Scholar – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ Mon, 16 May 2022 13:52:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sohamsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-3-150x150.png Scholar – Sohamsa http://sohamsa.org/ 32 32 UWF Alumni Credit NIH-funded MARC Scholars Program Offers Them STEM Opportunities https://sohamsa.org/uwf-alumni-credit-nih-funded-marc-scholars-program-offers-them-stem-opportunities/ Mon, 16 May 2022 13:43:34 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/uwf-alumni-credit-nih-funded-marc-scholars-program-offers-them-stem-opportunities/ The three graduates will continue their studies in prestigious universities in the southern United States. Nigro will attend the Coastal Sciences PhD program at the University of Southern Mississippi, where she was awarded the Coastal Sciences in Support of Diversity Fellowship. She plans to study the behavioral ecology and physiology of crab species with a […]]]>

The three graduates will continue their studies in prestigious universities in the southern United States. Nigro will attend the Coastal Sciences PhD program at the University of Southern Mississippi, where she was awarded the Coastal Sciences in Support of Diversity Fellowship. She plans to study the behavioral ecology and physiology of crab species with a focus on climate change. Nigro said participating in the MARC Scholars program changed his life.

“Being a student raised in poverty, I was totally unsure of what my future held. I knew the goals I wanted to achieve, but it didn’t seem realistic to achieve those goals with my financial background and I was consumed by impostor syndrome.When I was accepted into the program, I had no idea of ​​the success and foundations that lay ahead.MARC is where my passion for research was blooming.

Nigro ultimately wants to become a researcher and professor at a university where she can conduct her own research in marine behavioral ecology.

While at UWF, MARC Scholars, alongside faculty researchers, complete a sustained research project that spans from the summer before their freshman year through graduation. UWF faculty mentors provide essential support, guiding these academically talented students and taking their research to the next level. Each student must participate in off-campus research during the summer before their senior year, as well as additional academic requirements. Drake is a first generation student. She, Nigro, and Epps became MARC Fellows in the summer of 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic was in full swing.

“The faculty and staff running MARC at UWF have been very supportive and accommodating during this difficult time,” Drake said. “They provided us with masks throughout the pandemic, worked with us on our summer research plans, helped identify career-beneficial actions that could be done remotely, helped us stay on on track with coursework, held professional development workshops, and worked tirelessly to not let the pandemic completely halt our productivity as undergraduate research students.

The pandemic and personal issues presented challenges during her time as a researcher, but Drake said the program helped her overcome those obstacles.

“MARC provided me with a cohort of other high-achieving students who were in the same position as me, going through similar setbacks and victories,” she said. “It was good to have that feeling
from the community.

Drake has accepted an offer to join the University of Florida’s Analytical Chemistry PhD program, where she will study cancer and disease using microfluidic devices, starting this summer.

Epps was accepted to the doctoral and master’s programs, but made the decision to attend
The University of Georgia to get his master’s degree. If she enjoys studying marine conservation and has a passion to pursue research in this area, she plans to pursue a PhD.

“Before becoming a MARC Scholar, I had never even thought of going to graduate school or doing research. It gave me the opportunity to learn more about graduate school and research,” Epps said. “I’ve also met some amazing mentors and students along the way. Personally, I think MARC helped me come out of my shell a little more than before I arrived. It is a program that has encouraged continuous growth and personal development.

The MARC Scholars Program is a grant-funded training program sponsored by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, one of 27 separate institutes and centers that make up the National Institutes of Health.

For more information on the UWF MARC Scholars program, visit uwf.edu/hmcse.

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Academics to gather in Barcelona for Global Higher Education Week https://sohamsa.org/academics-to-gather-in-barcelona-for-global-higher-education-week/ Sat, 14 May 2022 20:13:35 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/academics-to-gather-in-barcelona-for-global-higher-education-week/ Thousands of students will gather in Barcelona from May 16-20 for World Higher Education Week, during which World Higher Education Week and the UNESCO World Conference on Higher Education will be held. higher, authorities said. According to Spain’s official news site, around 2,000 people will attend the event in person while another 8,000 in virtual […]]]>

Thousands of students will gather in Barcelona from May 16-20 for World Higher Education Week, during which World Higher Education Week and the UNESCO World Conference on Higher Education will be held. higher, authorities said.

According to Spain’s official news site, around 2,000 people will attend the event in person while another 8,000 in virtual format, reports SchengenVisaInfo.com.

During Global Higher Education Week 2022, various events to discuss the future of higher education will take place in Barcelona.

