, he was criticized by mandarins. Agnew was furious at fraud in the Covid business loan program and blames Scholar’s management of the Treasury. Agnew’s background is in the business world, and like many who move late and with trade reform zeal to a department like the Treasury, they find politics frustrating. A minister who is not the chancellor will often have surprisingly little access to the top of the department. The permanent secretary acts partly as a gatekeeper, carrying out the chancellor’s wishes. Resentments fester and, in Agnew’s case, turn into fury over the waste of public money. Resentment was also a feature of Liz Truss’ experience as chief secretary of the Treasury from 2017 to 2019, and it was a key factor in Scholar’s coup. More of which in a moment.

Before becoming chancellor, Kwarteng was warned by more than one person that on entering the Treasury he might need all the crisis-era political experience he could get his hands on. It’s always good to have someone on call who knows how and when to make the crucial call to the US Treasury, European Central Bank or IMF.

The sacked scholar was a veteran of the financial crisis. He was part of the HMT team that designed and implemented the bailout of the banking system when the economy boomed in 2008. He was a character in the bailout chapters of my book, Making it Happen: Fred Goodwin, RBS and the men who blew up Britain’s economypublished in 2013.

Interestingly, Scholar was not mentioned in Alistair Darling’s memoir during the financial crisis, although other officials were. The pair was not close. Something about Scholar’s mannerisms or sense of humor did not appeal to Darling when he was chancellor.

Prior to taking office, Kwarteng had considered phasing out Scholar, managing it, having it on hand at the Treasury for about six months during the immediate crisis while he identified a replacement.

Instead, in the days before they took office, the decision was made by the Prime Minister and Chancellor that it should be a clean break. The scholar had gone out.

Scholar was the head of EU negotiations for David Cameron before the 2016 referendum. He was never forgiven, it is said, by Truss and other Remainers who had to go through with Brexit after the referendum, for no not having gotten more from the EU in those pre-2016 talks. Truss was a eurosceptic who was persuaded by Cameron and Osborne to back Remain in 2016 on the back of the Scholar deal. She has since been reborn as a Brexiteer, approaching her job with the zeal of a convert and accepted as such by those who voted to leave.

More importantly, for Scholar, Liz Truss’ formative experience as Chief Secretary to the Treasury, under Philip Hammond in May’s government, was distinctly unhappy. To say that Philip Hammond, as chancellor, despised Truss is an understatement. Whispered stories circulated the moment she was cut. The atmosphere was deeply toxic.

As Jill Rutter of the Institute for Government pointed out last week, permanent secretaries to the Treasury have a history of giving the chief secretary only a limited role.

This, with Hammond, was much more than that. And Scholar, enthusiastically assisting his then-boss, Hammond, made himself very unpopular with Truss. It was a political miscalculation. It turns out that Philip “social kryptonite” Hammond was finished when Boris Johnson took over in 2019, and in the wacky races of British politics, Liz Truss beat her rivals to become Prime Minister three years later.

Some other ministers who worked with Truss earlier in her career found her difficult and uncharacteristically pushy about pursuing her own favorite projects.

Well, she has the power now. As Sir Tom Scholar can attest.

Write to us with your comments to be considered for publication at letters@reaction.life

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School honors Ted Walch with new arts scholarship – The Harvard-Westlake Chronicle https://sohamsa.org/school-honors-ted-walch-with-new-arts-scholarship-the-harvard-westlake-chronicle/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 17:06:14 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/school-honors-ted-walch-with-new-arts-scholarship-the-harvard-westlake-chronicle/ President Rick Commons announced the Ted Walch Scholar Endowment, named for former performing arts teacher Ted Walch, at an event celebrating his life and career Aug. 21. Created by Marc and Julie Platt (Samantha ’01, Jonah ’04, Hannah ’08, Ben ’11, Henry ’17), the scholarship will help provide financial aid to students interested in the […]]]>

President Rick Commons announced the Ted Walch Scholar Endowment, named for former performing arts teacher Ted Walch, at an event celebrating his life and career Aug. 21. Created by Marc and Julie Platt (Samantha ’01, Jonah ’04, Hannah ’08, Ben ’11, Henry ’17), the scholarship will help provide financial aid to students interested in the performing or film arts.