Applauding the occasion, the Secretary General of Universities, Jose Manual Pigarron, said that the climate of collaboration existed between the institutions to organize these events, while a priority objective for all the institutions is to place higher education in a central place for a week in order to offer a better service to our changing society.

On the other hand, the Minister of External Action, Victoria Alsina, said that for one week Barcelona will serve as the capital of education for one week.

“The desire is to serve as the first stone to ensure that Barcelona, ​​and Catalonia, is a center of knowledge of reference for its vast network of universities and research centers. We want to take advantage of the dynamism and efforts to crystallize new projects, such as the creation in Barcelona of a UNESCO institute specializing in higher education. Rest assured that if UNESCO seeks a partner to develop this initiative, it will find one in the Government of Catalonia. noted Alsina.

Other participating institutions include the Union for the Mediterranean, the Ibero-American General Secretariat (SEGIB), Menéndez Pelayo University, Times Higher Education magazine, La Caixa Foundation, several international university networks, the Ministry of Universities, the Generalitat de Catalunya, the Barcelona City Council, ACUP and the Conference of Rectors of Spanish Universities (CRUE).

According to the World Conference on Higher Education, representatives believe that this event allows the city to show its position as a world reference for a university city.

“After a few years of forced and sudden changes, it is the right time to rethink education The world The conference organized by UNESCO in Barcelona next week is an excellent opportunity to reflect and discuss what higher education should be and what it should do to meet the demands of a knowledge society”, Jaume Puy, rector of the University of Leida.

Puy also stressed that the work of universities intends to lead to a more sustainable, open, inclusive society, concerned with the well-being of people.

>> Minister of Tourism: Spain is a pioneer in the implementation of social sustainability plans

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Auburn High School Named National Merit Scholar https://sohamsa.org/auburn-high-school-named-national-merit-scholar/ Thu, 12 May 2022 21:05:00 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/auburn-high-school-named-national-merit-scholar/ ROCKFORD, Ill. (WIFR) – A high school student from Auburn was announced on Tuesday as one of the 2022 National Merit Scholarship recipients. Puranjay Gupta is part of a second announcement of program winners and will receive the prestigious $2,500 award as well as a Merit Scholar. Puranjay “Jay” Gupta is enrolled in Auburn High […]]]>

ROCKFORD, Ill. (WIFR) – A high school student from Auburn was announced on Tuesday as one of the 2022 National Merit Scholarship recipients.

Puranjay Gupta is part of a second announcement of program winners and will receive the prestigious $2,500 award as well as a Merit Scholar.

Puranjay “Jay” Gupta is enrolled in Auburn High School’s Gifted Academy and plans to study medicine after graduating in June.(Rockford Public Schools District 205)

This series of winners are finalists from each state judged to have the strongest combination of achievement, skill, and potential for success in future study.

Auburn Elders Alexander Ferry and Puranjay Gupta were named finalists in February for the scholarship; they were announced as semi-finalists in September for the 67th annual National Merit Scholarship program. Both students attended Gifted Academy in Auburn.

Gupta plans to study medicine after graduating from Auburn in June.

Rockford Public Schools announced the victory in their Bulletin 205 VIBE Thursday.

2,500 Merit Scholar Program winners were chosen from more than 15,000 finalists. By the end of the year, nearly 7,500 academic champions will receive a total of $28 million in scholarships.

Copyright 2022 WIFR. All rights reserved.

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University of Alberta alumnus Justyce Yuille selected as Marshall-Motley Scholar https://sohamsa.org/university-of-alberta-alumnus-justyce-yuille-selected-as-marshall-motley-scholar/ Wed, 11 May 2022 05:15:04 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/university-of-alberta-alumnus-justyce-yuille-selected-as-marshall-motley-scholar/ Photo submitted Justyce Yule Honors U of A graduate Justyce Yuille, who earned a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science, African and African American Studies, and Criminal Justice, cum laudein 2020, is one of 10 students selected nationally to participate in the Marshall-Motley Scholars Program. Funded by the NAACP Legal Defense and […]]]>



Photo submitted

Justyce Yule

Honors U of A graduate Justyce Yuille, who earned a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science, African and African American Studies, and Criminal Justice, cum laudein 2020, is one of 10 students selected nationally to participate in the Marshall-Motley Scholars Program.

Funded by the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Marshall-Motley Scholars Program was launched last year to create a pipeline that “will equip the South with the next generation of civil rights attorneys trained to provide legal defense of unparalleled excellence in the pursuit of racial justice”.