Walch taught each of Platt’s five children while they attended school. In 2014, the Platts established the Ted Walch Endowed Faculty Chair to honor Walch’s role as a teacher and mentor, who supports faculty compensation by paying the salary of whoever holds the endowed chair.

Commons said Walch was emotional when he heard the scholarship news.

“When I shared the news with Ted that there would now and forever be a scholarship at Harvard-Westlake in his name, he was overcome with tears of joy,” Commons said in his speech.

External Relations Manager Ed Hu said the Platts wanted to honor Walch by supporting the students because of the thousands of people he had impacted.

“Marc and Julie Platt asked [Commons] and me what they could do to honor Ted this time, mentioning that they wanted to focus on students and [Walch’s] lifelong dedication and the impact he had on so many children,” Hu said. “And so, the conversation turned to financial aid support, another top priority for the school. [The Platts] I loved the idea of ​​helping talented students with a passion for the performing arts or film who otherwise wouldn’t have the resources to attend Harvard-Westlake.

Isaac Tiu ’24 said he was moved by the Platts honoring Walch by supporting the performing arts.

“I was deeply inspired to hear about Platt’s donation,” Tiu said. “The performing arts benefit greatly from supporters like the Platt family. What really inspired me, however, was hearing that the scholarship would be named after Ted Walch. What a great way to keep his name alive.

Hu said the scholarship is an incredible way to honor Walch’s legacy and add to the lasting impact he had on the school.

“Not only does this gift support a top school priority to increase Harvard-Westlake’s socio-economic diversity, it ensures that Ted Walch’s name will be forever remembered and associated with Harvard-Westlake students in the fields that Ted cared about so deeply,” Hu said.

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Extremely high risk of a full-fledged US-Russian war: renowned Russian scholar https://sohamsa.org/extremely-high-risk-of-a-full-fledged-us-russian-war-renowned-russian-scholar/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 09:21:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/extremely-high-risk-of-a-full-fledged-us-russian-war-renowned-russian-scholar/ In the context of the conflict in Ukraine, the summit of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization which has just ended can announce a change in the world order, believes Russian specialist Anastasia Likhacheva. In a conversation with The New Indian in Moscow, the dean of the Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs of HSE University, […]]]>

In the context of the conflict in Ukraine, the summit of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization which has just ended can announce a change in the world order, believes Russian specialist Anastasia Likhacheva.

In a conversation with The New Indian in Moscow, the dean of the Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs of HSE University, said that Samarkand can herald a new order that promotes multipolarity.

The famous scholar also believed that Asia would unite against China if it tried to become a unilateral leader.

An edited excerpt from the interaction:

Aarti Tikoo: (Russian) President (Vladimir) Putin and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi met in Samarkand. They also attended the Shanghai Cooperation Organization meeting, which Chinese President Xi Jinping also attended. What do you think is the significance of this meeting in Samarkand when there is a war in Ukraine?

Anastasia Likhacheva: The importance of this meeting is very high. We remember the history of the great conferences of the 20th century, like Yalta, Tehran, etc., where the contours of the new order were discussed.

I think some hints of the coming order are also being discussed now and some narratives about what we understand as multipolarity. Because it is very favorable to all other powers except the United States.

TO: But at the same time, we see that the West has taken a very tough stance against Russia.

AL: Yes, I would say it’s pretty clear now that relations between Russia and the West are in the Hybrid War phase. And the further we go in time, the less hybrid it becomes and the more we see an old style of warfare. And unfortunately, I and my colleagues see that the risks of a major military confrontation between Russia and the West are extremely high.

We cannot imagine a full-scale nuclear war between Russia and the United States, because that would mean the end of the world as we know it. But on the other hand, we see all the steps towards this phase.

TO: So you agree that there will be an escalation of a military confrontation between Russia and the West?

AL: Well, I’d like to see a sign that we’re going another way, but I can’t.

TO: Which means, you say, that the war in Ukraine will continue and become more aggressive?

AL: I would not overlook the possibility that a direct military confrontation between Russia and Western parties could take place outside Ukraine.

Due to recent comments from the US command, they will supply another type of weapons to Ukraine. And the reverse comment from Russian officials that this will mean which side of the conflict the United States is on.

The way these weapons enter Ukraine, via Europe, makes the situation much more dangerous than six months ago.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin meet on the sidelines of the SCO summit

TO: Can Russia withstand the pressure of US sanctions? Because everyone says that the Russian economy is affected. Some people predicted that this would set Russia back 30 years economically.