In return for a full legal scholarship and professional development opportunities, Marshall-Motley Scholars commit to dedicating the first eight years of their careers to the practice of civil rights law in service to Black communities. from South.

“During her time at the University of Arkansas, Justyce distinguished herself academically, organizing her studies in such a way that she gained a broad understanding of the complicated relationship between race, social justice, and justice. legal system, preparation that will serve her well as she studies law,” said Acting Chancellor Charles F. Robinson.

A PASSION FOR RACIAL JUSTICE

Yuille credits her passion for racial justice to her faith and her family, who have long been community leaders and changemakers.

“My grandmother Hazel Bogard is 97 and during the civil rights movement she was president of the NAACP chapter in Little Rock,” Yuille said. “She moved into Bishop Street –– a white neighborhood –– and the Ku Klux Klan surrounded her house and tried to force her out of town. But she persevered, and that inspires me to continue the fight for racial justice.

Yuille served as the first vice president of the U of A chapter of the NAACP, as well as the first African-American chief justice in campus history for the U of A Associated Student Government. She interned at the Terrorism Research Center and the Fulbright Advisory Center and was a Black Alumni Society Fellow from 2018-2020. Active in the Jane B. Gearhart Full Circle Food Pantry, Razorback Food Recovery, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. , she was awarded the Volunteer of the Year by the Black Students Association and the Black Alumni Scholars in 2019.

After graduating from the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, Yuille was selected for a prestigious internship with the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation in 2020, which offered a front row seat to the story during the summer of civil unrest after the murder of George Floyd. She was also a marketing and research intern at the Woman’s National Democratic Club Educational Foundation.

Additionally, Yuille was an AmeriCorps teacher for Great Oaks Charter School in Wilmington, Delaware, where she taught English and social studies to 125 students. Currently, she is a research and communications intern for Issue One, a cross-partisan political reform group based in Washington, DC. FEC vs. Ted Cruz for Senate. She is also an intern for Nate Fleming’s campaign for the District of Columbia Council At-Large.

“Justyce was an outstanding student here on campus, and I am thrilled to see her selected for this prestigious honor,” said Lynda Coon, Dean of Honors College. “We look forward to following her career as a legal champion for racial justice.”

Yuille has not yet decided which law school she will attend but has committed to choosing a school in the South.

“Eventually, I would like to become a judge,” she says.

About the University of Arkansas: As Arkansas’ flagship institution, the U of A offers an internationally competitive education in more than 200 academic programs. Founded in 1871, the U of A contributes more than $2.2 billion for Arkansas’ economy through the teaching of new knowledge and skills, entrepreneurship and employment development, discovery through research and creative activity while providing training in professional disciplines. The Carnegie Foundation ranks the U of A among the few American colleges and universities with the highest level of research activity. US News and World Report ranks the U of A among the top public universities in the nation. Find out how the U of A is working to build a better world in Arkansas Research News.

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Polk State Metallica Scholar overcomes adversity and has opportunity to take guitar business to next level https://sohamsa.org/polk-state-metallica-scholar-overcomes-adversity-and-has-opportunity-to-take-guitar-business-to-next-level/ Mon, 09 May 2022 13:04:42 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/polk-state-metallica-scholar-overcomes-adversity-and-has-opportunity-to-take-guitar-business-to-next-level/ posted on Monday, May 9, 2022 by Polk Newsroom As a musician, Noel Rosa’s resume speaks for itself, but there have been many trials and tribulations along the way. Rosa, 55, of Lakeland, takes great pride in finding solutions to her own problems. This time he got help from a non-profit organization founded by another […]]]>

posted on by Polk Newsroom

As a musician, Noel Rosa’s resume speaks for itself, but there have been many trials and tribulations along the way. Rosa, 55, of Lakeland, takes great pride in finding solutions to her own problems.

This time he got help from a non-profit organization founded by another group of well-known musicians. Through Metallica’s All Within My Hands Foundation, in partnership with the American Association of Community Colleges, Rosa receives valuable training in CNC machining at Polk State College free of charge. His new skills will greatly help his guitar company, New Sound Acoustics.

“It was incredible help at a time when I needed it most,” he said. “I am so grateful for this opportunity because I could never have afforded to take this course without the Metallica scholarship. The fact that they are doing this is absolutely amazing.

All Within My Hands aims to build sustainable communities by supporting workforce education, hunger relief and other essential local services. The Polk State Corporate College CNC Machining program is a high-intensity, eight-week course that prepares students for in-demand, high-paying careers and is supported by the Metallica Scholars initiative.

“I could see a person who really wants to excel and improve and they can’t afford to do that,” Rosa said. “To be able to receive this grant to take a course like this that will enrich their lives with a better salary and with a set of skills that they did not have before; now it’s life changing.

“It doesn’t just change the life of the person, but it changes the life of their children, their family, their community,” he added. “The impact this has on a large ripple scale is absolutely amazing. Props and thanks to Metallica and their…foundation for making such a great thing.

“A natural passion”

Rosa’s passion for music goes back as far as he can remember. His family members remember him dancing on the radio when he was young. His first drum set came at age 5 and featured Snoopy from Charles Schulz’s comic strip, “Peanuts”.

“It’s just a natural passion,” he said.

For more than 30 years, Rosa has been touring and performing in musical shows. A man of Christian faith, Rosa has opened for Switchfoot and Eddie Money as well as other well-known contemporary Christian bands such as DC Talk and Audio Adrenaline.

Born in the projects of northern New Jersey, Rosa’s musical career began in church. By the age of 8, he was playing for local churches. Rosa was signed to CBS Records shortly after high school.

“I had two absolutely amazing parents,” Rosa said. “You couldn’t ask for better parents than my parents.

“I grew up basically in the church environment, surrounded by a strong – very loving – community,” he added. “Really, that’s where my music blossomed.”

Through adversity comes opportunity

In the 1990s, an injury from a car accident limited Rosa’s ability to play the drums. To avoid having to give up or take an extended break from music, a fellow musician urged Rosa to learn to play the guitar. Four years later, he won his first prize as a guitarist.

Following a performance in 2009, Rosa’s ability to play the guitar was also in jeopardy after a large piece of equipment fell on her. The accident caused Rosa severe back pain. Thanks to its new fight against adversity, New Sound Acoustics was born.

“I couldn’t find a guitar that was light enough that I didn’t mind performing on stage, so basically I did a worldwide search and wasn’t happy with anything I found, so I designed my own guitar,” he said. “I toured with it and said, ‘I’ll never tour with another guitar again.’ It’s the best sound-wise and it weighs only three pounds.

New Sound Acoustics manufactures custom lightweight acoustic guitars. With her arms and shoulders unable to support the weight of a typical guitar, Rosa’s creation allowed her to continue performing and touring. He soon learned that his creation had market demand.

Originally, Rosa thought his target audience would be millennials, as he marketed his product as the next generation guitar. Soon after, he learned that older musicians suffering from bumps, bruises, aches and pains saw his product as a remedy to keep playing while limiting stress on the body.

“While I was on tour, other professional artists started asking me for these guitars and the entrepreneurial light bulb went out,” he said.

Another roadblock

In 2016, Rosa’s career hit another hurdle. While on tour, Rosa found herself struggling with feelings of great fatigue. Shortly after, he was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer and was forced to stop filming for a year.

“When I was diagnosed, I said, ‘How soon can we get rid of this thing and treat it?’ “, he recalls.

Divorced father of three – Gavin, 22, Megan, 16, and Grayson, 5 – Rosa’s cancer is currently in remission. When Rosa arrived at Polk State to begin the eight-week program, he still had to take oxygen. Rosa said he was grateful for the understanding of fellow students, staff and Professor James Gibbons – better known as “Mr. Gib” – were of his situation.

“The staff here are absolutely amazing,” Rosa said. “I was blown away by how kind Jamie (Rowan), the program director, and ‘Gibb’, my teacher, were and were so accommodating. They took all the fear away.

Lessons learned and what comes next

Since starting her business in 2009, Rosa has sold thousands of custom guitars. The designs are his own, but so far he has had to outsource the manufacturing. Once the program is complete, Rosa will be able to do the work that he currently contracts out himself.

“The course was absolutely amazing,” he said. “It will save my business thousands of dollars.”

Rosa works from the Lakeland-based incubator called Catapult. He looks forward to the day when he can produce guitars with the machines he once had to pay to run.

“I felt every time I walked into Catapult that I didn’t have the knowledge to operate these machines, but I’m producing this amazing product,” Rosa said. “By taking the course, it will give me the ability to operate the machines, to know the machines and to know the guitars…from their inception.”

The Maker Space, where guitars are made at Catapult, opened in July 2021. Catapult President Christin Strawbridge is excited about what the CNC program is accomplishing.

“What we’re seeing is that there’s a real labor demand for people using these types of machines,” she said. “For Polk State, working to meet that demand is truly a wonderful thing.”