AL: Russia suffered 30 years ago, when the whole collapse of the common economy system was much deeper, we had the country that was disrupted in 16 pieces and so far so on.

My particular opinion, especially regarding sanctions, is that almost any country can support if North Korea can support (economic sanctions). The question is how to balance the strategy of survival with the strategy of development.

What we see is that the situation in the world economy is getting worse. And if we talk about the situation in Europe and the United States in terms of inflation, it’s not easy either. It is therefore not a question of knowing exactly whether Russian GDP fell by 7.6% or 3.4%.

Some sanctions have significant economic effects. There are sanctions with a social impact that could be felt, but not so much economically.

TO: And in this whole scenario, where do you see China and India for that matter? Because starting today, they stand with Russia, even as they balance their relationship with the West.

AL: Russian officials now see India and China as rising powers, poles of economic development and potential economic partners for Russia. This means that many representatives of the Russian elite, the Russian managerial community and Russian companies, have to go through a very hard and deep transformation of their mindset.

I would say that it is very important to remember to go beyond these trade statistics. It is not just the supply of food or energy goods, the supply of energy security, food security and, therefore, social security as well, because of what we are seeing now in Sri Lanka.

But for the Russian elite, transforming their state of mind, seeing the map of the world, is important. It’s very difficult. When we studied geography in school, we made these country maps. And for generations we had the map of the world and it was like a big quarter, especially the map of Europe. We never had a map of Asia.

This is a very deep and deeply rooted asymmetry of world understanding. And now, how China and India behave in this situation is a very important trigger to change this mindset.

TO: And China hasn’t done anything so far, except maybe buy more Russian energy, probably mostly coal, and oil to some extent at a discount. Are there more expectations from China?

AL: We recently did some very interesting research based on statistics and figures, not statements and quotes. And we researched the logistics. How it changes between Russia and China. The cooperation is very intense, but of course it changes if we talk about the so-called global Chinese companies.

The importance of local Chinese companies is quite large for the Russian market. They are interested in cooperation. The Russians are very interested in cooperation. But it takes time to settle into this new infrastructure.

And also talking about Russian and Indian economic cooperation, we have to accept that the old school image of successful international cooperation, we have a nice forum where we have a nice statement, a big concert and a big party, press releases on new memorandums of understanding and agreements for millions and millions of investment intentions it’s over because even if it happens it’s not a good idea to promote it too widely.

So to analyze what is happening, we need to adjust our understanding a bit of how we assess successful economic cooperation under new circumstances.

TO: If China decides right now to invade Taiwan and make it part of it, do you think Russia would come to China’s aid?

AL: Well, I think if China decides to go down this path, it will have to rely on its efforts, just like Russia. In the Ukrainian file, Russia did not ask for help from China. When we saw a series of comments in Western media that China was not providing aid, there was no indication that Russia had asked for it. So I think if China decides to deal with Taiwan by any means in the state, it will rely on any means it controls.

TO: With a weaker America, will we say today that China has taken over as if not the world leader, but at least the undisputed leader of Asia?

A F: Strategically, while the US economy is still strong and very well funded from around the world, this regular trade deficit is well known. So it’s still there. It was there. It’s not the key market.

China is a rising leader. It’s obvious. But I am pretty sure that if China decided to become the unilateral leader of Asia, it would immediately lead to the joint unification of all other Asian states fearing that a single leader would rise. Because no one is interested in changing a leader into another leader.

And we see, of course, growing Chinese activity, especially economic activity in the region. But at the same time we see at least a multiplied attempt by the Russian Air Force and Indian efforts to keep an option of alternative development of the system in the greater Eurasian region, not just in Asia, based on the problems , based on BRICS formats, and based on strengthening Russian-Indian relations.

All this promotes strategic security in the Eurasian region, thanks to the problems we see on the way.