Rosa said he appreciates how nice the machines are on campus and the tutelage his professor gives. Gibbons, Rosa said, teaches according to the books, but has four decades of real-world experience explaining how concepts translate to the workforce.

“My favorite thing about this class is the way my teacher teaches it,” Rosa said. “He walks us through the formulas, the math and why it’s important that everything lines up perfectly.”

Besides touring and designing guitars, Rosa also enjoys teaching and trying to inspire others. He conducts guitar clinics and workshops at high schools, colleges and other local venues. Rosa also uses these opportunities to talk motivation and share her story.

“I like to keep busy, but I make sure to manage my time and spend time with my kids and my family and balance the things that I have to do professionally,” he said.

Rosa is expected to graduate in early May.

“What I plan to do after I graduate is develop New Sound Acoustics, start working with a new producer on a new album, start touring again,” he said. “My goal is to grow my guitar business and there are also other products in the music industry that I have patents for and want to produce.”

Over the past 13 years, Rosa has sold thousands of custom guitars to musicians around the world. He hopes that the legendary group that gave him this opportunity will have the chance to use his flagship product.

“I want Metallica to play my guitars,” Rosa said. “Absolutely.”

The next class of Polk State Metallica Scholars will begin on August 8. More information is available at www.polk.edu/metallica.

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Thirty-seven St. John’s Prep college-athletes take the next step https://sohamsa.org/thirty-seven-st-johns-prep-college-athletes-take-the-next-step/ Sat, 07 May 2022 13:28:43 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/thirty-seven-st-johns-prep-college-athletes-take-the-next-step/ More than their fair share for these Danvers Eagle seniors Chad Konecky | Special for Wicked Local St. John’s Prep of Danvers Athletics is proud to recognize more than three dozen Eagles student-athletes, including two favorites, who have committed to compete at the college of their choice beginning next fall. College athletes representing 10 sports […]]]>


More than their fair share for these Danvers Eagle seniors

St. John’s Prep of Danvers Athletics is proud to recognize more than three dozen Eagles student-athletes, including two favorites, who have committed to compete at the college of their choice beginning next fall. College athletes representing 10 sports commitment letters signed last week during the NCAA’s ongoing signing periods.

In context, the sheer number of future varsity athletes coming out of the prep campus this year isn’t terribly surprising. After all, Eagle teams have collectively produced nine state titles in the past 12 months – twice in wrestling and once each in lacrosse, golf, cross country, mountain biking, swimming, skiing and ice hockey.

“What a great time of year and what a remarkable accomplishment for all of our student-athletes, their families, teammates and coaches,” said St. John’s Prep Athletic Director Jameson Pelkey. “These signings are a testament to all the time, energy and effort our guys have invested over the years. We congratulate them and wish them the best.”

Signatories to this St. John’s recruiting window, who represent 23 North Shore towns and cities, plus two more in New Hampshire, are listed by sport and position below. Eight of the head coaches of these athletes in the 10 sports are also St. John’s Prep graduates.

A primary provision of the NCAA’s National Letter of Intent Program is that competing collegiate athletic programs must cease recruiting a prospective student-athlete once an NLI is signed with another institution. Athletic scholarship assistance is renewed annually at the discretion of each school’s athletic department.

The signing period for Division I college football ended on April 1, while the basketball signing window closes on May 18. Division II football student-athletes, as well as anyone who plays other Division I and II sports, must sign up by August 1. With the NCAA’s first signing window last December, the prep announced 10 more signers across six sports.

Baseball

Right-handed pitcher Griffin Callanan (North Reading), University of Hartford; catcher and outfielder Cam Wodarski (Danvers), St. Joseph’s College (Maine); and right-handed outfielder and pitcher Shane Williams (Georgetown), Salve Regina University (RI).

Team

coxswain Cooper Dunagan (Byfield), Colgate University (NY); Starboard Robert Arsenault (Danvers), Tufts University; Starboard Alex Flynn (Wilimington), Tufts University; Port Thomas Dufour (Beverly), Skidmore College (NY); and port/starboard Josh Atkinson (Haverhill), Union College (NY).

Soccer

Running back James Guy (Lynn), Bentley University; defensive back Matt Mitchell (Medford), Union College (NY); defensive back Ryan Grenier (Salem, NH), Union College (NY); offensive lineman Kyle Webster (North Andover), Union College (NY); quarterback Jack Perry (Newbury), Bates College; defensive tackle Dylan Roberts (Swampscott), Bates College; linebacker Dylan Wodarski (Danvers), University of New England (Maine); offensive lineman Hudson Kortbus (Lexington), University of New England (Maine); linebacker Ethan Barnes-Felix (North Reading), Beloit College (Wisconsin); linebacker Conan Keefe (Andover), Norwich University (Vt.); linebacker and kicker Charlie Stark (Topsfield), Stonehill College; offensive lineman Jake Cuddire (Peabody), University of New Hampshire (favorite walk); and offensive lineman Kurt Plakans (Marblehead), Fordham University (favorite walk).

Golf

Brendan O’Holleran (Hamilton South), Middlebury College.

The Crosse

Attackman Mace Collins (Swampscott), Norwich University (Vt.); defenseman Tim Haarmann (Boxford), MIT; midfielder Charlie Wilmot (Topsfield), Wesleyan University (Conn.); and defenseman Luca Winter (Swampscott), Union College (NY).

Veil

Charles Maier (Wenham), Williams College; Kique Ruiz (Swampscott), Bowdoin College; and Joseph Cunniff (Marblehead), Fairfield University.

Football

goalkeeper Joey Waterman (North Andover), Middlebury College; and midfielder James Gikas (Boxford), Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

Swim

Jake Thomas (Wenham, breaststroke, 200 yard medley), WPI; and Ethan Olivo (Andover, 50, 100 yard freestyle), Hamilton College (NY).

Track

Luke Santos (Exeter, NH, distance events), Colorado College; Tyee Ambrosh (Danvers, sprinter), Babson College; and Jason Bois (Stoneham, hurdler, sprinter, high jumper), Union College (NY).

wrestling

Adam Schaeublin (Salem, 132-pound wrestler in 2021-22), Trinity College (Conn.).

Chad Konecky is a communications specialist for St. John’s Prep.

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Remembering the vision and kindness of Hugo Sonnenschein as a leader and scholar of UChicago | Kenneth C. Griffin Department of Economics https://sohamsa.org/remembering-the-vision-and-kindness-of-hugo-sonnenschein-as-a-leader-and-scholar-of-uchicago-kenneth-c-griffin-department-of-economics/ Thu, 05 May 2022 20:39:29 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/remembering-the-vision-and-kindness-of-hugo-sonnenschein-as-a-leader-and-scholar-of-uchicago-kenneth-c-griffin-department-of-economics/ Posted by mheinl on May 5, 2022 Colleagues, friends and family share memories of the 11th president at the April 30 memorial service Leaders and colleagues from the University of Chicago joined friends and family of the late Hugo Sonnenschein this past weekend to honor the University’s 11th President, share warm personal memories, and reflect […]]]>

Posted by mheinl on May 5, 2022

Colleagues, friends and family share memories of the 11th president at the April 30 memorial service

Leaders and colleagues from the University of Chicago joined friends and family of the late Hugo Sonnenschein this past weekend to honor the University’s 11th President, share warm personal memories, and reflect on his profound impact as a leader, economist and mentor.

Sonnenschein, who led the University through transformative change during his tenure from 1993 to 2000, died on July 15, 2021 at the age of 80. as well as personal kindness as a colleague and friend.

“Along the arc of any university, each president plays an important role in helping the institution and the community that composes it to evolve and grow,” said President Paul Alivisatos. “Often it is only over time that the magnitude of the impact of such changes can be fully understood and appreciated.”

Alivisatos noted that the foundational work Sonnenschein did laid the foundation for the College’s remarkable transformation. “Of course, not everyone agreed with Hugo on his ideas – and it wouldn’t be the University of Chicago if they did. But I think we can all agree that his ideas have stood the test of time,” Alivisatos said.

Chancellor and President Emeritus Robert J. Zimmer said Sonnenschein was able to create lasting impact through an independence of perspective and questioning, which he applied equally whether he was solving an economic problem or runs the university.

“His focus on thinking about the right questions and the right way to approach them was very powerful,” Zimmer said. “He was deeply attached to that. This made him an important and impactful leader.

As president, Sonnenschein enacted a series of changes to strengthen the University, including increasing the size of the College while maintaining the strength of UChicago’s renowned graduate programs. He also spearheaded improvements in the quality of student life and commissioned the first comprehensive campus planning process in 30 years.

His focus on thinking about the right questions and the right way to approach them was very powerful.

– Chancellor Robert J. Zimmer

Joseph Neubauer, Chairman of the University’s Board of Trustees, remembered Sonnenschein’s innovative and broad thinking and his “indomitable drive to get things done”.