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Hawaiian woman passionate about kupuna service selected as Obama Foundation Fellow https://sohamsa.org/hawaiian-woman-passionate-about-kupuna-service-selected-as-obama-foundation-fellow/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 02:04:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/hawaiian-woman-passionate-about-kupuna-service-selected-as-obama-foundation-fellow/ HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – A Hawaiian woman passionate about serving the kupuna people has been selected as an Obama Foundation Scholar for the 2022-2023 academic year. Dr. Poki’i Balaz was chosen as one of two American scholars and the first from Hawaii to participate in the fifth cohort. Balaz is currently Head of Policy and Compliance […]]]>

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – A Hawaiian woman passionate about serving the kupuna people has been selected as an Obama Foundation Scholar for the 2022-2023 academic year.

Dr. Poki’i Balaz was chosen as one of two American scholars and the first from Hawaii to participate in the fifth cohort. Balaz is currently Head of Policy and Compliance for Lunalilo Home, a retirement home that serves Hawaii’s kupuna.

The Obama Foundation Scholars Program is made up of 30 emerging leaders from around the world who will study at Columbia University or the University of Chicago.

The program offers a hands-on leadership development curriculum, networking events, and more in the hope that scholars can expand their work upon returning home and make a positive difference in their communities.

“The Obama Scholars Program offers students the unique opportunity to give and gain insight into the work that other young leaders are doing in their communities, while talking about the intersectionality of their efforts through collaboration,” said said Obama Foundation Executive Director Valerie Jarrett in a statement.

“We look forward to welcoming the next cohort of Fellows to the Foundation family – a network of changemakers working tirelessly for a more equitable future.”

As a Native Hawaiian and geriatric nurse practitioner, Balaz has applied her experience and skills in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

She is also a member of the Native Hawaiian Health Advisory Board and the Policy Advisory Board for Elderly Affairs, which promotes aging population legislation in Hawaii.

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Moreno and Edgeston among ICC Foundation scholars | New https://sohamsa.org/moreno-and-edgeston-among-icc-foundation-scholars-new/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/moreno-and-edgeston-among-icc-foundation-scholars-new/ Several students from the area are the recipients of Foundation scholarships at Itawamba Community College for 2022-23. Aberdeen– Tyler Gill, Linda Kay Gilreath Fellowship; Taylor Harrison, Donald A. Baker Endowment Fellowship; Micah Terry, John and Beth Cleveland Endowment Scholarship; Kaleb Wilkinson, Thomas Griffith Memorial Annual Fellowship; Love – Ella Browning, AJ Pitts Memorial Scholarship; Matthew […]]]>

Several students from the area are the recipients of Foundation scholarships at Itawamba Community College for 2022-23.

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Tennessee State University Student Selected for Visa Black Scholarship Program https://sohamsa.org/tennessee-state-university-student-selected-for-visa-black-scholarship-program/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 00:15:27 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/tennessee-state-university-student-selected-for-visa-black-scholarship-program/ Nashville, Tenn. (TN Tribune) — Tennessee State University student Jala Turner has been selected for the Visa Black Scholarship Program. She is a freshman from Lawrenceville, Georgia. Turner received this prestigious scholarship for his dedication to academic excellence, commitment to financial literacy, and outstanding community service. She competed with high school students from across the […]]]>

Nashville, Tenn. (TN Tribune) — Tennessee State University student Jala Turner has been selected for the Visa Black Scholarship Program. She is a freshman from Lawrenceville, Georgia.

Turner received this prestigious scholarship for his dedication to academic excellence, commitment to financial literacy, and outstanding community service. She competed with high school students from across the country and was one of the few students in the state to be selected.

Turner is proud to represent Tennessee State University in this illustrious program. She is also a TSU cheerleader and excited to continue the legacy of attending Tennessee State University behind her parents, brother, and a host of family members.

The Thurgood Marshall, Visa Black Scholar program includes the following:

$20,000 annual scholarship

· Mentored a Visa employee throughout her 4 years of undergrad

· Year-round training

Opportunity to develop key technical, professional and leadership skills

In-Person Visa Summit at California Headquarters

Paid internship with Visa

Guaranteed job offer with Visa at the end of your studies

oh Must maintain GPA and other requirements to continue participating in the program

https://www.tmcf.org/students-alumni/corp-scholar-programs/visa-black-scholars-jobs-program/

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Mentors guide Franklin First Scholars on their journey to college https://sohamsa.org/mentors-guide-franklin-first-scholars-on-their-journey-to-college/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 16:30:03 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/mentors-guide-franklin-first-scholars-on-their-journey-to-college/ From left, Franklin Community High School seniors Olivia Rickelman, Lilly Wilson and Susan Crisafulli during an early scholar mentorship meeting at the school on Wednesday. ANDY BELL-BALTACI | DAILY NEWSPAPER At Franklin Community High School, 53 students have the opportunity to do what no one in their family has done before: go to college. The […]]]>

At Franklin Community High School, 53 students have the opportunity to do what no one in their family has done before: go to college.