“I still remember him saying at several board meetings, ‘When your friends and family call out to you for help getting their kids to UChicago, then you know we’ve really arrived,'” said Neubauer “Well, I’m happy to report that we have achieved and exceeded your vision and mission.”

Steven Poskanzer, Sonnenschein’s former chief of staff, said his mentor never stopped being a teacher, even when he became a university leader. “Only the nature of his class and his students has changed. Working alongside Hugo, watching him, was like being Hugo’s doctoral student in college leadership,” said Poskanzer, who later served as president of SUNY at New Paltz and Carleton College.

“He was the best and most caring mentor, who changed my life for the better and was a pillar of joy and friendship for me and my family,” Poskanzer added. “Not every president of UChicago, you know, will personally deliver the Medici pizza to your house.”

Poskanzer was not the only one to remember Sonnenschein’s thoughtfulness. Geoffrey Stone, Edward H. Levi Emeritus Service Law Professor at UChicago, described Sonnenschein as “the right person, at the right time, in the right place.” Sonnenschein not only wondered how he could add value to an institution, but he did so without the self-interest of limiting his own risk. On the contrary, he placed the interest of the University above that of his own ego.

Stone, whom Sonnenschein recruited to serve as provost at UChicago, recalled how the president opted against the tradition of going to the convocation ceremony last and by himself. Instead, he gently took Stone’s arm, pulled him back, and said, “Walk with me.”

“I’m proud to say that I have since done it and will continue to do so for the rest of my life,” Stone said.

Sonnenschein’s impact also extended far beyond the university and its Hyde Park campus. Renowned economists Andreu Mas-Colell – founder of the Barcelona School of Economics and professor at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Spain – and Richard Kihlstrom of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania have both spoken of their late colleague and friend as with a generous spirit that treated his students as colleagues and helped, even from afar.

The public memorial came after a two-day conference the Becker Friedman Institute of Economics convened to honor Sonnenschein. A member of the academic community for nearly three decades, he most recently served as Charles L. Hutchinson Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the Kenneth C. Griffin Department of Economics.

“He was the right person, at the right time, in the right place.”

-Teacher. Pierre Geoffrey

Sonnenschein is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Gunn Sonnenschein; their three daughters, Leah Schraudenbach, Amy Venetianer and Rachel Mossi; and five grandchildren.

His daughters, in a joint statement, said their father’s greatest fortune was attending the University of Rochester and meeting their mother. They talked about his unconditional love and how he taught them the importance of honesty and curiosity as well as how to parallel park, right an overturned canoe and build a fire and to clean.

Addressing his grandchildren, they concluded: “He loved you. You stretched him, and he enjoyed the stretch. He lives in you.

Read the original story at news.uchicago.edu.

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QU Announces Fall 2022 Virtuoso Scholarship Recipients https://sohamsa.org/qu-announces-fall-2022-virtuoso-scholarship-recipients/ Tue, 03 May 2022 17:12:19 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/qu-announces-fall-2022-virtuoso-scholarship-recipients/ The Music Department at Quincy University has awarded three high school students the Virtuoso Music Scholarship for the fall semester. The students auditioned on February 19, 2022 for the full four-year scholarship. Recipients were chosen at the discretion of the music faculty based on the needs of the ensemble and the talent level of the […]]]>

The Music Department at Quincy University has awarded three high school students the Virtuoso Music Scholarship for the fall semester. The students auditioned on February 19, 2022 for the full four-year scholarship. Recipients were chosen at the discretion of the music faculty based on the needs of the ensemble and the talent level of the applicants. Students are not required to major in music while at university.

The recipients of the Virtuoso Music Scholarship are Chloe Jenson from St. Anthony High School in Effingham, Illinois, majoring in biology; Lora Launer of Warsaw High School in Warsaw, Illinois, majoring in music education and Alanna Edgecomb of Camp Point Central High School in Quincy, Illinois, majoring in music.

“QU’s music faculty were so impressed with the level of musicianship and academic background of each of the students who auditioned,” said Christine Damm, DMA dean of the school of fine arts and communications. “We are very pleased to offer the Virtuoso Music Scholarship to three outstanding students whose hard work, dedication and talent have truly paid off. These students will lend their talents to many QU music ensembles and become part of the QU musical family.”

Founded in 1860 by Franciscan friars, Quincy University is a small Catholic university with an emphasis on the sciences, liberal arts, and professions. Quincy University offers undergraduate, graduate, and adult education programs that incorporate practical experience and Franciscan values. Faculty and advisors work with students to design personalized success plans to help them graduate on time, find their passion, and prepare them for life. QU is a member of NCAA Division II for intercollegiate athletics. For more information, please visit www.quincy.edu or contact the Office of Community Relations at (217) 228-5275 or communityrelations@quincy.edu. Quincy University. Success by design.

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Gifted Bronx Scholar Student Disappears https://sohamsa.org/gifted-bronx-scholar-student-disappears/ Sun, 01 May 2022 23:32:47 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/gifted-bronx-scholar-student-disappears/ CASTLE HILL, The Bronx (PIX11) – The mother of 16-year-old Jezlieanne Colon, who attends a prep school for girls in Manhattan on a scholarship, was mad to find the girl, after the teenager left home at 15 hours on Saturday. “My daughter has been gifted since childhood,” the missing girl’s mother, Kimberly Varela, told PIX11 […]]]>

CASTLE HILL, The Bronx (PIX11) – The mother of 16-year-old Jezlieanne Colon, who attends a prep school for girls in Manhattan on a scholarship, was mad to find the girl, after the teenager left home at 15 hours on Saturday.

“My daughter has been gifted since childhood,” the missing girl’s mother, Kimberly Varela, told PIX11 News on Sunday of the girl’s recent studies at Nightingale Bamford School on Manhattan’s East Side. “This has never happened before.”

The mother added that her daughter’s cell phone last rang at the No. 6 station in the Castle Hill neighborhood of the Bronx, where the family lives. Nightingale Bamford School is located at 20 East 92n/a Manhattan street.

During the first year of the pandemic, Jezlieanne Colon was educated remotely at home. The mother said that when her daughter started going to in-person classes again, some issues arose. She said her daughter was adjusting to new classmates in another Upper East Side neighborhood.

“I would say three months into school the teachers were calling me,” Varela told PIX11 News.
“They said she arrived happy one day, sad the next.”

The mother said part of her daughter’s problems stemmed from being the “only dark-skinned girl in school,” Varela said.

“Everyone is Caucasian; she always told me she didn’t fit in,” the mother said.

The mother had concerns about another girl from school that Colon started hanging out with, who lives on the East Side of Manhattan.

Colon has a twin brother who said he saw his sister running out at 3 p.m. Saturday in the Castle Hill neighborhood where the family lives. She also has a younger sister.

The mother told PIX11 News she had filed a missing person report. Police have asked for help in locating the missing teenager. The missing teenager is about 5ft 7in tall with red hair and brown eyes, police said.

Submit information to police by calling Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477), visiting crimestoppers.nypdonline.org, by downloading the NYPD Crime Stoppers mobile app or by texting 274637 (CRIMES) and entering TIP577. Spanish-speaking callers are asked to dial 1-888-57-PISTA (74782).

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Geborkoff Wins PEO Fellowship | News, Sports, Jobs https://sohamsa.org/geborkoff-wins-peo-fellowship-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 05:54:44 +0000 https://sohamsa.org/geborkoff-wins-peo-fellowship-news-sports-jobs/ Geborkoff HOUGHTON — Micaela Geborkoff is the 2022 PEO Sisterhood STAR Fellowship recipient. Geborkoff was nominated for this award by the local PEO Chapter DJ due to her outstanding academic record, involvement in multiple extracurricular activities, dedication to community service programs combined with her leadership skills and experience. . She will […]]]>

Geborkoff

HOUGHTON — Micaela Geborkoff is the 2022 PEO Sisterhood STAR Fellowship recipient.

Geborkoff was nominated for this award by the local PEO Chapter DJ due to her outstanding academic record, involvement in multiple extracurricular activities, dedication to community service programs combined with her leadership skills and experience. .

She will receive $2,500 for this honor to be used for higher education. Geborkoff will graduate from Houghton High School in June 2022 and plans to attend Michigan Technological University this fall. She is one of a handful of incoming students who have received a prestigious Leading Scholar Award.

Geborkoff plans to earn a bachelor’s degree in medical laboratory science with a minor in Spanish. Thereafter, she plans to pursue medical studies.

PEO (Philanthropic Educational Organization) has helped more than 113,000 women pursue educational goals by providing more than $366 million in grants, scholarships, awards, and loans and operating Cottey College (an all-women’s college in Iowa) . The PEO STAR Scholarship (STAR) was established in 2009 to provide scholarships to outstanding high school women to attend an accredited post-secondary institution in the United States or Canada during the next academic year.

For more information about PEO and its fellowships, visit: www.peointernational.org.



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