The First Scholars program, created by Franklin School Board member Ryan Wagoner and operated by Franklin Education Connection, is in its sixth year. Non-senior students make up the bulk of the program with 21 representatives. Each student is paired with a mentor, who walks them through the college application and financial aid process, but some mentors go beyond what the job requires, by visiting the college with students and supervising them outside of the scheduled monthly mentorship time. .

Jessica Huezca is one of those seniors. The child of immigrants from Peru and Mexico, she has worked with her mentor Tara Rucker since her first year. The two went to Chicago to visit Northwestern University last summer. Although there’s a lot of weight and expectation on his shoulders, Rucker helped make the process more manageable, Huezca said.

“It’s a bit scary. My family is made up of immigrants who came to the United States and didn’t even graduate from high school. They love that I do this and they just want me to have a better opportunity,” she said.

Rucker has also seen Huezca develop since first meeting his freshman year.

“When we first met, she was a lot more shy. There was a lot of ‘I don’t know’. She seems to feel a lot more confident,” Rucker said. “I give her ideas, like ‘if you want to do this, contact this company.’ I just give him ideas, I don’t put his finger on the keyboard. This was helpful to me as I also have an elderly person. He guided me on what to do. Thanks to the information presented by the FAFSA and the university visits, I also learned to guide my children. »

For others, like senior Anna Peyton, who plans to go to the US Air Force Academy and study biomedical engineering, the mentor is someone to confide in.

“I think (it helps) to have someone outside of your family, to have someone you can talk to on a personal level. Sometimes you can be too scared to talk to a counselor who doesn’t don’t know you personally. I consider her an older friend,” Peyton said. “I didn’t have anyone in my family to guide me through (the college application process), so it’s It’s great to have someone to guide you through. Your mentor is right there for you.

Shellee Pietras, Peyton’s mentor, finds the program stimulating.

“My favorite thing is coaching girls and women that you can do whatever you want,” Pietras said. “I’ve helped kids over the years, and the most rewarding part is making sure people know they can excel. ‘Go ahead, don’t let anyone tell you you can’t.’

Lilly Wilson, also a senior, toured Butler University and Depauw University with her mentor, Franklin College English professor Susan Crisafulli.

“My mentor is amazing, she really helped me prepare for college. She helped me prepare for the SAT and she’s a really nice person to talk to, so that’s pretty neat,” Wilson said. “I feel very appreciated to have someone like that.”

Along with helping her mentee through the college application process, Crisafulli said she got to know Wilson on a personal level.

“Sometimes you get pressure from parents and younger siblings. Everyone places their hopes and dreams in you,” Crisafulli said. “I didn’t put a lot of pressure on (her) for college, but getting to know her and caring about her as a person is the most important thing.”

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A Civil War scholar will discuss Lee’s strengths https://sohamsa.org/a-civil-war-scholar-will-discuss-lees-strengths/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 10:00:15 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/a-civil-war-scholar-will-discuss-lees-strengths/ Appomattox has long served to mark the end of the American Civil War, but, in reality, it has “a far more controversial, uncertain, ambiguous, and lengthy ending,” says Caroline E. Janney, Ph.D., the John L Professor Nau III of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia. Janney, who is also Academic Director of […]]]>

Appomattox has long served to mark the end of the American Civil War, but, in reality, it has “a far more controversial, uncertain, ambiguous, and lengthy ending,” says Caroline E. Janney, Ph.D., the John L Professor Nau III of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia.

Janney, who is also Academic Director of the Nau Center for Civil War History, will introduce “An End or Beginning: Lee’s Army after Appomattox” when she speaks at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 22 in Benes Halls at Ohio Wesleyan University. Hamilton-Williams Campus Center, 40 Rowland Ave., Delaware.

Janney is the author of seven books, including “Ends of War: The Unfinished Fight of Lee’s Army after Appomattox,” for which she won the 2022 Gilder-Lehrman Lincoln Prize. The annual award, which includes a $50,000 prize , is awarded to the best scholarly work written in English on Abraham Lincoln, the American Civil War soldier or the American Civil War era.

Of his book, James G. Basker, President of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, said, “Deeply researched and beautifully written, ‘Ends of War’ allows us to see into the hearts and minds of Confederate soldiers in during the crucial weeks and months. of the turbulent end of the civil war. It is one of the best history books I have ever read and the story it tells still resonates in our country today.

The jury that assessed the nominees for the 2022 award said: “The story Janney tells is so compelling that readers can sometimes forget they already know the outcome. In short, Janney manages to say something new and important about the Civil War, using a diversity of voices, including soldiers and civilians, political and military leaders, and liberated people.

In addition to her roles at the University of Virginia, Janney is past president of the Society of Civil War Historians and editor of the Civil War America series at the University of North Carolina Press. Her other books include “Remembering the Civil War: Reunion and the Limits of Reconciliation” and “Burying the Dead but Not the Past: Ladies’ Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause.”

Janney’s presentation is the 2022 Richard W. Smith Ohio Wesleyan Lecture on Civil War History. The Smith Lecture is named for Richard W. Smith, Ph.D., a retired history professor who taught at OWU between 1950 and 1986. Past lecturers in the series, which began in 2002 included Pulitzer Prize winner James M McPherson, author of “Battle Cry Freedom: The Civil War Era”.

Learn more about the OWU History Department and the annual Smith Lecture at www.owu.edu/history.

Janey

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Kwarteng sacks dry permanent treasure Tom Scholar https://sohamsa.org/kwarteng-sacks-dry-permanent-treasure-tom-scholar/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 16:49:43 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/kwarteng-sacks-dry-permanent-treasure-tom-scholar/ The new Chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng has effectively sacked the Permanent Secretary to the Treasury, Sir Tom Scholar. The Treasury announced this afternoon it was launching a search for a new senior civil servant after Kwarteng called for a ‘change of leadership’ less than 48 hours into his term as Chancellor of the Exchequer. Treasury Director […]]]>

The new Chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng has effectively sacked the Permanent Secretary to the Treasury, Sir Tom Scholar.

The Treasury announced this afternoon it was launching a search for a new senior civil servant after Kwarteng called for a ‘change of leadership’ less than 48 hours into his term as Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Treasury Director General for Tax and Social Care Beth Russell and Public Expenditure Director Cat Littlle will lead the department as acting permanent secretaries while a new dry perm is selected.

Scholar, who has been the Treasury’s top dog for the past six years, surprised many when he was offered a second five-year term at a time when other senior officials such as Sir Simon McDonald and Jonathan Slater were purged from their posts.

Kwarteng and Cabinet Secretary Simon Case paid tribute to Scholar’s 30-year career in public service, the peak of which saw him serve under six chancellors – three of them in the past two months.

However, a succinct three-sentence quote from Scholar painted a clear picture of the course of events.

“The Chancellor has decided it is time to change direction at the Treasury, and so I will be leaving with immediate effect,” he said.

“It has been the privilege of my career to lead this great institution since 2016. I wish the Treasury the best for the times to come, and I will cheer them on from behind the scenes.”

Scholar’s predecessor as Director of the Treasury, Lord Nick Macpherson, disparaged Kwarteng’s decision.

“Tom Scholar is the finest civil servant of his generation. Sending it back makes no sense,” he wrote on Twitter.

“His experience would have been invaluable in the coming months as government policy puts massive upward pressure on the cost of funding. As Gordon Brown used to say “they don’t think”.

Case said he wanted to thank Scholar both professionally and personally for his “remarkable” public service and leadership.

“Tom has been an unwavering and loyal colleague to many of us – and we will be forever grateful for his wise counsel, generosity, humor and decency,” he said.

Kwarteng said Scholar had been a “dedicated and exemplary public servant” who helped lead the Treasury and government through many challenges, and that he left public service with “the highest honour”.

During his time in public service, Scholar advised successive prime ministers and chancellors on international and economic issues, and served as the UK’s representative to the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

He became a dry Treasury perm in the final days of George Osborne’s time as Chancellor, then went on to serve under Philip Hammond, Sajid Javid, Rishi Sunak, Nadhim Zahawi and – very briefly – Kwarteng.

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